1100 Westheimer | Houston, Texas

Sunday – Wednesday 11AM – Midnight
Thursday – Saturday 11AM – 2AM
Happy Hour: Daily 11AM - Noon and 3PM – 6:30PM
Happy Hour Specials: 30 beers for $3 each, $5 beer and a shot
21+ after 7pm


Beer List

We take beer very seriously. We built this bar to store and deliver craft beer under its most ideal conditions.  We’ve gone to painstaking efforts to ensure that our beers are always served at the proper temperature, with the correct pressure and gas mix, in appropriate glassware and by folks who know what the hell they’re talking about. 

We have 80 taps—75 draft and 5 cask engines.  Our cooler has separate zones for lagers and ales and individually regulated pressure on each tap for perfect pours.  We're aging more than 200 kegs in our cellar right now. 

Our extensive bottle list—featuring cellared beers, hard-to-find bottlings, more readily available bottle-conditioned beers and more—has beers that date back to 2001, and we're even selling beers By the Glass. 

Beer. We got it. You want it. So we’re kinda like a team. YAY TEAM!


View Bottle List PDF

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Brewery Beer Style Category IBU ABV
Firestone Walker Brewing Company 18th Anniversary Strong Ale Dark and Flavorful 35 13.00
Firestone Walker Brewing Company 18th Anniversary Strong Ale Dark and Flavorful 35 13.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Firestone Walker Brewing Company 18th Anniversary

Style:
Strong Ale

Brewery:
Firestone Walker Brewing Company

1400 Ramada Dr
Paso Robles , CA 93446

http://www.firestonebeer.com/

Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

Firestone ...

read more

Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

Firestone Walker’s ales are selectively fermented in the Firestone Union oak barrel brewing system. The Firestone Union incorporates 65-gallon, medium and heavy toast American oak barrels.

Firestone Walker takes pride in making exceptional pale ales. More recently, they created a seasonal series offering, as well as their Proprietor’s Reserve series of beers, born from their Anniversary program. These vintage and limited release beers are the consummate sipping beers, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family. 

Firestone Walker Brewing Company continues to grow as the palates of Americans migrate to craft beer. Their brew staff has picked up “Mid Size Brewery of the Year” at the World Beer Cup an unmatched four times.

read less
J.W. Lee's 2001 Harvest Ale English Barley Wine The Brown Note None 11.50
J.W. Lee's 2001 Harvest Ale English Barley Wine The Brown Note None 11.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

275mL

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

J.W. Lee's 2001 Harvest Ale

Caramelized Dark Fruits, Toffee, Butterscotch and Slightly Muddled Aged Hops

Caramelized Dark Fruits, Toffee, Butterscotch and Slightly Muddled Aged Hops

read less

Style:
English Barley Wine

English Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
read more
English Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

About Strong Ales
Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
Appearance
The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

Aroma/Taste
The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
Ingredients
Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
Examples
Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

History 
This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
read less

Brewery:
J.W. Lee's

Greengate Brewery
Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

read more

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

read less
Brewery Liefmans 2010 Goudenband Oud Bruin Malty, Toasty, and Nutty None 8.00
Brewery Liefmans 2010 Goudenband Oud Bruin Malty, Toasty, and Nutty None 8.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Brewery Liefmans 2010 Goudenband

"Infinitely complex in aroma and flavor with notes of maltiness and tartness throughout. An unsurpassed old brown with the richness and complexity of a vintage wine." Commercial Description

"Infinitely complex in aroma and flavor with notes of maltiness and tartness throughout. An unsurpassed old brown with the richness and complexity of a vintage wine." Commercial Description

read less

Style:
Oud Bruin

Brewery:
Brewery Liefmans

Aalststraat 200
Oudenaarde, Belgium 9700

http://www.liefmans.be/

Belgian brewery which produces oud bruin and other Belgian beers. It was founded in 1679. The company went bankrupt in 2008 and was acquired by Duvel Moortgat. Liefmans' wheat beer, Dentergems Wit, and a Belgian ale, Lucifer, were subsequently taken over by Het Anker Brewery.

Belgian brewery which produces oud bruin and other Belgian beers. It was founded in 1679. The company went bankrupt in 2008 and was acquired by Duvel Moortgat. Liefmans' wheat beer, Dentergems Wit, and a Belgian ale, Lucifer, were subsequently taken over by Het Anker Brewery.

read less
J.W. Lee's 2010 Harvest Ale Sherry Barrel Aged Barleywine The Brown Note None 11.50
J.W. Lee's 2010 Harvest Ale Sherry Barrel Aged Barleywine The Brown Note None 11.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

275mL

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

J.W. Lee's 2010 Harvest Ale Sherry

sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates.

sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates.

read less

Style:
Barrel Aged Barleywine

Brewery:
J.W. Lee's

Greengate Brewery
Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

read more

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

read less
J.W. Lee's 2011 Harvest Ale Calvados English Barley Wine The Brown Note None 11.50
J.W. Lee's 2011 Harvest Ale Calvados English Barley Wine The Brown Note None 11.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

275mL

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

J.W. Lee's 2011 Harvest Ale Calvados

sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates, and faint smoky oak

sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates, and faint smoky oak

read less

Style:
English Barley Wine

English Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
read more
English Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

About Strong Ales
Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
Appearance
The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

Aroma/Taste
The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
Ingredients
Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
Examples
Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

History 
This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
read less

Brewery:
J.W. Lee's

Greengate Brewery
Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

read more

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

read less
Real Ale Brewing Company 2011 Sisyphus American Barley Wine The Brown Note 75 11.50
Real Ale Brewing Company 2011 Sisyphus American Barley Wine The Brown Note 75 11.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

12oz

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

24.000 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Real Ale Brewing Company 2011 Sisyphus

Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey 

Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey 

read less

Style:
American Barley Wine

American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
read more
American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

About Strong Ales
Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
Appearance
The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

Aroma/Taste
The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
Ingredients
Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
Examples
Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

History 
This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
read less

Brewery:
Real Ale Brewing Company

231 San Saba Ct
Blanco, TX 78606

http://realalebrewing.com/

Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

read more

Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

read less
Real Ale Brewing Company 2012 Sisyphus American Barley Wine The Brown Note 75 10.50
Real Ale Brewing Company 2012 Sisyphus American Barley Wine The Brown Note 75 10.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

12oz

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

24.000 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Real Ale Brewing Company 2012 Sisyphus

Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey 

Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey 

read less

Style:
American Barley Wine

American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
read more
American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

About Strong Ales
Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
Appearance
The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

Aroma/Taste
The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
Ingredients
Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
Examples
Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

History 
This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
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Brewery:
Real Ale Brewing Company

231 San Saba Ct
Blanco, TX 78606

http://realalebrewing.com/

Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

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Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

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Sierra Nevada 2013 Bigfoot American Barley Wine Not for the Faint of Heart 90 9.60
Sierra Nevada 2013 Bigfoot American Barley Wine Not for the Faint of Heart 90 9.60

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

18 - 19 / Amber-Brown

Original Gravity

23.000 plato

Final Gravity

6.000 plato

Hops

Cascade +

Flavor: Intense citrus, grapefruit and piney notes.

Aroma: Spicy flowers and some grass.

Alpha Acids: 4.5 - 7%                      

Beta Acids: 4.5 - 7%                         

Dual Purpose 

Centennial +

Flavor: Slightly more bitter than Cascade with some strong grapefruit notes and spicy tones.

Aroma: Grapefruit and herbal notes.

Alpha Acids: 9.5 - 11.5%     

Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

Dual Purpose

Chinook +

Flavor: Harsh bitterness with and emphasis on spice and earthiness

Aroma: Spicy with some pine and smokiness

Alpha Acids: 12 - 14%         

Beta Acids: 3 - 4%                            

Bittering

Malt Variety

Sierra Nevada 2013 Bigfoot

"Bigfoot is a beast of a beer, brimming with bold flavors of bittersweet malt and heaps of aggressive whole-cone Pacific Northwest hops. First introduced in the winter of 1983, Bigfoot is a cult-classic beer brewed in the barleywine style, meaning a strong, robust, bruiser of ...

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"Bigfoot is a beast of a beer, brimming with bold flavors of bittersweet malt and heaps of aggressive whole-cone Pacific Northwest hops. First introduced in the winter of 1983, Bigfoot is a cult-classic beer brewed in the barleywine style, meaning a strong, robust, bruiser of a beer with the refined intensity of a wine. Bigfoot is prized by beer collectors for its supreme cellarability. Under the proper conditions, it can age like a fine wine, developing new flavors and character as it matures in the bottle. Each new release or “expedition” is vintage dated. Collect your own and see the flavors develop and progress." Commercial Description

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Style:
American Barley Wine

American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
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American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

About Strong Ales
Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
Appearance
The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

Aroma/Taste
The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
Ingredients
Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
Examples
Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

History 
This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
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Brewery:
Sierra Nevada

1075 E. 20th St.
Chico, CA 95928

http://www.sierranevada.com/

In 1979, Ken Grossman began building a small brewery in the town of Chico, California. His goal: to brew exceptional ales and lagers. Today, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is considered the premier craft brewery in the United States. And the beer? Critics proclaim it, “Among ...

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In 1979, Ken Grossman began building a small brewery in the town of Chico, California. His goal: to brew exceptional ales and lagers. Today, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is considered the premier craft brewery in the United States. And the beer? Critics proclaim it, “Among the best brewed anywhere in the world.” 

Ken’s passion for brewing began when a friend’s father showed him the basics of homebrewing. Using homemade equipment, he began brewing five-gallon batches of beer on his own and soon became a proficient home brewer. 

In 1976, after studying chemistry and physics at Butte Community College and California State University, Chico, he opened his own store, The Home Brew Shop. There, he supplied Chico’s homebrewing community with equipment, materials and advice, but dreamed of opening his own brewery. 

Two years later, it was time to make the dream a reality. Ken cobbled together a brewery from dairy tanks, a soft-drink bottler and equipment salvaged from defunct breweries. Though the equipment was secondhand, he created a first-rate microbrewery. The ingredients were premium, including the copious quantities of hops that would become the brewery’s trademark. An avid backpacker, Ken named the new company for his favorite hiking grounds—the Sierra Nevada Mountains. 

On November 15, 1980, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. brewed the first batch of what would soon become a landmark in American craft brewing: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Word spread quickly and over the next decade the demand for Sierra Nevada brews soon exceeded the brewery’s modest brewing capacity. Despite nearly constant additions to the brewery, Ken was soon back at the drawing board, planning a new brewery. In 1989, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. moved to its current site. 

Ken traveled to Germany and brought back a used, traditional, 100-barrel copper brewhouse that became the heart of the new brewery. It met demand for a while, but the brewery soon needed to expand again. In 1997, he commissioned a new, larger brewhouse, and coaxed the original coppersmiths out of retirement to match new kettles to the originals. This expansion became the powerhouse that helped bring the brewery’s total capacity to more than 800,000 barrels per year. 

Building the new brewery afforded Sierra Nevada the opportunity to create two stunning showcases, both featuring exceptional dining, live music and its award-winning beers. The Sierra Nevada Taproom and Restaurant has become a destination in its own right. The brewery is also home to the 350-seat Big Room—a beautifully designed live music venue.

Sierra Nevada brewed one million barrels in 2014. Year round beers include Pale Ale (flagship), Torpedo® Extra IPA, Hop Hunter® IPA, Nooner® Pilsner, Porter, Stout, and Kellerweis® Bavarian-Style Wheat.

The soul of Sierra Nevada is the brewery's affinity for whole-cone hops and the special flavors and aromas they provide. Sierra Nevada uses more whole-cone hops than any brewery in the world. They love the aromas from dry-hopped beers so much that they created the revolutionary “Hop Torpedo,” a sleek, stainless steel device they use to gather the most hop flavor and aroma without imparting any excess bitterness.

In every aspect of the brewery, Sierra Nevada strives to be as environmentally responsible as possible. From recycling and composting to water treatment, bio-fuel production and water conservation, the brewery works hard to minimize its impact on the environment. In 2008, Sierra Nevada completed construction of one of the largest privately owned solar arrays in the country with more than 10,000 panels that provide nearly 20% of the brewery's total energy needs. 

In 2005, Sierra Nevada was the first brewery to install hydrogen fuel cells; the combination of the solar array and the fuel cell system generates more than half of the brewery’s energy needs on site. They also have an extensive water treatment program including our own wastewater treatment facility. 

Through extensive recycling, reuse and composting programs, the brewery is able to divert 99.8% of its solid waste from landfills. 

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. was named a “Green Power Partner” in 2011 by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and "Green Business of the Year" in 2010 by the EPA for its practices in sustainability.

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J.W. Lee's 2013 Harvest Ale Lagavulin Barrel Aged Barleywine The Brown Note None 11.50
J.W. Lee's 2013 Harvest Ale Lagavulin Barrel Aged Barleywine The Brown Note None 11.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

275mL

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

J.W. Lee's 2013 Harvest Ale Lagavulin

sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates, and peat

sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates, and peat

read less

Style:
Barrel Aged Barleywine

Brewery:
J.W. Lee's

Greengate Brewery
Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

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JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

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Cascade Brewing 2015 Cranberry Wild Ale Fresh and Fruity None 8.00
Cascade Brewing 2015 Cranberry Wild Ale Fresh and Fruity None 8.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

750mL

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Cascade Brewing 2015 Cranberry

Cranberries, Orange Peel and Cinnamon

Cranberries, Orange Peel and Cinnamon

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Style:
Wild Ale

Brewery:
Cascade Brewing

7424 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy
Portland, OR 97225

http://cascadebrewing.com/

Cascade Brewing was founded in 1998 by owner Art Larrance and brewmaster Ron Gansberg. Together, Art and Ron put their 40 years combined beer experience to work, designing and installing Cascade’s 10-barrel brewing system in Southwest Portland, then creating and distributing well-balanced traditional ales ...

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Cascade Brewing was founded in 1998 by owner Art Larrance and brewmaster Ron Gansberg. Together, Art and Ron put their 40 years combined beer experience to work, designing and installing Cascade’s 10-barrel brewing system in Southwest Portland, then creating and distributing well-balanced traditional ales.

Sour beers really came about by default. The pair had followed the trends of traditional ales and were growing tired of what they referred to as the “hops arms race” of ever-hoppier beers, especially in the Northwest. Both wanted to focus instead on beers that offered an intense sensory experience other than hops. They considered what they could draw upon from the region: an abundant supply of wine barrels from the nearby wine country, and access to delicious and plentiful local fruit.

They chose to create sour ales (though they purposefully stayed away from trying to recreate Belgian style sour ales). Employing lactobacillus, an acid bacteria that produces moderate levels of acidity and sour flavors, they began their sour journey in 2005. By 2006, they were producing the base beer that would then be aged for up to a year in wine, port and whiskey oak barrels.

In 2008, the brewery developed three ultra-premium, oak barrel-aged, lactic-fermented Northwest sour ales: Kriek, Apricot and Cuvee du Jongleur. Each was hand-bottled in 750 ml champagne bottles with a cork and wire basket. That fall, Cascade entered all three into the Great American Beer Festival in the Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer category: a total of 22 beers were entered in the class, and Cascade Kriek took the Bronze.

In 2009, they brought in 4,500 lbs. of Bing and sour pie cherries straight from the orchards for making Kriek, Sang Royale and Sang Noir. They picked up 2,500 lbs. of apricots for their Apricot Ale, one ton of Cabernet Sauvignon grapes for a yet to be named beer (going through extensive aging) and 2,500 lbs. of white wine grapes for The Vine. That fall, they again traveled to the Great American Beer Festival, submitting three of their beers in the Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer category. Out of 45 entries, Cascade Brewing was awarded the Gold for Bourbonic Plague and the Silver for Vlad the Imp Aler. These wins propelled the obscure brewery into the forefront nationally for Northwest sour ales.

In September 2010, Cascade opened the Cascade Brewing Barrel House, the nation’s first “House of Sour,” at 939 SE Belmont Street in Portland. Located in a 7,000 square foot former produce warehouse, the Barrel House contained a 5,000 square foot production side with a loading dock, barrel room, cooler and workspace; as well as a 2,100 square foot tasting room with seating for 90 inside and another 80 out front.

In 2014, the production side of the Barrel House was bursting at the seams and needed to relocate. Cascade leased a 23,000-square-foot warehouse in Southwest Portland that headquarters all of its blending, aging, packaging and distribution. The Cascade Blending House currently holds more than 1,500 barrels filled with its sour beer, plus an additional nine foudres (giant wooden barrels that typically hold around 1,800 gallons of beer). All of its beers continue to be brewed at the original brewery at 7424 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy in Portland.

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J.W. Lee's 2015 Tequila Barrel Aged Harvest Ale Barrel Aged Barleywine The Hay Merchant Cellar None 11.50
J.W. Lee's 2015 Tequila Barrel Aged Harvest Ale Barrel Aged Barleywine The Hay Merchant Cellar None 11.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

J.W. Lee's 2015 Tequila Barrel Aged Harvest Ale

This fully fermented ale has been brewed by JW Lees as a celebration of the brewers' art. Harvest Ale can be enjoyed now or laid down like a fine wine for enjoyment to come." Commercial Description

This fully fermented ale has been brewed by JW Lees as a celebration of the brewers' art. Harvest Ale can be enjoyed now or laid down like a fine wine for enjoyment to come." Commercial Description

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Style:
Barrel Aged Barleywine

Brewery:
J.W. Lee's

Greengate Brewery
Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

read more

JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

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Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales 2016 Clementina Saison Sours 11 5.50
Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales 2016 Clementina Saison Sours 11 5.50

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

750mL

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales 2016 Clementina

A bright and highly effervescent oak aged golden saison. Brewed with citrus peel, pink Himalayan salt, coriander and clementine juice. Citrus and bready wheat in the aroma, tart and refreshing with notes of citrus in the finish.

A bright and highly effervescent oak aged golden saison. Brewed with citrus peel, pink Himalayan salt, coriander and clementine juice. Citrus and bready wheat in the aroma, tart and refreshing with notes of citrus in the finish.

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Style:
Saison

Brewery:
Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales

311 S. Main St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104

http://www.jollypumpkin.com/jp/home

Ron Jeffries founded Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in 2004 in Dexter, Michigan. It operates two pubs, one in Ann Arbor and the other in Traverse City. Jolly Pumpkin produces a variety of unfiltered and unpasteurized "rustic country" beers.

Jolly Pumpkin ages their beers in wine ...

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Ron Jeffries founded Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in 2004 in Dexter, Michigan. It operates two pubs, one in Ann Arbor and the other in Traverse City. Jolly Pumpkin produces a variety of unfiltered and unpasteurized "rustic country" beers.

Jolly Pumpkin ages their beers in wine barrels, which contain naturally occurring microbiological cultures including brettanomyces. These cultures produce a complex flavor profile in their beers, which includes flavors described as leathery, earthy, wild, funky, or even "sweaty horse hair character,” which may approximate how beer tasted before the advent of pasteurization and industrialization. This style of beer has been described as "farmhouse ale" or American Wild Ale. Jolly Pumpkin was not the first brewery in the U.S. to start brewing these styles, but it is one of the most well known.

Their year-round productions include Oro de Calabaza, La Roja, Calabaza Blanca, Bam Biere, and Bam Noire.  Their seasonal beers include Madrugada Obscura “Dark Dawn”, Biere de Mars, E.S. Bam, Luciernaga “The Firefly” Weizen Bam Miere, La Parcela, Fuego del Otono, Noel de Calabaza, Marcaibo Especial, and Perseguidor.

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Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2016 Sucaba Barrel Aged Barleywine Deeper Flavors 31 12.50
Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2016 Sucaba Barrel Aged Barleywine Deeper Flavors 31 12.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

22oz

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2016 Sucaba

After taking a year off, Sucaba returns for a curtain call in 2018. As always, this latest vintage delivers big, boozy bourbon and American oak aromas combine with soft chocolate malt undertones. Complex malt flavors are framed in oak with hints of dark chocolate, vanilla ...

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After taking a year off, Sucaba returns for a curtain call in 2018. As always, this latest vintage delivers big, boozy bourbon and American oak aromas combine with soft chocolate malt undertones. Complex malt flavors are framed in oak with hints of dark chocolate, vanilla, toasted coconut and a touch of dark cherry. Sucaba is a one-of-a-kind sipping experience.  It is a beer built to last, and one that will reward careful cellaring for years to come. We highly recommend counting the years with an abacus.

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Style:
Barrel Aged Barleywine

Brewery:
Firestone Walker Brewing Company

1400 Ramada Dr
Paso Robles , CA 93446

http://www.firestonebeer.com/

Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

Firestone ...

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Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

Firestone Walker’s ales are selectively fermented in the Firestone Union oak barrel brewing system. The Firestone Union incorporates 65-gallon, medium and heavy toast American oak barrels.

Firestone Walker takes pride in making exceptional pale ales. More recently, they created a seasonal series offering, as well as their Proprietor’s Reserve series of beers, born from their Anniversary program. These vintage and limited release beers are the consummate sipping beers, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family. 

Firestone Walker Brewing Company continues to grow as the palates of Americans migrate to craft beer. Their brew staff has picked up “Mid Size Brewery of the Year” at the World Beer Cup an unmatched four times.

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Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2017 Parabola Barrel Aged Imperial Stout Tall, Dark, and Handsome 69 12.70
Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2017 Parabola Barrel Aged Imperial Stout Tall, Dark, and Handsome 69 12.70

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

12oz

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2017 Parabola

Parabola is a beer of darkness and immensity, a barrel-­aged beast that is routinely ranked as one of the top beers in the world.  This Russian imperial oatmeal stout is aged for a full year in  Heaven Hill barrels, developing flavors of rich, chewy ...

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Parabola is a beer of darkness and immensity, a barrel-­aged beast that is routinely ranked as one of the top beers in the world.  This Russian imperial oatmeal stout is aged for a full year in  Heaven Hill barrels, developing flavors of rich, chewy roasted malts, charred oak and bourbony vanilla. Parabola bares its teeth with its impenetrable black hue and soaring alcohol, yet its bite remains refined with a silky, balanced finish.   

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Style:
Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

Brewery:
Firestone Walker Brewing Company

1400 Ramada Dr
Paso Robles , CA 93446

http://www.firestonebeer.com/

Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

Firestone ...

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Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

Firestone Walker’s ales are selectively fermented in the Firestone Union oak barrel brewing system. The Firestone Union incorporates 65-gallon, medium and heavy toast American oak barrels.

Firestone Walker takes pride in making exceptional pale ales. More recently, they created a seasonal series offering, as well as their Proprietor’s Reserve series of beers, born from their Anniversary program. These vintage and limited release beers are the consummate sipping beers, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family. 

Firestone Walker Brewing Company continues to grow as the palates of Americans migrate to craft beer. Their brew staff has picked up “Mid Size Brewery of the Year” at the World Beer Cup an unmatched four times.

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BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) √225 Saison Farmhouse Saison Sour and Funky None 5.00
BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) √225 Saison Farmhouse Saison Sour and Funky None 5.00

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

3 - 3 / Straw

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) √225 Saison

"Brewed for BFM's 15th Anniversary! Belgian style saison matured in third use Abbaye de Saint Bon Chien barrels for 4 months."  Commercial Desription

"Brewed for BFM's 15th Anniversary! Belgian style saison matured in third use Abbaye de Saint Bon Chien barrels for 4 months."  Commercial Desription

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Style:
Farmhouse Saison

Brewery:
BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes)

Ch. des Buissons 8
Saignelégier, CH-2350

http://www.brasseriebfm.ch/en/

Jérôme Rebetez concocted the first batches of beer in his parents’ kitchen. Enthusiastic about his results, he decided to present some of his creations at the “Swiss Homebrewing Trophy” contest. Apparently, he wasn’t the only one who enjoyed his brews; the judges ...

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Jérôme Rebetez concocted the first batches of beer in his parents’ kitchen. Enthusiastic about his results, he decided to present some of his creations at the “Swiss Homebrewing Trophy” contest. Apparently, he wasn’t the only one who enjoyed his brews; the judges at the contest awarded Jérôme the first place.

At 23, with a bachelor in enology, Jérôme Rebetez aspired to open up a brewery in his home region of Franches Montagnes. Full of passion but without any cash, Jérôme Rebetez decided to create beers with atypical character. He won the televised competition "Le rêve de vos 20 ans," which allowed him to establish La Brasserie des Franches-Montagnes in Saignelégier, Jura, with the obtained cash. With its spirited image, BFM was positioned as a pioneer in Swiss artisan brewing, crafting finesse beers that are complex with a great corps.

Jérôme Rebetez uses ingredients chosen to guarantee the highest quality. They are always original and sometimes tricky to mix like Sarawak pepper, sage or other spices. He built a reputation for crafting rich beers with complex bouquets, remarkable tastes and long finishes. 

L’Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien, a BFM specialty that matures in oak barrels for 12 months, was mentioned in The New York Times as the one of the best barley wines in the world.

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Firestone Walker Brewing Company 805 American Blonde Ale Sociable and Refreshing None 4.70
Firestone Walker Brewing Company 805 American Blonde Ale Sociable and Refreshing None 4.70

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Firestone Walker Brewing Company 805

"A light, refreshing blonde ale crafted for the California lifestyle. Subtle malt sweetness is balanced by a touch of hops, creating a versatile beer with a clean finish." Commercial Description

"A light, refreshing blonde ale crafted for the California lifestyle. Subtle malt sweetness is balanced by a touch of hops, creating a versatile beer with a clean finish." Commercial Description

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Style:
American Blonde Ale

American Blonde Ale

Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

Appearance
The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
Aroma/Flavor
Blonde Ales have ...
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American Blonde Ale

Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

Appearance
The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
Aroma/Flavor
Blonde Ales have a light to moderate sweet malty aroma with low to moderate fruitiness.
The flavor has an initial malty sweetness but optionally some bready, toasty or biscuit-like flavor. With a light to moderate hop flavor and low to medium bitterness, the finish is medium-dry to somewhat sweet. The mouthfeel is medium light to medium body with medium to high carbonation.

Ingredients
 Usually, Blonde Ales use 100% malted barley, but sometimes as much as 25% wheat malt can be used. This beer can also be hopped with any hop. 

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve Blonde Ale in an American Pint, and it's stored in our lager cooler at 35°. 

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 3.5%-5.5% and an average IBU range of 15-28.
Examples
Great craft examples of this style are Southern Star Bombshell Blonde Ale and Real Ale Fireman’s #4.

History
Blonde Ale is a modern American take on the old American cream style ale style, which were brewed by ale breweries to compete against larger producers in pre-Prohibition Northeast and Mid-Atlanta America.  Cream ales were not 100% malted barley, but contained a percentage of corn.  Blonde Ales are also called Golden Ales, but should not be confused with Belgian-Style Golden Ales.
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Brewery:
Firestone Walker Brewing Company

1400 Ramada Dr
Paso Robles , CA 93446

http://www.firestonebeer.com/

Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

Firestone ...

read more

Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

Firestone Walker’s ales are selectively fermented in the Firestone Union oak barrel brewing system. The Firestone Union incorporates 65-gallon, medium and heavy toast American oak barrels.

Firestone Walker takes pride in making exceptional pale ales. More recently, they created a seasonal series offering, as well as their Proprietor’s Reserve series of beers, born from their Anniversary program. These vintage and limited release beers are the consummate sipping beers, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family. 

Firestone Walker Brewing Company continues to grow as the palates of Americans migrate to craft beer. Their brew staff has picked up “Mid Size Brewery of the Year” at the World Beer Cup an unmatched four times.

read less
Legal Draft Beer Company Accused Amber Vienna Lager (Amber Lager) Malty, Toasty, and Nutty None 5.50
Legal Draft Beer Company Accused Amber Vienna Lager (Amber Lager) Malty, Toasty, and Nutty None 5.50

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Legal Draft Beer Company Accused Amber

Clean and crystal clear. Malty sweetness and mild hop flavor. Easy drinking

Clean and crystal clear. Malty sweetness and mild hop flavor. Easy drinking

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Style:
Vienna Lager (Amber Lager)

Vienna Lager is a classic German lager. It was very common in the years after its first release in 1840, but it has become somewhat rare.

Appearance 
The lager should be light reddish amber to copper color with bright clarity and a large off-white, persistent ...

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Vienna Lager is a classic German lager. It was very common in the years after its first release in 1840, but it has become somewhat rare.

Appearance 
The lager should be light reddish amber to copper color with bright clarity and a large off-white, persistent head.

Aroma/Flavor
The beer should have a moderately rich German malt aroma (of Vienna and/or Munich malt). It has clean lager character, with no fruity esters or diacetyl. Noble hop aroma may be low to none.

On the palate, soft, elegant malt complexity is in the forefront, with a firm enough hop bitterness to provide a balanced finish. There is toasted character from the use of Vienna malt, but no roasted or caramel flavor. The finish is fairly dry, with both malt and hop bitterness present in the aftertaste.

Ingredients 
As with Oktoberfests, only the finest quality malt should be used, along with Continental hops (preferably Noble varieties). It’s made with moderately hard, carbonate-rich water. Some caramel malts and/or darker malts may be used to add color and sweetness, but caramel malts shouldn’t add significant aroma and flavor and dark malts shouldn’t provide any roasted character. 

Glassware and Serving Temperature 
At Hay Merchant, this style of beer is served in an 16oz American Pint. We store and serve the beer from our lager cooler at 35° F.

Stats
Vienna ranges in the high 20s (IBU). Vienna Lagers are also lightly darker then the similar Märzen (11-14 SRM compared to 9-13 SRM, but noticeable lighter then than dark lagers of the time (40 SRM). 

History 
Vienna lagers and Märzen are very closely related. Both beers were brought to the market in 1841, one year before Pilsner made it appearance. The two brewers that invented the styles (Vienna lagers and Märzen) were close friends and helped each other develop the two different styles. Vienna Lager was developed by Anton Dreher. who owned the Schwechat Brewery near Vienna. Märzen was developed by Gabriel Sedlmayr.

Prior to the development of Vienna lagers, Märzen and Pilsner in the early 1840s all German lagers were a shade of dark brown, due to the malts brewers were using. Prior to 1840, all German malts were dried using a direct fire method. This technique used open flame to heat the stone floor of the malt kiln. The resulting malts were unevenly roasted. Some kernels were very dark, while others were light. Some kernels were very dry, and others still had fairly high moisture content.

In the early 1800s, the British developed a way to dry malts using an indirect method. By using heated air instead of direct flame, the malt could be completely dried without burning or even darkening. The result was pale malt. The British used pale malt to start brewing beers like Pale Ale.

In 1833, Dreher and Sedlmayr went on a fact-finding mission to the United Kingdom. Some people would call the trip an exercise in industrial espionage; others would call it smart business. Call it what you may, but upon their return to their respective breweries, they quickly adopted the British method of malt drying.

Using these new methods, Dreher released a completely new beer: Vienna Lager, which had medium body and full malty flavor (typical Central Eurpean).  Vienna finishes much dryer then Märzen with a higher level of bitterness up front. 

The unique blend of British influence and German flavor led to the invention of a new beer style and a new type of malt. While Vienna Lager is rare today, Vienna malt is still widely used.

Strangely enough, Vienna Lagers are most commonly found in Mexico. This might have to do with the very brief period from 1864-1867 that Archduke Ferdinand Maximillian Joseph ruled Mexico as Maximilian I, Emperor of Mexico. Unfortunately, high quality examples of this style no longer exist even in Mexico due to the industrial scaled production methods employed. 

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Brewery:
Legal Draft Beer Company

500 E Division st
Arlington, TX 76011

http://www.legaldraftbeer.com/

We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and ...

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We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and are meant to stand up with the best beers in our state, our nation, and the world. We hope you’ll enjoy them with your family and friends in our taproom and beer garden, or at your favorite watering hole.

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Saint Arnold Brewing Company Art Car IPA IPA Hop-a-licious 55 7.20
Saint Arnold Brewing Company Art Car IPA IPA Hop-a-licious 55 7.20

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

4 - 5 / Pale Gold

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Saint Arnold Brewing Company Art Car IPA

"National IPA Day seems like the perfect time to release our newest beer, Art Car IPA, a very hoppy American IPA featuring a blend of both new and old hop varieties from the Pacific Northwest. We love this beer.

The nose is a blend of ...

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"National IPA Day seems like the perfect time to release our newest beer, Art Car IPA, a very hoppy American IPA featuring a blend of both new and old hop varieties from the Pacific Northwest. We love this beer.

The nose is a blend of apricot and tropical fruit and mango. The taste starts with a big bitter blood orange that morphs into mangos and sweet tropical fruits. There is a lightly sweet malt body that allows the hops to shine while there being a nice complexity to the flavors.

The Art Car IPA name was inspired by the fleet of hand painted Art Cars created by local artists for Saint Arnold. You've probably seen our salespeople driving them around town. The label artwork was designed by renowned Houston graffiti artist and our good friend, GONZO247, who has painted four Saint Arnold Art Cars. If you've been to the brewery, you've seen his murals on the inside and outside of our building." Commercial Description

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Style:
IPA

IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category ...
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IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

Aroma/Taste
A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
Ingredients
IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
Examples
Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

History 
The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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Brewery:
Saint Arnold Brewing Company

2000 Lyons Avenue
Houston, TX 77020

http://www.saintarnold.com/

The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have ...

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The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have attracted a large following. Saint Arnold has won numerous national and international awards.

Saint Arnold was originally located on the far northwest side of Houston and operated out of that location for more than fifteen years. In 2009, Saint Arnold purchased a three-story 104,000-square-foot brick building—constructed in 1914 and most recently used as a food service facility for the Houston Independent School District—north of Downtown Houston. The maximum capacity of the new brewery is over 100,000 barrels, compared to 26,000 barrels at the previous location. As of 2015 the brewery is brewing just under 60,000 barrels a year. A large percentage of the brewery’s production capacity is taken up by beer brewed under contract for BJ’s Brewhouse.

Saint Arnold is known for a core lineup, including Lawnmower, a light bodied German Style Kolsch, as well as a traditional American Style IPA, Elissa. In recent years, Saint Arnold has began to step out of the traditional mold it has followed for years. In 2013, they launched two new lines of beers: Icon is a series of more unique beers released four times a year, and Bishop’s Barrel, a special release series sold only in the bottle available only to bars and restaurants. While coming late to the barrel aging game, the Bishop’s Barrel series has been a hit with fans. In the summer of 2014, Saint Arnold released a Berliner Weisse. Very popular with craft beer fans, the slightly sour German style is an extreme and surprising beer for the generally conservative brewery.

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Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Bavik Pilsner German Style Pilsner Sociable and Refreshing None 5.20
Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Bavik Pilsner German Style Pilsner Sociable and Refreshing None 5.20

Glassware

Pilsner

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

1 - 2 / Pale Straw

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Bavik Pilsner

"Bavik Premium Pils has already many awards on its list of achievements. This can be entirely attributed to its traditional brewing process whereby only aroma hops are being used, a long and cold maturation process and where pasteurization is out of the question." Commercial Description

"Bavik Premium Pils has already many awards on its list of achievements. This can be entirely attributed to its traditional brewing process whereby only aroma hops are being used, a long and cold maturation process and where pasteurization is out of the question." Commercial Description

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Style:
German Style Pilsner

Note: Sometimes the name for a style of beer refers to a region or country of origin and can legally describe beers brewed only in that area. At Hay Merchant, we believe names are important in describing a beer and help consumers make educated choices ...

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Note: Sometimes the name for a style of beer refers to a region or country of origin and can legally describe beers brewed only in that area. At Hay Merchant, we believe names are important in describing a beer and help consumers make educated choices. That’s why we categorize beers in literal terms and reference the style, even if they weren’t brewed in a specified region. In order to help add clarity, we will use the word “Style” in the style name to make this distinction. For instance, beers brewed in the style of German Pilsner but not brewed in Germany will be called German Style Pilsner as opposed to German Pilsner.

Pilsner is the dominant beer style in the world today.  All 3 Pilsner sub styles—Czech (Bohemian), German and International—share the same basic flavor profile and the same root history, but German Pilsners are better attenuated and drier then their Czech cousins, showing off more hop bitterness. 


Appearance
Pilsners should be pale straw to golden, and very clear with a frothy, clean white head. Pilsners should look clean, and German Pilsner will be slightly lighter in color then the Czech style. 

Aroma/Flavor
Crispness is the most universal flavor profile for this style. Water type plays a huge role in taste. Pilsners have light malt aromas, a backbone of graininess and a grassy noble hop note. German Pilsners are more earthy and bitter in both aroma and flavor because they use Saaz hops in addition to other European Noble hops, whereas Czech Pilsner uses only Saaz hops.

There are two types of German Pilsner, distinguished by the difference in the water of Northern and Southern Germany. The water in the North is fairly hard, which accentuates bitterness and creates a very hoppy beer—strong, zesty, in-your-face hop bitterness. In Southern Germany, where you will find extremely soft water, the bitterness is suppressed, resulting in more of a mellow hop.

Ingredients
The most common ingredients for this style are 2-row Pilsner malts and German low Alpha hops. 

Glassware/Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, you will most often find Pilsners served in the 20oz Pilsner glass and stored in our lager cooler at 35° F.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of  4.5%-6% (American Pilsners trending toward the higher percentage). This style will have an average IBU range of 25-45 (German Pils trending toward the higher IBU).

History
The story of the Czech Pilsner is really a story about the blending of technology and raw ingredients. The Czech Pilsner was created as a result of the technological revolution that occurred in Germany in the mid-19th century. The style was possible due to advances in refrigeration, transportation, steam and microbiology.

The style originated in the town of Plzen, Czechoslovakia around 1840. The Czech-speaking lands of Bohemia were home to two very important ingredients: very good quality 2-row barley and Saaz hops. For centuries, the Grand Dukes of Bohemia attempted to control the supply of these hops by imposing the death penalty on anyone caught smuggling the Saaz hop rhizomes (root cuttings) out of the region.  

In 1838, an entire season’s worth of beer was poured out in the town square because it was of low quality. The Czechs have always taken their beer very seriously and had little acceptance for bad beer. As a result of this bad batch of beer, in 1840, the town of Plzen voted to build a new brewery that utilized the pressurized steam to heat the brew kettles.

In 1842, Josef Groll was hired to be the brewmaster for this new state-of-the-art brewery. Groll was the son of a Bavarian brewer from just outside Munich. When he got to Pilzen, he borrowed heavily from Bavarian brewers and hired Bavarian assistants and Bavarian barrel makers. He even brought a Bavarian yeast strain with him.  For all his talent as a brewer, Groll was not a well-liked man. His own father called him “the rudest man in Bavaria.” It might have been for his inability to work with other people that led to his contract not being renewed when it expired in 1845. However, in his short tenure in Pilzen, he helped birth the Bohemia and the lager. 

Summary
In summary, the German Pilsner is slightly lighter in color than other Pilsner styles and are more earthy and hitter in aroma and flavor, due to its use of Saaz and other European Boble hops. Water distinguishes the two types of German Pilsner: hard water in Northern Germany accentuates bitterness and creates a very hoppy beer, which the soft water in the South suppresses the bitterness. 

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Brewery:
Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik)

Rijksweg(B) 33
Bavikhove, 8531

http://www.brouwerijdebrabandere.be/home-en

The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other ...

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The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other family members took control of the brewery, changed the name back to Brabandere Brewery and began to open a large number of cafés and pubs. Bradandere expanded its own market base by making the brewery the sole supplier of product to those cafés.

In 1990, the family split the operations of the cafés and the brewery. The brewery was renamed again, this time taking inspiration from the town that had been home to the brewery for almost 100 years—Bavik. Over the next decade, the brewery made some large investments into the brewery itself, modernizing the brewery and expanding capacity, making it one of the largest family-owned breweries in Belgium.

In 2013, the fifth generation of the Brabandere family took over. The decision was made to once again use the family name, and thus the Brabandere Brewery was revived.

In Belgium, beers are traditionally known by their stand alone brand names and not by the brewery name. Brabandere brews  three main brands: Bavik, Wittekerke and Petrus. Bavik is best known for the Pilsner, a light, refreshing, slightly hopped bohemian rendition of the style. Wittekerke is the brand used to sell wheat beers. Petrus is the moniker that adorns the “special” beers—usually higher in alcohol or anything different from the core brand of that particular brewery, not always referring to the same style of beer. The most notable beer from the Petrus line is the Aged Pale: 100 percent pale malts, dry hopped and aged for at least 18 months in large wooden fermenters. This beer is light in body but aggressively sour in taste—a Hay Merchant favorite.

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Odell Brewing Company Brett Barrel Aged Golden Ale Sour Ale Sour and Funky None 7.50
Odell Brewing Company Brett Barrel Aged Golden Ale Sour Ale Sour and Funky None 7.50

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

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Malt Variety

Odell Brewing Company Brett Barrel Aged Golden Ale

A complex sour brett beer that is very unique in that it showcases a wild yeast, clean lactic tartness, and complex wood characters. 

A complex sour brett beer that is very unique in that it showcases a wild yeast, clean lactic tartness, and complex wood characters. 

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Style:
Sour Ale

Brewery:
Odell Brewing Company

800 East Lincoln Avenue
Fort Collins, CO 80524

http://odellbrewing.com/

Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create ...

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Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create quality, hand-crafted, innovative brews.

In 2009, having outgrown every inch and aspect of their previous brewery, Odell doubled its plant size to 45,000 square feet and its beer sold to 45,000 barrels—one barrel per square foot! 

As a regional craft brewery, Odell Brewing is committed to serving the communities in which it distributes by sourcing local raw materials, and through its charitable giving program known as Odell Outreach. Odell Brewing is an award winning brewery, nationally and internationally. 

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Hanssens Artisanaal Cassis Lambic Fresh and Fruity None 6.00
Hanssens Artisanaal Cassis Lambic Fresh and Fruity None 6.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

375mL

SRM Value / Color

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Malt Variety

Hanssens Artisanaal Cassis

Ale Brewed with Black Currants and Matured in Oak Barrels.

Ale Brewed with Black Currants and Matured in Oak Barrels.

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Style:
Lambic

Brewery:
Hanssens Artisanaal

Vroenenbosstraat 15
Dworp, Belgium 1653

Hanssens Artisanaal is the oldest independent geuze blender in the whole world. At Hanssens, no beer is actually brewed! Instead, they pursue a profession that was very important in the history of lambic style beers, they are solely blenders of beer.

Lambic beers are famous ...

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Hanssens Artisanaal is the oldest independent geuze blender in the whole world. At Hanssens, no beer is actually brewed! Instead, they pursue a profession that was very important in the history of lambic style beers, they are solely blenders of beer.

Lambic beers are famous for being "wild fermented". Instead of adding a special yeast strain to cause fermentation, some brewers in the Senne river valley leave the warm, sweet, unfermented beer (called wort) open to the elements. Wild strains of yeast and other micro organisms will then seed the liquid. Normally when brewing beer, a brewers yeast will be used to turn sugar into alcohol and certain flavor elements of the beer. In these wild beers, yeast and others will turn sugar into alcohol, acid, and a huge variety of flavor chemicals. 

Since each batch is different, the beer has to be blended with multiple batches to create a consistent product. Most lambics are created from a mixture of aged sour beer and young, sweeter beer. They are then barrel aged to combine the flavors.

Hanssens takes this a step further, and actually blends batches from different breweries in their area. This used to be a very common practice, but Hanssens is now the oldest remaining blender. They bring to this endeavor a variety of barrels, some up to one hundred years old, and a passion and a love for the tradition of Geuze and Lambics. They will also add whole fruits to some of their beers, to make even more flavorful blends.

Hanssens Bartholomeus, former major of Dworp, started to brew lambic in 1871, in the previous Sint-Antonius brewery. Documents have proven that he continued to brew, from 1896 onwards, in buildings located in the Vroenenbosstraat, Dworp. These premises are still used. 

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Hahn Family Wines Chardonnay Wine Besides Beer None 14.50
Hahn Family Wines Chardonnay Wine Besides Beer None 14.50

Glassware

Wine Glass

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Hahn Family Wines Chardonnay

Tropical aromas of banana, lemongrass, and citrus with subtle notes of vanilla and toasty oak. Bright acidity welcomes the palate, leading to a perfect balance of tropical fruit and baking spices that culminate in a lingering, clean finish.

Tropical aromas of banana, lemongrass, and citrus with subtle notes of vanilla and toasty oak. Bright acidity welcomes the palate, leading to a perfect balance of tropical fruit and baking spices that culminate in a lingering, clean finish.

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Style:
Wine

Brewery:
Hahn Family Wines

37700 Foothill Road
Soledad, CA 93960

https://www.hahnwines.com/

During the 1790s, Spanish missionaries recognized the rare soils and favorable climate of the Santa Lucia Highlands of Monterey and planted grapevines there. Yet nearly two hundred years later when our founder Nicolaus (Nicky) Hahn and his wife Gaby first purchased land in the Highlands ...

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During the 1790s, Spanish missionaries recognized the rare soils and favorable climate of the Santa Lucia Highlands of Monterey and planted grapevines there. Yet nearly two hundred years later when our founder Nicolaus (Nicky) Hahn and his wife Gaby first purchased land in the Highlands, cattle, sheep and horses ranged over the hills. Vineyards were a secondary concern.

Nicky immediately saw that the land he’d purchased was destined for greater things than grazing stock. He wasted no time. In 1980, the Hahns released their first wine from SLH. A mere eight years later, Nicky led the charge to establish SLH as an American Viticultural Area, a dream he saw realized in 1991.

Today, Hahn Family Wines, now run by Nicky and Gaby’s son Philip, owns and sustainably farms 650 acres of estate vineyards in the Santa Lucia Highlands. SLH enjoys worldwide acclaim for the Pinot Noir and Chardonnay made there.

TIMELINE

2007

Hahn launches Lucienne—single-vineyard Pinot Noirs from estate vineyards.

2002

Hahn open its visitor center and tasting room at its SLH winery.

2001

Hahn’s SLH vineyards replanted mostly to Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

1992

Hahn family purchases Lone Oak Vineyard in SLH.

1991

SLH designated an American Viticultural Area.

1990

Hahn family purchases Doctor’s Vineyard in SLH.

1980

Nicky Hahn releases his first vintage of wine.

1979

The Hahn family purchases the Smith and Hook vineyards in Santa Lucia Highlands.

1936

Los Padres National Forest is founded. This vast parkland includes Monterey’s Big Sur Coast along with scenic inland tracts.

1908

President Theodore Roosevelt establishes Pinnacles National Monument in the Gabilan Mountains, the range facing Santa Lucia Highlands.

1810

Mission padres tend a Salinas vineyard that has grown in size to 5,000 vines.

1791

California’s 13th mission is founded at the foot of the Santa Lucia Highlands.

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Eureka Heights Brewing Company Demon Bag American Strong Ale Malty, Toasty, and Nutty None 12.00
Eureka Heights Brewing Company Demon Bag American Strong Ale Malty, Toasty, and Nutty None 12.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

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Malt Variety

Eureka Heights Brewing Company Demon Bag

This Belgian strong ale spent eight glorious months resting in rye whiskey barrels along side a copious amount of sour cherries. The magnificent results have an estery spiciness that is balanced by a soft tartness from the cherries.A very strong and complex Belgian ale ...

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This Belgian strong ale spent eight glorious months resting in rye whiskey barrels along side a copious amount of sour cherries. The magnificent results have an estery spiciness that is balanced by a soft tartness from the cherries.A very strong and complex Belgian ale full of dark fruit flavors.

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Style:
American Strong Ale

Brewery:
Eureka Heights Brewing Company

941 W 18TH ST
Houston, Texas 77008

http://www.eurekaheights.com/

New brewery in the Heights

New brewery in the Heights

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Wasatch Brewery Devastator Doppelbock Malty, Toasty, and Nutty None 8.00
Wasatch Brewery Devastator Doppelbock Malty, Toasty, and Nutty None 8.00

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

20 - 23 / Brown

Original Gravity

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Malt Variety

Wasatch Brewery Devastator

"If you're going to sin,sin big. With 8% alc/vol and a creamy richness, this brew has developed a serious cult following. Imagine that" Commercial Description

"If you're going to sin,sin big. With 8% alc/vol and a creamy richness, this brew has developed a serious cult following. Imagine that" Commercial Description

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Style:
Doppelbock

Doppelbock
Easily recognized by names ending in “-ator,” the Doppelbock is a dark beer with a very strong maltiness. This beer, created by monks in Munich, is not related to the similarly-named Bock style.

Appearance
The appearance ranges from a deep gold to dark brown ...
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Doppelbock
Easily recognized by names ending in “-ator,” the Doppelbock is a dark beer with a very strong maltiness. This beer, created by monks in Munich, is not related to the similarly-named Bock style.

Appearance
The appearance ranges from a deep gold to dark brown color with hints of ruby. A large, creamy, persistent head will vary in color depending on the version.

Aroma/Flavor
The aroma has a very strong maltiness, some with a light caramel flavor from a long boil.  A moderately low fruity aspect (prune, plum or grape) can be present. A slight chocolate flavor can be present in dark versions, while a moderate alcohol aroma may be present. 
The flavor is very rich and malty.  A very slight chocolate flavor is optional in darker flavors. Some of the prune, plum, or grape fruitiness can be present. There will be an impression of alcoholic strength but will be smooth and warming. Most versions are fairly sweet with an impression of attenuation. The mouthfeel is a medium-full to full body. Moderate carbonation and very smooth.

Ingredients
Pils and Vienna malts are the most common ingredients for lighter versions, and Munich malts are used in darker ones. Noble hops are used in all versions. Water can vary from soft to hard. Decoction mashing and long boiling plays an important part of flavor development.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve Dopplebock in an American Pint, and it is stored in our lager cooler at 35°. 

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 7%-10% and an average IBU range of 16-26.
Examples
Great craft examples of this style are Paulaner Salvator and Wasatch Devastator.

History
Contrary to the name, Doppelbock is not historically related to Bock. The name bock is the result of the mispronunciation of the word Einbeck, the town where Bock was developed. Doppelbock was developed in Munich, the first specialty beer brewed by the St. Francis of Paula monks for their Lenten fast. Since they couldn’t eat anything for 46 days, they used the grain normally used to bake bread to brew a strong beer, which they felt cleansed the body and soul. The beer was called Salvator, or Savior, and was originally brewed only for the monks themselves. Eventually the brewery was able to sell the beer to the public. Historically, the beer was brewed to 4% ABV, but over the years the original gravity has not changed, but the final gravity has led to a beer that is dryer and higher in alcohol.  
The term “doppel” or “double” was coined by Munich consumers who compared it to the Bock beers of Einbeck. The name Doppelbock found wide use by the 1850s. Many Doppelbocks have names that end in “-ator” in tribute to the prototypical Salvator. The word bock means Goat in German so it is common to see a goat or a ram on the label.
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Brewery:
Wasatch Brewery

250 Main Street
Park City, UT 84060

https://www.wasatchbeers.com/

When Greg Schirf moved to Utah from Milwaukee in the early '80s, drinking and brewing were all but forbidden. Greg took matters into his own hands and did what any self-respecting Midwesterner would do: He started a brewery. Wasatch was the very first brewery in ...

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When Greg Schirf moved to Utah from Milwaukee in the early '80s, drinking and brewing were all but forbidden. Greg took matters into his own hands and did what any self-respecting Midwesterner would do: He started a brewery. Wasatch was the very first brewery in Utah – and one of the first craft brewers in all of the U.S. – brewing award-winning brews since 1986.

In 1988, Greg Schirf proposed another bill to the Utah Legislature making brewpubs legal in Utah and opened the first brewpub at the top of historic Main Street in the resort town of Park City. Wasatch continues to misbehave, turning out naughty beer after naughty beer year after year.

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11 Below Brewing Company Double Dry Hopped Trade Bait IPA Hop-a-licious 45 6.50
11 Below Brewing Company Double Dry Hopped Trade Bait IPA Hop-a-licious 45 6.50

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

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Malt Variety

11 Below Brewing Company Double Dry Hopped Trade Bait

Not too bitter with a juicy, fruity finish

Not too bitter with a juicy, fruity finish

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Style:
IPA

IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category ...
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IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

Aroma/Taste
A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
Ingredients
IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
Examples
Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

History 
The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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Brewery:
11 Below Brewing Company

6820 Bourgeois Rd
Houston, TX 77066

http://11belowbrewing.com/

11 Below Brewing Co., a new brewery located in North Houston, was founded by three former oil industry professionals, Jeff Handojo, Bryce Baker and Brandon Moss. 

The 10,000-square-foot, 30-barrel brewhouse officially opened in May 2015, with Keenan Zarling as head brewmaster. They launched with ...

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11 Below Brewing Co., a new brewery located in North Houston, was founded by three former oil industry professionals, Jeff Handojo, Bryce Baker and Brandon Moss. 

The 10,000-square-foot, 30-barrel brewhouse officially opened in May 2015, with Keenan Zarling as head brewmaster. They launched with three beers: 7-Iron, a hoppy session; Oso Bueno, an American Amber; and Color Blind, a Red IPA. 

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Shacksbury Cider Dry Cider Cider Besides Beer None 6.50
Shacksbury Cider Dry Cider Cider Besides Beer None 6.50

Glassware

Tulip

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In determination ...

Original Gravity

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Malt Variety

Shacksbury Cider Dry Cider

  • Apple varieties - Jonagold, Spartan, McIntosh, Empire, Ellis Bitters, Browns, Michelin, Somerset Redstreak, and Dabinett
    • Apples grown by Sunrise Orchards in Cornwall, Vermont and Dragon Orchards in Herefordshire, England
  • Apple varieties - Jonagold, Spartan, McIntosh, Empire, Ellis Bitters, Browns, Michelin, Somerset Redstreak, and Dabinett
    • Apples grown by Sunrise Orchards in Cornwall, Vermont and Dragon Orchards in Herefordshire, England
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Style:
Cider

Brewery:
Shacksbury Cider

11 Main St
Vergennes, VT 05491

http://www.shacksbury.com/

Far from ordinary, apples are the most diverse food plant on earth. Unfortunately, only a handful of varieties are cultivated at scale in America, and all of those are designed for eating, not cider making.

At Shacksbury, we believe cider can, and should, be daring ...

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Far from ordinary, apples are the most diverse food plant on earth. Unfortunately, only a handful of varieties are cultivated at scale in America, and all of those are designed for eating, not cider making.

At Shacksbury, we believe cider can, and should, be daring and complex. From gnarled trees on New England farmsteads to Old World orchards in England and Spain, our cider will change the way you think about this amazing fruit.

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Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte Duchesse de Bourgogne Flanders Red Ale Sour and Funky 11 6.00
Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte Duchesse de Bourgogne Flanders Red Ale Sour and Funky 11 6.00

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

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Malt Variety

Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte Duchesse de Bourgogne

Duchesse de Bourgogne from Brouwerij Verhaeghe is the traditional Flemish red ale. This refreshing ale is matured in oak casks; smooth with a rich texture and interplay of passion fruit, and chocolate, and a long, dry and acidic finish. After the first and secondary fermentation ...

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Duchesse de Bourgogne from Brouwerij Verhaeghe is the traditional Flemish red ale. This refreshing ale is matured in oak casks; smooth with a rich texture and interplay of passion fruit, and chocolate, and a long, dry and acidic finish. After the first and secondary fermentation, the beer goes for maturation into the oak barrels for 18 months. The final product is a blend of younger 8 months old beer with 18 months old beer. The average age of the Duchesse de Bourgogne before being bottled is 12 months.

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Style:
Flanders Red Ale

Brewery:
Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte

Koning Albert I-laan 120
Westtoer, Brugge B-8000

https://www.brouwerijverhaeghe.be/

The story of Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte started in 1885 when Paul Verhaeghe set up his brewery and malt works. Polkes’ (little Paul’s) barrel beer quickly Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte
© BeerTourism.com
gained a foothold in the Kortrijk (Courtrai) region.

And soon the brewery was using the railways ...

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The story of Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte started in 1885 when Paul Verhaeghe set up his brewery and malt works. Polkes’ (little Paul’s) barrel beer quickly Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte
© BeerTourism.com
gained a foothold in the Kortrijk (Courtrai) region.

And soon the brewery was using the railways to transport its so-called ‘Blonde de Flandres’ as far as Brussels.

As it did for so many other breweries, the First World War signalled a temporary disruption of the production process in Vichte.

The occupiers dismantled the brewhall to get their hands on precious copper.

New equipment was needed to restart production when the war ended.

During the 1920s the first bottled beer was produced at Verhaeghe.

The brewery managed to survive the Second World War by selling a table beer that was low in alcohol (0.8% ABV).

After the war King Pils reigned everywhere but, in its home region, Brouwerij Verhaeghe bravely rowed against the tide. Though in time they did introduceight from the foeder...
© BeerTourism.com
Sultan Pils, named Vera Pils in later years.

Genuine kriekenbiers like those produced by Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte take their lineage from the tradition of sour Flemish red-brown beers.

The brewery’s main focus today is to maintain the quality of its existing beers and to develop new brews.

Much has happened throughout the years but they have never veered away from this mission.

This family brewery is now owned by brothers , their family’s fourth generation of brewers. Karl is responsible for daily management while Peter is in charge of production.Beer galore...
© BeerTourism.com

Their flagship beer is Duchesse de Bourgogne, matured in oak barrels. Since 1976 this Vichte-based brewery has also been making Caves, the traditional city beer of Lier, which is commissioned by a local guild called the Heren Van Lier.

Nowadays 80% of the entire annual production, amounting to around 1,100,000 litres, is destined for export, in particular to Canada, the USA, Russia, Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan.

Besides Vichtenaar, Duchesse de Bourgogne and Echt Kriekenbier, all of them Flemish red-brown beers, the range includes Barbe and Cambrinus, both top-fermented beers, the Christmas beer Barbe Noël (‘Santa’s Beard’) and Verhaeghe Pils.

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Avery Brewing Company Expletus Wild Ale Advanced Sour-ology None 5.90
Avery Brewing Company Expletus Wild Ale Advanced Sour-ology None 5.90

Glassware

Bottle Size

12oz

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Avery Brewing Company Expletus

Sour ale aged in Tequila Barrels with Cherries. 

Sour ale aged in Tequila Barrels with Cherries. 

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Style:
Wild Ale

Brewery:
Avery Brewing Company

4910 Nautilus Ct
Boulder, CO 80301

http://averybrewing.com/

In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the ...

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In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the Avery Brewing Company in Boulder, Colorado and still acts as president and head brewer. 

Like many of its older craft brew brethren, Avery started out very small. When it opened, the brewery utilized only a seven-barrel tank to ferment, leading to a very low volume of production. In the years since, the brewery has expanded significantly to encompass the entire block of warehouses where it’s located. Even after 21 years, Avery is still a relatively small operation with a limited national footprint.  We’re lucky Avery has been in the Texas market for many years.

These days, Avery is best known for big, extreme beers, but that hasn’t always been the case. The original line-up consisted of an Amber Ale, a Brown and a Dry Stout. It wasn’t until 1995 that Avery released Avery IPA. In 1999, Avery released Hog Heaven, a beer that they still call American Barley Wine to this day, but in reality, Hog Heaven was one of the first Double IPAs in the world.

It was around this time (late 1999 -2003) that Avery’s beer lineup became the heavy hitting powerhouse that it is today.  Reverend the Belgian Quad launched in 2000, Salvation the Belgium Golden in 2002, and in 2003, Czar the Russian Imperial Stout ascended to the throne and is one of Hay Merchant’s favorite Avery beers. Avery’s first experiments with barrel aging began in 2004, along with the release of the Maharaja, a 120 IBU 10.5% monster of an Imperial IPA.

In recent years, Avery has become known for its sour barrel-aged beers. The first beer in the series, Barbant, was released and was limited to 694 cases. It was an ale pitched with Brett and aged for 9 months in Zinfandel barrels. Anvil Bar and Refuge (Hay Merchant’s sister cocktail bar) was one of the only bars in Texas to get a case of this very rare beer.  Over the last few years, Avery has released a few of these beers a year, and each one is different.

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Saint Arnold Brewing Company Fancy Lawnmower German Style Kolsch Sociable and Refreshing 20 4.90
Saint Arnold Brewing Company Fancy Lawnmower German Style Kolsch Sociable and Refreshing 20 4.90

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

1 - 2 / Pale Straw

Original Gravity

11.400 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Hallertau +

Flavor: Very smooth and earthy

Aroma: Earthy noble aroma. Mild but spicy and pleasant

Alpha Acids: 3.5 - 5.5%                   

Beta Acids: 3 - 4%                

Aroma

Hersbruker-German +

Flavor: Smooth and earthy. Not very harsh bitterness

Aroma: Mild earthy and herbal

Alpha Acids: 2 - 5%                         

Beta Acids: 2.5 - 6%             

Aroma

Malt Variety

Saint Arnold Brewing Company Fancy Lawnmower

"A true German-style Kölsch. Originally brewed in Cologne, this beer is crisp and refreshing, yet has a sweet malty body that is balanced by a complex, citrus hop character. Multiple additions of German Hallertauer hops are used to achieve this delicate flavor. We use ...

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"A true German-style Kölsch. Originally brewed in Cologne, this beer is crisp and refreshing, yet has a sweet malty body that is balanced by a complex, citrus hop character. Multiple additions of German Hallertauer hops are used to achieve this delicate flavor. We use a special Kölsch yeast, an ale yeast that ferments at lager temperatures, to yield the slightly fruity, clean flavor of this beer. Fancy Lawnmower Beer is a world class brew yet light enough to be enjoyed by Texans after strenuous activities, like mowing the lawn." Commercial Description

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Style:
German Style Kolsch

Brewery:
Saint Arnold Brewing Company

2000 Lyons Avenue
Houston, TX 77020

http://www.saintarnold.com/

The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have ...

read more

The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have attracted a large following. Saint Arnold has won numerous national and international awards.

Saint Arnold was originally located on the far northwest side of Houston and operated out of that location for more than fifteen years. In 2009, Saint Arnold purchased a three-story 104,000-square-foot brick building—constructed in 1914 and most recently used as a food service facility for the Houston Independent School District—north of Downtown Houston. The maximum capacity of the new brewery is over 100,000 barrels, compared to 26,000 barrels at the previous location. As of 2015 the brewery is brewing just under 60,000 barrels a year. A large percentage of the brewery’s production capacity is taken up by beer brewed under contract for BJ’s Brewhouse.

Saint Arnold is known for a core lineup, including Lawnmower, a light bodied German Style Kolsch, as well as a traditional American Style IPA, Elissa. In recent years, Saint Arnold has began to step out of the traditional mold it has followed for years. In 2013, they launched two new lines of beers: Icon is a series of more unique beers released four times a year, and Bishop’s Barrel, a special release series sold only in the bottle available only to bars and restaurants. While coming late to the barrel aging game, the Bishop’s Barrel series has been a hit with fans. In the summer of 2014, Saint Arnold released a Berliner Weisse. Very popular with craft beer fans, the slightly sour German style is an extreme and surprising beer for the generally conservative brewery.

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Stone Brewing Company Farking Wheaton W00t Stout Russian Imperial Stout Dark and Flavorful 65 13.00
Stone Brewing Company Farking Wheaton W00t Stout Russian Imperial Stout Dark and Flavorful 65 13.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

40 - 50 / Black

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Stone Brewing Company Farking Wheaton W00t Stout

"This righteously flavorful imperial stout has been a favorite among our fans—and us—since its inception in 2013. In celebration of its third brewing, we’ve upped the barrel-aging quotient for 2015, adding to the mix a version of last year’s vintage that ...

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"This righteously flavorful imperial stout has been a favorite among our fans—and us—since its inception in 2013. In celebration of its third brewing, we’ve upped the barrel-aging quotient for 2015, adding to the mix a version of last year’s vintage that we aged in bourbon barrels for a year. This whopping, complex stout will cellar beautifully—if you can wait that long.

Eisner Award-winning comic-book cover artist Dave “The Reverend” Johnson created the fine art for the bottle in exchange for our donation to The Hero Initiative (heroinitiative.org), a charity organization that provides retirement funds for golden-age comic book artists." Commercial Description

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Style:
Russian Imperial Stout

Brewery:
Stone Brewing Company

1999 Citracado Parkway
Escondido, CA 92029

http://www.stonebrewing.com/

Stone Brewing Co. is a brewery headquartered in Escondido, California. Founded in 1996 in San Marcos, California, it is the largest brewery in Southern California.  As of 2012, it was the tenth largest craft brewery in the United States and 17th largest brewery overall, based ...

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Stone Brewing Co. is a brewery headquartered in Escondido, California. Founded in 1996 in San Marcos, California, it is the largest brewery in Southern California.  As of 2012, it was the tenth largest craft brewery in the United States and 17th largest brewery overall, based on sales volume. The brewery is owned by Steve Wagner and craft beer superstar Greg Koch.

The brewery's first beer was Stone Pale Ale, which the company considers to be its flagship ale. However, the brewery is best known for their other core beer, Stone IPA, which is considered the benchmark of the American IPA style.

The Arrogant Bastard line of ales best exhibits the brewery’s overall attitude, consisting of Stone Arrogant Bastard, Stone Double Bastard and Stone Lucky Bastard. A little known fact: owner Greg Koch considers Arrogant Bastard as a brand in its own right and gets very upset when the name Stone is used to describe Arrogant Bastard.

Most of Stone’s beers are characteristic of West Coast craft brews, meaning that they have a high hop content. Compared to the macro-produced lagers, many Stone brews feature alcohol percentages that are well above average. The alcohol-by-volume content of Stone brews ranges from 4.2% to 13%.

Stone Brewing is rated as a "world class brewery" by the two largest beer enthusiast websites, RateBeer and BeerAdvocate. Stone Brewing has been voted by the readers of Beer Advocate as the #1 "All Time Top Brewery on Planet Earth."

Stone opened in San Marcos in 1996 at the location currently home to Port Brewing Company and The Lost Abbey. In 2006, Stone relocated from the original brewery to a new, custom-designed facility in Escondido. In 2013, the company opened a packaging hall just south of the brewery, which houses the bottling and keg lines. The brewery in Escondido produced 213,277 US beer barrels in 2013. The site is also home to a restaurant, Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens - Escondido, an 8,500-square-foot restaurant with a large outdoor patio and an acre of gardens. Stone also operates a 19-acre organic farm known as Stone Farms, just north of the brewery in Escondido, and several other restaurants in California.

In June 2008, Stone Brewing covered the roof of the brewery with solar panels, cutting their energy costs nearly in half. The 1,561 roof-mounted solar modules will offset more than 538,000 pounds of carbon emissions over its lifetime, which is equivalent to planting 204 acres of trees.

In July 2014, Stone Brewing Co. announced plans to open a brewery and restaurant in Berlin, Germany.

In October 2014, Stone Brewing Co. announced the location of its first brewery and destination restaurant in the Eastern United States—Richmond, VA.  The facility is expected to be operation by late 2015 or early 2016. 

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Real Ale Brewing Company Firemans #4 American Blonde Ale Sociable and Refreshing 23 5.10
Real Ale Brewing Company Firemans #4 American Blonde Ale Sociable and Refreshing 23 5.10

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

3 - 3 / Straw

Original Gravity

12.000 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Real Ale Brewing Company Firemans #4

"Named as a tribute to our good friends (and bad ass bike makers) at Fireman Texas Cruzer and because it was the fourth year-round beer we created, Firemans #4 is our most popular and best-selling beer to date. With an ever-drinkable balance of smooth malt ...

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"Named as a tribute to our good friends (and bad ass bike makers) at Fireman Texas Cruzer and because it was the fourth year-round beer we created, Firemans #4 is our most popular and best-selling beer to date. With an ever-drinkable balance of smooth malt and zesty hops, this refreshing blonde is perfect on a hot day or paired with spicy food. It’s no wonder why so many Texans love it." Commercial Description

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Style:
American Blonde Ale

American Blonde Ale

Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

Appearance
The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
Aroma/Flavor
Blonde Ales have ...
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American Blonde Ale

Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

Appearance
The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
Aroma/Flavor
Blonde Ales have a light to moderate sweet malty aroma with low to moderate fruitiness.
The flavor has an initial malty sweetness but optionally some bready, toasty or biscuit-like flavor. With a light to moderate hop flavor and low to medium bitterness, the finish is medium-dry to somewhat sweet. The mouthfeel is medium light to medium body with medium to high carbonation.

Ingredients
 Usually, Blonde Ales use 100% malted barley, but sometimes as much as 25% wheat malt can be used. This beer can also be hopped with any hop. 

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve Blonde Ale in an American Pint, and it's stored in our lager cooler at 35°. 

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 3.5%-5.5% and an average IBU range of 15-28.
Examples
Great craft examples of this style are Southern Star Bombshell Blonde Ale and Real Ale Fireman’s #4.

History
Blonde Ale is a modern American take on the old American cream style ale style, which were brewed by ale breweries to compete against larger producers in pre-Prohibition Northeast and Mid-Atlanta America.  Cream ales were not 100% malted barley, but contained a percentage of corn.  Blonde Ales are also called Golden Ales, but should not be confused with Belgian-Style Golden Ales.
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Brewery:
Real Ale Brewing Company

231 San Saba Ct
Blanco, TX 78606

http://realalebrewing.com/

Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

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Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

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Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats Fort Fruited Ale Oddly Delicious 49 17.00
Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats Fort Fruited Ale Oddly Delicious 49 17.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats Fort

Style:
Fruited Ale

Brewery:
Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats

320 Rehoboth Ave
Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971

http://www.dogfish.com/

The story of Dogfish Head began in June of 1995 when they opened Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats, the Delaware's first brewpub. The plan was to bring original beer, original food and original music to the area.

Not only was Dogfish Head Delaware’s first ...

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The story of Dogfish Head began in June of 1995 when they opened Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats, the Delaware's first brewpub. The plan was to bring original beer, original food and original music to the area.

Not only was Dogfish Head Delaware’s first brewpub, it was the smallest commercial brewery in America. Their very first batch, Shelter Pale Ale, was brewed on a system which essentially was three little kegs with propane burners underneath. Brewing 12–gallon batches of beer for a whole restaurant proved to be more than a full time job. When the doors to the pub first opened, they brewed three times a day, five days a week. The one benefit to brewing on such a small system was the ability to try out a myriad of different recipes. 

The beer wasn't the brewpub’s only draw. The pub's menu centered on a wood-burning grill. Dogfish Head soon became known as the place to enjoy fresh grilled seafood, burgers, pizzas and sandwiches. The wood–burning grill imparts a unique flavor to everything on the menu, whether it's a hearty sandwich, a delicate piece of fish or signature pizza dough.

With the popularity of the pub growing, it was quickly apparent that the 12–gallon brewery would not keep up with demand. Dogfish Head built a new brewery and underwent a thirty-fold expansion of the brew house.

The reputation of Dogfish Head ales quickly grew beyond Delaware's borders. Calls from Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and beyond poured in, as thirsty restaurant patrons demanded their favorite beach beer at home. They began bottling Shelter Pale Ale in 1996 and just one year later, they expanded again. This time, they separated the packaging operation from the restaurant. By 1999, they were up to five year–round bottled brands in about a dozen states.

Dogfish Head outgrew their distributing brewery in a couple years and, in the summer of 2002, they moved their entire production brewery up the road to Milton, Del., into a 100,000-square-foot converted cannery. Around the same time, they built a distillery on the second floor of their Rehoboth Beach brewpub to make vodka, rum and gin.

Dogfish Head now brews nearly 20 styles of beer that are sold in more than 25 states, as well as a half-dozen kinds of hand-crafted spirits.

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Avery Brewing Company Fortuna Wild Ale Advanced Sour-ology None 8.11
Avery Brewing Company Fortuna Wild Ale Advanced Sour-ology None 8.11

Glassware

Bottle Size

12oz

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Avery Brewing Company Fortuna

Sour ale that is aged in Tequila barrels with lime zest and salt.

Sour ale that is aged in Tequila barrels with lime zest and salt.

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Style:
Wild Ale

Brewery:
Avery Brewing Company

4910 Nautilus Ct
Boulder, CO 80301

http://averybrewing.com/

In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the ...

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In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the Avery Brewing Company in Boulder, Colorado and still acts as president and head brewer. 

Like many of its older craft brew brethren, Avery started out very small. When it opened, the brewery utilized only a seven-barrel tank to ferment, leading to a very low volume of production. In the years since, the brewery has expanded significantly to encompass the entire block of warehouses where it’s located. Even after 21 years, Avery is still a relatively small operation with a limited national footprint.  We’re lucky Avery has been in the Texas market for many years.

These days, Avery is best known for big, extreme beers, but that hasn’t always been the case. The original line-up consisted of an Amber Ale, a Brown and a Dry Stout. It wasn’t until 1995 that Avery released Avery IPA. In 1999, Avery released Hog Heaven, a beer that they still call American Barley Wine to this day, but in reality, Hog Heaven was one of the first Double IPAs in the world.

It was around this time (late 1999 -2003) that Avery’s beer lineup became the heavy hitting powerhouse that it is today.  Reverend the Belgian Quad launched in 2000, Salvation the Belgium Golden in 2002, and in 2003, Czar the Russian Imperial Stout ascended to the throne and is one of Hay Merchant’s favorite Avery beers. Avery’s first experiments with barrel aging began in 2004, along with the release of the Maharaja, a 120 IBU 10.5% monster of an Imperial IPA.

In recent years, Avery has become known for its sour barrel-aged beers. The first beer in the series, Barbant, was released and was limited to 694 cases. It was an ale pitched with Brett and aged for 9 months in Zinfandel barrels. Anvil Bar and Refuge (Hay Merchant’s sister cocktail bar) was one of the only bars in Texas to get a case of this very rare beer.  Over the last few years, Avery has released a few of these beers a year, and each one is different.

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Saint Arnold Brewing Company French Press American Porter Cask Conditioned None 9.40
Saint Arnold Brewing Company French Press American Porter Cask Conditioned None 9.40

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Saint Arnold Brewing Company French Press

French Press is an Imperial Coffee Porter. For the coffee, we reunited with our local friends at Java Pura Coffee Roasters. The Espresso blend we used in this brew is the same one we used in our previous coffee beers: Icon Blue – Coffee Porter and ...

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French Press is an Imperial Coffee Porter. For the coffee, we reunited with our local friends at Java Pura Coffee Roasters. The Espresso blend we used in this brew is the same one we used in our previous coffee beers: Icon Blue – Coffee Porter and Bishop’s Barrel No. 14.

This beer has a bold chocolate and coffee flavor and aroma with a balanced roast bitterness and mild sweetness. It finishes with a nice balance of coffee and a slight chocolaty sweetness that doesn’t build and keeps you coming back for another sip.

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Style:
American Porter

Porter
Porter is a dark style of beer developed in London from well-hopped beers made from brown malt.
Appearance
Porters are medium brown to very dark brown, often with ruby or garnet-like highlights. They can approach black in color. Clarity may be difficult to discern ...
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Porter
Porter is a dark style of beer developed in London from well-hopped beers made from brown malt.
Appearance
Porters are medium brown to very dark brown, often with ruby or garnet-like highlights. They can approach black in color. Clarity may be difficult to discern in such a dark beer, but when not opaque, it will be clear (particularly when held up to the light). There is a full, tan-colored head with moderately good head retention.

Aroma/Taste
A roasty aroma—often with a lightly burnt, black malt character—is noticeable and may be moderately strong. Optionally, it may also show some additional malt character in support (grainy, bready, toffee-like, caramelly, chocolate, coffee, rich, and/or sweet). Hop aroma is low to high (U.S. or U.K. varieties). Some American versions may be dry-hopped. Fruity esters are moderate to none. Diacetyl is low to none.
Moderately strong malt flavor usually features a lightly burnt, black malt character (and sometimes chocolate and/or coffee flavors) with a bit of roasty dryness in the finish. Overall flavor may finish from dry to medium-sweet, depending on grist composition, hop bittering level and attenuation. It may have a sharp character from dark roasted grains, although taste is not overly acrid, burnt or harsh. There is medium to high bitterness, which can be accentuated by the roasted malt. Hop flavor can vary from low to moderately high (U.S. or U.K. varieties) and balances the roasted malt flavors. Diacetyl is low to none. Fruity esters are moderate to none. It has medium to medium-full body and moderately low to moderately high carbonation. Stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth. It may have a slight astringency from roasted grains, although this character is not strong. 
Ingredients
Porters may contain several malts, prominently dark roasted malts and grains, which often include black patent malt (chocolate malt and/or roasted barley may also be used in some versions). Hops are used for bittering, flavor and/or aroma, and are frequently found in U.K. or U.S. varieties. Water with moderate to high carbonate hardness is typical. Ale yeast can either be clean in U.S. versions or characterful in English varieties.
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 4%-7% and an average IBU range of 25-50.
Examples
Great examples of this style are Anchor Porter, Deschutes Black Butte and (512) Pecan porter.

History 
Porter has a very distinct origin and reason for being created. There were three types of beer available in London in the early 1700s: Strong ale, Common Ale and Stale Ale. Common Ale was the “running beer,” made after a Strong Ale in the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength). Stale Ale was what was left in a cask after it had gone stale. These three types of beer were very inconsistent. In order to create a consistent product, they were often all mixed together to order and called “Three Threads.” In 1722, Ralph Harwood, Proprietor of The Bell Brewhouse, created a beer that had all the characteristics of three threads but was from one cask. It was nicknamed Porter by the Publicans because Porters were his best customers for the new beer.
Porter was the beer that allowed England to creep ahead of other countries in the brewing world. It was inexpensive to brew and was able to age. It was a beer for and from the industrial revolution. The most successful Porter brewer of the 1700s was Samuel Whitbread of London, who started brewing in 1742.
Porter was commonly imported to the American Colonies until the 1760s, when tensions rose between England and the colonies, and American brewers had to take up the slack. Porter was George Washington's preferred beer.
In 1817, with the advent of Black Patent Malt, Porter gained its darker color and went from a brown beer to a black beer. Guinness actually started as a porter brewer before stouts branched off of Porters and were among the first to use Black Patent Malt.
Porter was a major part of the beer industry in England from its inception. Though, starting in the 1830s, its popularity declined as many people started drinking more pale ale and Gin. By the 1930s English Porter a had almost entirely disappeared.  It finally disappeared in Ireland in 1972.
There has been a renaissance of Porter in recent years due to the growing craft beer scene in America.  Yuengling, however, has made porter since the 1870s (other than the interruption of prohibition) and still makes Porter today.
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Brewery:
Saint Arnold Brewing Company

2000 Lyons Avenue
Houston, TX 77020

http://www.saintarnold.com/

The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have ...

read more

The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have attracted a large following. Saint Arnold has won numerous national and international awards.

Saint Arnold was originally located on the far northwest side of Houston and operated out of that location for more than fifteen years. In 2009, Saint Arnold purchased a three-story 104,000-square-foot brick building—constructed in 1914 and most recently used as a food service facility for the Houston Independent School District—north of Downtown Houston. The maximum capacity of the new brewery is over 100,000 barrels, compared to 26,000 barrels at the previous location. As of 2015 the brewery is brewing just under 60,000 barrels a year. A large percentage of the brewery’s production capacity is taken up by beer brewed under contract for BJ’s Brewhouse.

Saint Arnold is known for a core lineup, including Lawnmower, a light bodied German Style Kolsch, as well as a traditional American Style IPA, Elissa. In recent years, Saint Arnold has began to step out of the traditional mold it has followed for years. In 2013, they launched two new lines of beers: Icon is a series of more unique beers released four times a year, and Bishop’s Barrel, a special release series sold only in the bottle available only to bars and restaurants. While coming late to the barrel aging game, the Bishop’s Barrel series has been a hit with fans. In the summer of 2014, Saint Arnold released a Berliner Weisse. Very popular with craft beer fans, the slightly sour German style is an extreme and surprising beer for the generally conservative brewery.

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Great Heights Brewing Company Fruity Pellets IPA Hop-a-licious 17 6.20
Great Heights Brewing Company Fruity Pellets IPA Hop-a-licious 17 6.20

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Amarillo +

Flavor: Citrus notes, specifically orange and grapefruit.

Aroma: Lots of orange peel.

Alpha Acids: 8.0 - 11.0%                 

Beta Acids: 6.0% - 7.0%      

Dual Purpose

Citra +

Flavor: Lemon/lime and tropical fruitiness.

Aroma: Very clean citrus aroma.

Alpha Acids: 10 - 14%         

Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

Aroma

Mosaic +

Flavor: Tropical fruits and blueberry notes

Aroma: Complex tropical flavors with some citrus and berry notes.

Alpha Acids: 11.5 - 13.5%               

Beta Acids: 3.2 - 3.9%          

Aroma

Malt Variety

Great Heights Brewing Company Fruity Pellets

Wheat and flaked oats produce a hazy beer with a soft, creamy mouthfeel. Citra, Mosaic, and Amarillo hops are added liberally post-boil, contributing massive citrus and tropical aromas without the traditional hop bitterness. 

Wheat and flaked oats produce a hazy beer with a soft, creamy mouthfeel. Citra, Mosaic, and Amarillo hops are added liberally post-boil, contributing massive citrus and tropical aromas without the traditional hop bitterness. 

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Style:
IPA

IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category ...
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IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

Aroma/Taste
A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
Ingredients
IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
Examples
Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

History 
The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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Brewery:
Great Heights Brewing Company

938 Wakefield Drive
Houston, TX 77018

https://www.greatheightsbrewing.com/

We're just a couple of guys living the dream of quitting desk jobs and ditching long hours at the office for even longer hours at the brewery—we couldn't be happier. Swing by our neighborhood taproom and say hi and cheers with us!

We're just a couple of guys living the dream of quitting desk jobs and ditching long hours at the office for even longer hours at the brewery—we couldn't be happier. Swing by our neighborhood taproom and say hi and cheers with us!

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Real Ale Brewing Company Full Tilt Boogie American Barley Wine Malty, Toasty, and Nutty 45 10.00
Real Ale Brewing Company Full Tilt Boogie American Barley Wine Malty, Toasty, and Nutty 45 10.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Real Ale Brewing Company Full Tilt Boogie

Malty on the sweet side with a hoppy presence. A little roasty and slightly smoky on the back end.

Malty on the sweet side with a hoppy presence. A little roasty and slightly smoky on the back end.

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Style:
American Barley Wine

American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
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American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

About Strong Ales
Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
Appearance
The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

Aroma/Taste
The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
Ingredients
Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
Examples
Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

History 
This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
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Brewery:
Real Ale Brewing Company

231 San Saba Ct
Blanco, TX 78606

http://realalebrewing.com/

Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

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Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

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Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales Gammaredux Sour Pale Ale Sour and Funky 55 7.30
Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales Gammaredux Sour Pale Ale Sour and Funky 55 7.30

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales Gammaredux

Style:
Sour Pale Ale

Brewery:
Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales

311 S. Main St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104

http://www.jollypumpkin.com/jp/home

Ron Jeffries founded Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in 2004 in Dexter, Michigan. It operates two pubs, one in Ann Arbor and the other in Traverse City. Jolly Pumpkin produces a variety of unfiltered and unpasteurized "rustic country" beers.

Jolly Pumpkin ages their beers in wine ...

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Ron Jeffries founded Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in 2004 in Dexter, Michigan. It operates two pubs, one in Ann Arbor and the other in Traverse City. Jolly Pumpkin produces a variety of unfiltered and unpasteurized "rustic country" beers.

Jolly Pumpkin ages their beers in wine barrels, which contain naturally occurring microbiological cultures including brettanomyces. These cultures produce a complex flavor profile in their beers, which includes flavors described as leathery, earthy, wild, funky, or even "sweaty horse hair character,” which may approximate how beer tasted before the advent of pasteurization and industrialization. This style of beer has been described as "farmhouse ale" or American Wild Ale. Jolly Pumpkin was not the first brewery in the U.S. to start brewing these styles, but it is one of the most well known.

Their year-round productions include Oro de Calabaza, La Roja, Calabaza Blanca, Bam Biere, and Bam Noire.  Their seasonal beers include Madrugada Obscura “Dark Dawn”, Biere de Mars, E.S. Bam, Luciernaga “The Firefly” Weizen Bam Miere, La Parcela, Fuego del Otono, Noel de Calabaza, Marcaibo Especial, and Perseguidor.

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Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co. Ginger Melon Mule American Blonde Ale Sociable and Refreshing 14 5.80
Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co. Ginger Melon Mule American Blonde Ale Sociable and Refreshing 14 5.80

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co. Ginger Melon Mule

Style:
American Blonde Ale

American Blonde Ale

Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

Appearance
The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
Aroma/Flavor
Blonde Ales have ...
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American Blonde Ale

Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

Appearance
The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
Aroma/Flavor
Blonde Ales have a light to moderate sweet malty aroma with low to moderate fruitiness.
The flavor has an initial malty sweetness but optionally some bready, toasty or biscuit-like flavor. With a light to moderate hop flavor and low to medium bitterness, the finish is medium-dry to somewhat sweet. The mouthfeel is medium light to medium body with medium to high carbonation.

Ingredients
 Usually, Blonde Ales use 100% malted barley, but sometimes as much as 25% wheat malt can be used. This beer can also be hopped with any hop. 

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve Blonde Ale in an American Pint, and it's stored in our lager cooler at 35°. 

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 3.5%-5.5% and an average IBU range of 15-28.
Examples
Great craft examples of this style are Southern Star Bombshell Blonde Ale and Real Ale Fireman’s #4.

History
Blonde Ale is a modern American take on the old American cream style ale style, which were brewed by ale breweries to compete against larger producers in pre-Prohibition Northeast and Mid-Atlanta America.  Cream ales were not 100% malted barley, but contained a percentage of corn.  Blonde Ales are also called Golden Ales, but should not be confused with Belgian-Style Golden Ales.
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Brewery:
Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co.

5301 Nolda Street
Houston, TX 77007

http://www.buffbrew.com/

Buffalo Bayou Brewery was founded in 2012 in Houston by Rassul Zarinfar, a Harvard MBA with experience in beer distribution, and brewer Ryan Robertson. The brewery honors the Houston community by incorporating local ingredients from farms and nearby vendors.

Buff Brew's Heritage Series combines ...

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Buffalo Bayou Brewery was founded in 2012 in Houston by Rassul Zarinfar, a Harvard MBA with experience in beer distribution, and brewer Ryan Robertson. The brewery honors the Houston community by incorporating local ingredients from farms and nearby vendors.

Buff Brew's Heritage Series combines classical brewing techniques and rich Houston flavors, inspired by the history of Houston. Traditional recipes are transformed and redefined as vintage flavors are combined in new ways. The flagship beer of the Heritage Series is 1836, described as a "copper ale," named after Houston's founding year.  The beer is a combination of sweet and toasty Victory malts and earthy, woody, floral American hops. 

Single batch and anti-session, the Secessionist Series of beers are tributes to the revolutionary acts of sedition of Houston's mutineers. The ambitious and boundary-pushing ingredients are inspired by the city's most challenging conditions. 

The brewery is located in central Houston in the Heights neighborhood and offers brewery tours on Saturdays. 

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Van Steenberge Gulden Draak Belgian Strong Dark Belgian Inspiration None 10.50
Van Steenberge Gulden Draak Belgian Strong Dark Belgian Inspiration None 10.50

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

23.000 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Van Steenberge Gulden Draak

"

Did you know the Gulden Draak (Golden Dragon) owes its name to the gilded statue on top of the Belfry in Ghent?

The legend says the gilded dragon first featured on the prow of the ship with which the Norwegian king Sigrid Magnusson left on ...

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"

Did you know the Gulden Draak (Golden Dragon) owes its name to the gilded statue on top of the Belfry in Ghent?

The legend says the gilded dragon first featured on the prow of the ship with which the Norwegian king Sigrid Magnusson left on a crusade in 1111. He offered the statue to the emperor of Constantinople (the current Istanbul) to put it on the cupola of the Aya Sophia. Some hundred years later, the Flemish count Baldwin IX had the showpiece transported to our regions. Here, the Norwegian dragon ended up in the hands of Bruges. After the battle on the field of Beverhout in 1382, the inhabitants of Ghent took the dragon as war booty and put it on top of their Belfry. In the Belfry all communal charters were kept. The dragon had to protect these documents and it was also the symbol of the freedom and might of the city.

Such an imposing symbol that has lasted for over 6 centuries needs an equally imposing beer. Like the dragon shines at the top of the city, the Gulden Draak is part of the international top of beers. It is a dark triple, which in itself makes it an exceptional beer. But it is the complex taste with hints of caramel, roasted malt and coffee in combination with the creamy hazel head that makes it unique. It is a beer that is worthy of its name.

Like the other special beers of the Brewery Van Steenberge, Gulden Draak is a high fermentation beer with secondary fermentation. For the secondary fermentation, wine yeast is used. This also contributes to the unparalleled taste.

And of course, a unique beer deserves a unique presentation. That’s why Gulden Draak is presented in a white bottle. The white bottle, the black banner, the golden dragon and the red letters, constitute a stylish result that has no equal among the many Belgian special beers.

Gulden Draak can be drunk as an aperitif or dessert, or whenever you have the time to sit back and relax. But this barley wine is also perfect with and in stews, especially the Ghent variety. It is also a plus in sauces for red meat, such as a bordelaise. It is particularly suited as a dessert beer, especially in combination with dark chocolate." -Commercial Description

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Style:
Belgian Strong Dark

Brewery:
Van Steenberge

Lindenlaan 25
Ertvelde, B-9940

http://www.vansteenberge.com/en/

Like many others of its kind, this brewery originated from a ploughland farm, that was also engaged in brewing beer for its own consumption. The first time this brewery was mentioned on paper was in 1784 under the name of "Brouwerij De Peer." It is ...

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Like many others of its kind, this brewery originated from a ploughland farm, that was also engaged in brewing beer for its own consumption. The first time this brewery was mentioned on paper was in 1784 under the name of "Brouwerij De Peer." It is very likely however, that there had been a brewery long before that time but that the farmer, John Baptist De Bruin, a native of the village 'St. Kruis Winkel' which is located not too far from the brewery, did not leave any written documents behind until that point in time.

Gradually, brewing became the farm's main pursuit and eventually all agricultural activities were abandoned between the two World Wars. After John Baptist's death, his widow, Angelina Petronella Schelfout, continued the business. From 1876 on, her nephew Jozef Schelfout gave her a helping hand. The brewery was extended with a malting house and a hops field. Indeed, many inhabitants of Ertvelde, the village where the brewery is located, can remember the two-acres field that belonged to the brewery.

Jozef Schelfout's daughter, Magaretha, married Paul van Steenberge, who became mayor of Ertvelde and even Senator in the Belgian Parliament. It was Paul, who eventually changed the brewery's name into "Brouwerij Bios," Bios meaning life. The beer in stock was labeled "Bios": it was a mixture of young beer weakened with a two year old brew. This style of beer today is called: old Brown. The brewer named the beer "Vlaamse Bourgogne" (Flemisch Burgundy), a proper name for such fine quality beer.

In order to comply with changes in common taste, bottom fermentation was introduced. A new brand was born: "Leute Bock", (Leute = Joy) but a commercial name seemed more suitable, and it became SPARTA PILS. The feasibility of this rather expensive switch to lager, depended entirely on the enormous success of the Flemish Burgundy that paid for the investment: better cooling, new lagering tanks in aluminum. On top of that, the old fashioned barrels were to be replaced by glass bottles!

After WW I, the brewery started the production of lemonade. Mr. Jozef Van Steenberge (son of Paul and brewer till 1990) shepherded his business through the crisis of WW II. A war that unfortunately meant the end of hundreds of Flemish village breweries.

Due to the prospering of regional beers, the brewery knew a tremendous uplift. In 1978, the brewery was able to get hold of the recipe and yeasts from the Augustiner monks in Gent, who decided to stop brewing and license the beer out to the Van Steenberge brewery. The brew-engineer at that time, Mr. De Vroe, refined the AUGUSTIJN ale, and turned it into the show-piece of de Van Steenberge brewery. Today, this beer and other special artisanal beers like the Piraat, Gulden Draak, Bruegel and Bornem, all of top-fermentation, make the brewery grow continuously.

In 1990, Mr. Paul Van Steenberge (Joseph's son) took over the mash staff and the brewery. Enormous investments allowed the brewery to follow the technological evolution closely. By the end of 1992, this resulted in the installation of a completely computerized and automated brewery: a real masterpiece. The first in Belgium at that time.

Where is the brewery today? Last year they produced about 35,000 barrels (50,000 HL) of beer with 31 people. Most of the production is sold in Belgium. The export brings the beer all over the world. The top export market is Italy, followed by Holland and the USA. Then comes France, Spain, Switzerland, Germany and other countries.

The mission of the brewery is to brew an exceptional world class beer product, and to stay independent.

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Live Oak Brewing Company Hefeweizen Hefeweizen Sociable and Refreshing 12 5.20
Live Oak Brewing Company Hefeweizen Hefeweizen Sociable and Refreshing 12 5.20

Glassware

Pilsner

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

3 - 3 / Straw

Original Gravity

12.900 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Live Oak Brewing Company Hefeweizen

"Modeled after the classic wheat beers of Bavaria, Hefeweizen is cloudy and straw-colored with a meringue-like head that lingers to the bottom of the glass. Brewed with an ample volume of wheat malt and few hops, this beer features a unique yeast strain that produces ...

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"Modeled after the classic wheat beers of Bavaria, Hefeweizen is cloudy and straw-colored with a meringue-like head that lingers to the bottom of the glass. Brewed with an ample volume of wheat malt and few hops, this beer features a unique yeast strain that produces harmonious notes of clove, banana, and vanilla throughout this effervescent brew. A traditional interpretation of a classic style, this idiosyncratic Bavarian beer is perfectly at home here in Texas." Commercial Description

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Style:
Hefeweizen

The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably) the ...

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The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably) the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat. Weissbier is German for “white beer.” Weissbiers were much paler than the dark beers that were so popular in Bavaria in earlier times, so the word “white” is used relatively. By today’s standards, Weissbier is more golden due to the development of light beers like Pilsner and Helles.

The terms Hefe Weissbier or Hefe Weizen refer to any Weissbier that has yeast (Hefe) in it (i.e., a bottle-conditioned Weissbier). Outside Bavaria, most wheat beers are called Hefeweizen regardless of the yeast content or flavor profile. This practice is becoming less frequent as the American beer drinker becomes more savvy. We use the name Hefeweizen to describe a very specific German style of top fermenting wheat beer.

Appearance 
The appearance of Hefeweizen is pale straw to very dark gold in color. A good amount of haziness should be expected and is appropriate. A very thick, mousse-like, long lasing white head is characteristic.

Aroma/Flavor
The aroma has moderate to strong phenols and fruity esters. Noble hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma may be present. Acceptable aromatics can include a light, citrusy tartness, a light to moderate vanilla character and a low bubblegum and banana aroma.

The flavor is a low to moderately strong banana and clove flavor. The balance and intensity of the phenol and ester components can vary.  A very light to moderate vanilla character or low bubblegum notes can accentuate the banana flavor. The soft, bready or grainy flavor of wheat is complementary. Hop flavor is low to none. A tart, citrusy character from yeast and high carbonation is often present. Well rounded with dry finish.

The mouthfeel is medium-light to medium body.  The texture of wheat imparts the sensation of a fluffy, creamy fullness that may progress to a light, spritzy finish aided by high carbonation. Overall, a pale, spicy, fruity, refreshing wheat-based ale should be expected

Ingredients 
According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat.

Glassware and Serving Temperature 
At Hay Merchant we serve this style in a 20oz German Pilsner glass from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

Stats 
Beers of this style are most often 4.3% - 5.6% ABV and 8-15 IBU. 

Examples 
Beers like Live Oak Hefeweizen, and Weihenstephaner Hefe Weissbier are great examples of the style. 

History 
By the end of the middle ages in Germany, both barley and wheat were being used to make a top-fermented beer. The first true Weissbiers were made toward the end of the 15th century. In 1602, Duke Maximilian I placed a ban on public Weissbier brewing, and the Bavarian House of Dukes became the only body with the legal authority to brew Weissbiers. The profits from Prince Maximilian’s Weiss brewing helped fund the Thirty Years War.

As the popularity of Weissbier waned, the German House of Dukes begin to outsource the reasonability to brew to the private sector around the early part of the 1800s but still maintained control.

But the move to private brewing would not be enough to save Weissbier from extinction.  In 1855, Georg Schneider bought Wesses Brauhaus in Munich. In 1872, he worked a deal that ended the 250 year reign of royal brewing and allowed him to operate under his own terms. Even still, it wasn’t until the end of World War II that Weissbier regained its place as the No. 1 beer in Germany. Weissbier accounts for around 22 percent of the German market. It’s is the No. 1 selling micro-brewed style in Australia and can be found in the lineup of many American microbreweries.

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Brewery:
Live Oak Brewing Company

3301 E 5th St
Austin, TX 78702

http://liveoakbrewing.com/

The Live Oak Brewing Company, located in Austin, Texas since 1997, is a locally owned and operated brewery. Founder Chip McElroy can still be seen at the brewery almost every day.

Live Oak is best known for their traditional German style lagers. They also produce ...

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The Live Oak Brewing Company, located in Austin, Texas since 1997, is a locally owned and operated brewery. Founder Chip McElroy can still be seen at the brewery almost every day.

Live Oak is best known for their traditional German style lagers. They also produce a very good year-round IPA (often available on cask at Hay Merchant), as well as an amazing English Barley Wine. The brewery produces four year-round beers as well as four seasonal (or special release) beers. Live Oak beers are only available on draft.

While Live Oak uses industry standard step mashing for most of their beers, they use a more difficult and rarely used old-world style of mashing known as decoction mashing for a few of their beers, most notably the Live Oak Pilz and the Oaktoberfest. Live Oak uses large dairy tanks as fermenting vessels instead of the more traditional cylindroconical fermenters.

The brewery is currently run out of an old industrial building in Southeast Austin. Recently, the company purchased 20 acres of undeveloped land on the Colorado river just north of the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport on which to build a new brewery, estimated to take "a couple of years” to complete. When this expansion is completed, it is expected that they will add a bottling line.

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Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier Helles Helles Sociable and Refreshing 30 4.30
Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier Helles Helles Sociable and Refreshing 30 4.30

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

11.500 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier Helles

"“Schlenkerla Helles” is brewed with fine Bavarian aroma hops from the area around the city of Nürnberg. It's lagered in century old caves underneath the historic Schlenkerla brewery and maltings. Schlenkerla Helles is boiled in the same copper kettles and bottom fermented by ...

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"“Schlenkerla Helles” is brewed with fine Bavarian aroma hops from the area around the city of Nürnberg. It's lagered in century old caves underneath the historic Schlenkerla brewery and maltings. Schlenkerla Helles is boiled in the same copper kettles and bottom fermented by the same yeast as the historic Schlenkerla Smokebeer. Its subtle smokiness without using smoke malt makes “Helles Schlenkerla Lager” a unique representative of the classic lager beer style “Bavarian Helles”" Commercial Description

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Style:
Helles

Helles
Developed by Bavarians in response to the popularity of Bohemian Pilsner, Helles means “pale” in German. It’s clean and balanced, with a light color. 
Appearance 
Helles beer has a pale straw color and is clear with a thick, long lasting head.

Aroma/Flavor ...
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Helles
Developed by Bavarians in response to the popularity of Bohemian Pilsner, Helles means “pale” in German. It’s clean and balanced, with a light color. 
Appearance 
Helles beer has a pale straw color and is clear with a thick, long lasting head.

Aroma/Flavor
Helles has a clean, mild malt-accented aromas.  It may be slightly sulfurous. 

The style is clean, balanced and delicate.  It’s medium bodied—the relatively high protein levels contribute to a fuller body than might be expected from its color. There is muted hop character.  The water in Southern Bavaria is medium hard, and the harder the water, the more perceived hop bitterness.  The finish is malty and dry, but not astringent. 

Ingredients 
The foundation of Helles is North American two-row or Pils pale malt based on Harrington or Klages.  They give Helles its body, pale color and light flavor. Noble hop varieties can include Hallertauer Muttelfruh, Tettnanger and Hersbrucker or North American Mt. Hood.  Any hop varieties that add strong, spicy, citrus, acrid, floral or piney notes must not be used, as these would ruin the balanced flavor profile of Helles. 
Bavarian-style lager yeast of the Saccharomyces uvarum family are used, which are slow acting and contain some clarifying agents.  Helles can be made with only one variety of hop and one variety of malt, but must be of higher quality that are native to the Bavarian region. 
Helles is lagered near the freezing point between 4 to 6 weeks on the yeast to bring out its delicacy and softness.  This allows the yeast to reabsorb its less attractive metabolic byproducts, including the small amount of diacetyl—the flavor compound found in most beers imparting butterscotch characteristics—it produces. It also prevents the oxidation of ethanol into aldehydes, which can give the beer an undesirable green apple aroma and allows the beer to keep longer. 
Glassware and Serving Temperature 
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

Stats
Beers of this style are most often 4.7%-5.4% ABV and 18-25 IBU. 

Example
Great examples of this style are Victory Lager and Saint Arnold Summer Pils. 

History 
Bavarian brewing laws have played an important role in bringing about the Helles style.  The influential 1516 Reinheitsgebot demanded that brewers use only barley, hops and water (yeast was not yet understood), and the 1553 summer brewing prohibition that prohibited brewing in the summer months had the unintended consequence of making all Bavarian brews lagers since ale yeasts stayed dormant during the cold months when brewing was allowed. 
Clearer, lighter beers became more popular as Bavarians made a late transition from traditional gray beer steins called Keferlohers to modern glassware. This was initially met with resistance from traditionalists who only considered dark beer to be authentically Bavarian. 
In 1833, Gabriel Sedlmayr (the younger) of the Spaten Brewery and Anton Dreher of the Dreher Brewery in Vienna toured England to study their most recent advances in brewing—including Daniel Wheeler’s 1818 patented metal drum for drying grain that allowed for the slow controlled drying process Helles needs to achieve its very pale malt. Another event that led to the development of Helles was Spaten’s modernization of their brewery with German engineer Carl von Linde’s 1873 invention of a refrigeration system for fermentation tanks.  Spaten could then control the fermentation and conditioning of their beers and produce top quality lagers year round. 
In 1878, Bavarian Lorenz Enzinger invented mechanical beer filtration that removed yeast cells and other suspended particles from the finished beer.  In 1872, a golden yellow brew labeled “Marzen-Bier” was released by Franziskaner-Leist-Brauerei of Munich, followed by Hacker-Brauerei’s Muncher Gold in 1893. After market testing in Hamburg, Spaten released Helles Lagerbier on June 20, 1895, in Munich. Northern Germans adopted the Helles style with more battering hops to produce the German Pilsner.  There is also a stronger version called Bavarian Export, which is around 5.5% ABV. 
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Brewery:
Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier

Dominikanerstrasse 6
Bamberg, 96049

http://www.schlenkerla.de/indexe.html

The historic smoked beer brewery Schlenkerla is located in the middle of the old part of Bamberg.  Bamberg's specialty, the original Schlenkerla Smokebeer, is still being tapped directly from the wooden barrel according to old tradition.

Its smoky flavor is achieved by exposing the ...

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The historic smoked beer brewery Schlenkerla is located in the middle of the old part of Bamberg.  Bamberg's specialty, the original Schlenkerla Smokebeer, is still being tapped directly from the wooden barrel according to old tradition.

Its smoky flavor is achieved by exposing the malt to the intense, aromatic smoke of burning beechwood logs at the Schlenkerla maltings. After mixing it with premium-class hops in the brew, it matures in 700-year-old cellars into a mellow beer. 

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Avery Brewing Company Insula Multos Collibus Wild Ale Advanced Sour-ology None 9.70
Avery Brewing Company Insula Multos Collibus Wild Ale Advanced Sour-ology None 9.70

Glassware

Bottle Size

12oz

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Avery Brewing Company Insula Multos Collibus

Sour with Flavors of Cherries and Notes of Bourbon, Oak, and Vanilla 

Sour with Flavors of Cherries and Notes of Bourbon, Oak, and Vanilla 

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Style:
Wild Ale

Brewery:
Avery Brewing Company

4910 Nautilus Ct
Boulder, CO 80301

http://averybrewing.com/

In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the ...

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In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the Avery Brewing Company in Boulder, Colorado and still acts as president and head brewer. 

Like many of its older craft brew brethren, Avery started out very small. When it opened, the brewery utilized only a seven-barrel tank to ferment, leading to a very low volume of production. In the years since, the brewery has expanded significantly to encompass the entire block of warehouses where it’s located. Even after 21 years, Avery is still a relatively small operation with a limited national footprint.  We’re lucky Avery has been in the Texas market for many years.

These days, Avery is best known for big, extreme beers, but that hasn’t always been the case. The original line-up consisted of an Amber Ale, a Brown and a Dry Stout. It wasn’t until 1995 that Avery released Avery IPA. In 1999, Avery released Hog Heaven, a beer that they still call American Barley Wine to this day, but in reality, Hog Heaven was one of the first Double IPAs in the world.

It was around this time (late 1999 -2003) that Avery’s beer lineup became the heavy hitting powerhouse that it is today.  Reverend the Belgian Quad launched in 2000, Salvation the Belgium Golden in 2002, and in 2003, Czar the Russian Imperial Stout ascended to the throne and is one of Hay Merchant’s favorite Avery beers. Avery’s first experiments with barrel aging began in 2004, along with the release of the Maharaja, a 120 IBU 10.5% monster of an Imperial IPA.

In recent years, Avery has become known for its sour barrel-aged beers. The first beer in the series, Barbant, was released and was limited to 694 cases. It was an ale pitched with Brett and aged for 9 months in Zinfandel barrels. Anvil Bar and Refuge (Hay Merchant’s sister cocktail bar) was one of the only bars in Texas to get a case of this very rare beer.  Over the last few years, Avery has released a few of these beers a year, and each one is different.

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Odell Brewing Company Jolly Russian Barrel Aged Imperial Stout Dark and Flavorful 45 13.30
Odell Brewing Company Jolly Russian Barrel Aged Imperial Stout Dark and Flavorful 45 13.30

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

40 - 50 / Black

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Odell Brewing Company Jolly Russian

Bridging the Baltic and Caribbean Seas, Jolly Russian is a rich Russian Imperial Stout stowed away in Rum Barrels for aging. Dark as night and thick as the raging sea, this brew boasts notes of coffee and cocoa with waves of oak, spiced molasses, dried ...

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Bridging the Baltic and Caribbean Seas, Jolly Russian is a rich Russian Imperial Stout stowed away in Rum Barrels for aging. Dark as night and thick as the raging sea, this brew boasts notes of coffee and cocoa with waves of oak, spiced molasses, dried fruit and vanilla from the planks. It’s dangerously delicious!

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Style:
Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

Brewery:
Odell Brewing Company

800 East Lincoln Avenue
Fort Collins, CO 80524

http://odellbrewing.com/

Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create ...

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Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create quality, hand-crafted, innovative brews.

In 2009, having outgrown every inch and aspect of their previous brewery, Odell doubled its plant size to 45,000 square feet and its beer sold to 45,000 barrels—one barrel per square foot! 

As a regional craft brewery, Odell Brewing is committed to serving the communities in which it distributes by sourcing local raw materials, and through its charitable giving program known as Odell Outreach. Odell Brewing is an award winning brewery, nationally and internationally. 

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Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf Kölsch Kolsch Sociable and Refreshing None 4.80
Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf Kölsch Kolsch Sociable and Refreshing None 4.80

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf Kölsch

"These days Reissdorf Kolsch has almost reached a "cult status" with beer connoisseurs around the world looking at it as a "well preserved secret". Top fermentation lasts for about eight days with another four weeks of cold conditioning following. "Reissdorf Kolsch" is designed to be ...

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"These days Reissdorf Kolsch has almost reached a "cult status" with beer connoisseurs around the world looking at it as a "well preserved secret". Top fermentation lasts for about eight days with another four weeks of cold conditioning following. "Reissdorf Kolsch" is designed to be pale of color, soft on the palate, restrained on fruitiness, with a delicate dryness in the finish. "Reissdorf Kolsch" is a "session style" beer served in its typical 7 oz. glass in the wee-hours after work.

Another tradition unique to this beer style is its method of serving. Small wooden casks brought up to the pub via dumb waiter and placed on the bar counter are gravity -dispensed into narrow, cylindrical glasses (20 cl) called " Stangen" to expedite the pouring of the beer as well as to reduce the waiting time for impatient guests." Commercial Description

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Style:
Kolsch

Kolsch
Kolsch is a young style in the beer world, recognized only for the last 100 years or so. It’s a crisp, clean, delicately balanced beer with very subtle fruit flavors and aromas.

Appearance 
The appearance of Kolsch is very pale or light gold ...

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Kolsch
Kolsch is a young style in the beer world, recognized only for the last 100 years or so. It’s a crisp, clean, delicately balanced beer with very subtle fruit flavors and aromas.

Appearance 
The appearance of Kolsch is very pale or light gold. Authentic versions are filtered to a brilliant clarity.

Aroma/Flavor
Kolsch has a pleasant, subtle fruit aroma from fermentation.  Sometimes there is a light sulfur character from the yeast. The lower fermention temperature forces the yeast to strugle and thus produce slightly sulfur off flavors. 

The style has a delicate flavor and a low to medium bitterness with a dryness and slight pucker in the finish, but no harsh dryness.  It is smooth and crisp in the mouth with a light to medium body.  It’s generally well attenuated, but not dry. It’s more malty than a Helles and less bitter than a Pilsner. 

Ingredients 
Kolsch is made with German noble hops and German Pils or pale malt. Traditionally, this style uses a step mash program—fermented at cool temperatures and lagered for at least a month. Kolsch yeast is top fermenting. It’s a hybrid because it uses an ale yeast but is lagered for as long as 10 weeks. 

Glassware and Serving Temperature 
Kolsch is classically served in a small 200mL straight-sided glass, but at Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

Stats
Beers of this style are most often 4.4%-5.2% ABV and 20-30 IBU. 

Example
Great examples of this style are Sunner Kolsch and Saint Arnold’s Lawnmower. 

History 

Kolsch, recognized as a style only for the last 100 years, is the only beer with its own protected appellation and is restricted to the 20 or so producing breweries in and around Cologne.  Only 11 of these breweries make a Kolsch, and about 2.6 million barrels are produced a year in Cologne. Kolsch is also the name for the German spoken dialect in Cologne, which is most likely the origin of its name. 

Kolsch is a unique example of cooperation in brewing. The city of Cologne decided that instead of allowing the cities breweries compete against each other by brewing different styles they would all brew the same thing and compete against other cities and other regions.

Many American craft breweries make a Kolsch style because it’s a good gateway away from bland macro beers.
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Brewery:
Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf

Emil-Hoffmann-Straße 4-10
Köln, 50996

https://www.reissdorf.de/

Founded on October 4, 1894 by Heinrich Reissdorf and his wife Gertrud in the city of Cologne (Köln), the Reissdorf brewery has established itself as the pre-eminent brewery of the classic Kölsch.

During the period of "promoterism" at the end of the 19th ...

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Founded on October 4, 1894 by Heinrich Reissdorf and his wife Gertrud in the city of Cologne (Köln), the Reissdorf brewery has established itself as the pre-eminent brewery of the classic Kölsch.

During the period of "promoterism" at the end of the 19th century, the breweries in Cologne sprang up like mushrooms. In this era, the Privat-brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf was founded. Its founder, Heinrich Reissdorf, derived from an old-established farmer family who were based in Zieverich as farriers and coach builders. A few years later, in 1905, the name Kölsch was established for the top-fermented Cologne beer-speciality. After Heinrich's death in 1901, Gertrud Reissdorf managed the brewery until 1908. The continuance of the company had never been in danger, though, since the Reissdorf couple had five sons: Johann Hubert, Heinrich, Hermann, Friedrich and Carl Reissdorf.

When the product range was diversified to further other styles of beer, the top-fermenting brewery was renamed to Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf in 1923. Friedrich's two sons Hermann-Josef and Karl-Heinz led the company through economically difficult times after World War II, when 90 percent of the brewery was destroyed. Today, the business is continued in the fourth generation.

Due to a prosperous development of the Privat-Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf, a new site for the brewery had to be found within the boundaries of the city of Cologne; therefore, the company purchased premises in an industrial park in Cologne-Rodenkirchen. With the new production facility, a brewery with most modern brewing technology was built, which meets the highest quality criteria.

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Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Kwaremont Belgian Style Pale Ale Belgian Inspiration None 6.60
Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Kwaremont Belgian Style Pale Ale Belgian Inspiration None 6.60

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

3 - 3 / Straw

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Kwaremont

"Kwaremont blond is just like the killer climb of the Oude Kwaremont in the Flemish Ardennes: fiery and packed with character. This full malt beer delivers that jolt of liquid sugar you crave after pedalling your heart out." Commercial Description

"Kwaremont blond is just like the killer climb of the Oude Kwaremont in the Flemish Ardennes: fiery and packed with character. This full malt beer delivers that jolt of liquid sugar you crave after pedalling your heart out." Commercial Description

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Style:
Belgian Style Pale Ale

Brewery:
Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik)

Rijksweg(B) 33
Bavikhove, 8531

http://www.brouwerijdebrabandere.be/home-en

The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other ...

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The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other family members took control of the brewery, changed the name back to Brabandere Brewery and began to open a large number of cafés and pubs. Bradandere expanded its own market base by making the brewery the sole supplier of product to those cafés.

In 1990, the family split the operations of the cafés and the brewery. The brewery was renamed again, this time taking inspiration from the town that had been home to the brewery for almost 100 years—Bavik. Over the next decade, the brewery made some large investments into the brewery itself, modernizing the brewery and expanding capacity, making it one of the largest family-owned breweries in Belgium.

In 2013, the fifth generation of the Brabandere family took over. The decision was made to once again use the family name, and thus the Brabandere Brewery was revived.

In Belgium, beers are traditionally known by their stand alone brand names and not by the brewery name. Brabandere brews  three main brands: Bavik, Wittekerke and Petrus. Bavik is best known for the Pilsner, a light, refreshing, slightly hopped bohemian rendition of the style. Wittekerke is the brand used to sell wheat beers. Petrus is the moniker that adorns the “special” beers—usually higher in alcohol or anything different from the core brand of that particular brewery, not always referring to the same style of beer. The most notable beer from the Petrus line is the Aged Pale: 100 percent pale malts, dry hopped and aged for at least 18 months in large wooden fermenters. This beer is light in body but aggressively sour in taste—a Hay Merchant favorite.

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BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) L'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien Wild Ale Sour and Funky None 11.00
BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) L'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien Wild Ale Sour and Funky None 11.00

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

24 - 29 / Ruby Brown

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) L'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien

"Boldly treading the boundary between port, wine and beer, l'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien is a unique ale aged in wooden casks which have been used for several years before to age Merlot, Merlot Cabernet, Whisky and then Grappa. It manages to merge into L ...

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"Boldly treading the boundary between port, wine and beer, l'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien is a unique ale aged in wooden casks which have been used for several years before to age Merlot, Merlot Cabernet, Whisky and then Grappa. It manages to merge into L'Abbaye all the complex aromas of a vintage red wine along with the delicate harmony and flavors of the wood and its former contents. This process requires close monitoring of the beer's evolution. The final version is blended from different casks, to ensure optimal balance, complexity and enjoyment! Thus named in fond memory of Bon-Chien, the late brewery cat, deceased in June 2005, whose antics were very popular with brewery visitors" Commercial Description

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Style:
Wild Ale

Brewery:
BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes)

Ch. des Buissons 8
Saignelégier, CH-2350

http://www.brasseriebfm.ch/en/

Jérôme Rebetez concocted the first batches of beer in his parents’ kitchen. Enthusiastic about his results, he decided to present some of his creations at the “Swiss Homebrewing Trophy” contest. Apparently, he wasn’t the only one who enjoyed his brews; the judges ...

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Jérôme Rebetez concocted the first batches of beer in his parents’ kitchen. Enthusiastic about his results, he decided to present some of his creations at the “Swiss Homebrewing Trophy” contest. Apparently, he wasn’t the only one who enjoyed his brews; the judges at the contest awarded Jérôme the first place.

At 23, with a bachelor in enology, Jérôme Rebetez aspired to open up a brewery in his home region of Franches Montagnes. Full of passion but without any cash, Jérôme Rebetez decided to create beers with atypical character. He won the televised competition "Le rêve de vos 20 ans," which allowed him to establish La Brasserie des Franches-Montagnes in Saignelégier, Jura, with the obtained cash. With its spirited image, BFM was positioned as a pioneer in Swiss artisan brewing, crafting finesse beers that are complex with a great corps.

Jérôme Rebetez uses ingredients chosen to guarantee the highest quality. They are always original and sometimes tricky to mix like Sarawak pepper, sage or other spices. He built a reputation for crafting rich beers with complex bouquets, remarkable tastes and long finishes. 

L’Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien, a BFM specialty that matures in oak barrels for 12 months, was mentioned in The New York Times as the one of the best barley wines in the world.

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Brooklyn Brewery Lager Vienna Lager (Amber Lager) Malty, Toasty, and Nutty 33 5.20
Brooklyn Brewery Lager Vienna Lager (Amber Lager) Malty, Toasty, and Nutty 33 5.20

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

9 - 11 / Pale Amber

Original Gravity

13.000 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Cascade +

Flavor: Intense citrus, grapefruit and piney notes.

Aroma: Spicy flowers and some grass.

Alpha Acids: 4.5 - 7%                      

Beta Acids: 4.5 - 7%                         

Dual Purpose 

Hallertau Mittelfruh-German +

Flavor: Slightly spicy but clean bitterness

Aroma: Mild and spicy with floral tones

Alpha Acids: 3 - 5.5%                                  

Beta Acids: 3 - 5%                

Aroma 

Vanguard +

Flavor: Fine bittering with floral and slightly piney notes.

Aroma: Very subtle spice and floral tones. Earthy and herbal as well.

Alpha Acids: 5 - 6%                         

Beta Acids: 5 - 7%                

Aroma

Malt Variety

2-Row Malt +

Brooklyn Brewery Lager

"In the late 1800’s Brooklyn was one of the largest brewing centers in the country, home to more than 45 breweries. Lager beer in the “Vienna” style was one of the local favorites. Brooklyn Lager is amber-gold in color and displays a firm malt ...

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"In the late 1800’s Brooklyn was one of the largest brewing centers in the country, home to more than 45 breweries. Lager beer in the “Vienna” style was one of the local favorites. Brooklyn Lager is amber-gold in color and displays a firm malt center supported by a refreshing bitterness and floral hop aroma. Caramel malts show in the finish. The aromatic qualities of the beer are enhanced by “dry-hopping”, the centuries-old practice of steeping the beer with fresh hops as it undergoes a long, cold maturation. The result is a wonderfully flavorful beer, smooth, refreshing and very versatile with food. Dry-hopping is largely a British technique, which we’ve used in a Viennese-style beer to create an American original." Commercial Description

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Style:
Vienna Lager (Amber Lager)

Vienna Lager is a classic German lager. It was very common in the years after its first release in 1840, but it has become somewhat rare.

Appearance 
The lager should be light reddish amber to copper color with bright clarity and a large off-white, persistent ...

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Vienna Lager is a classic German lager. It was very common in the years after its first release in 1840, but it has become somewhat rare.

Appearance 
The lager should be light reddish amber to copper color with bright clarity and a large off-white, persistent head.

Aroma/Flavor
The beer should have a moderately rich German malt aroma (of Vienna and/or Munich malt). It has clean lager character, with no fruity esters or diacetyl. Noble hop aroma may be low to none.

On the palate, soft, elegant malt complexity is in the forefront, with a firm enough hop bitterness to provide a balanced finish. There is toasted character from the use of Vienna malt, but no roasted or caramel flavor. The finish is fairly dry, with both malt and hop bitterness present in the aftertaste.

Ingredients 
As with Oktoberfests, only the finest quality malt should be used, along with Continental hops (preferably Noble varieties). It’s made with moderately hard, carbonate-rich water. Some caramel malts and/or darker malts may be used to add color and sweetness, but caramel malts shouldn’t add significant aroma and flavor and dark malts shouldn’t provide any roasted character. 

Glassware and Serving Temperature 
At Hay Merchant, this style of beer is served in an 16oz American Pint. We store and serve the beer from our lager cooler at 35° F.

Stats
Vienna ranges in the high 20s (IBU). Vienna Lagers are also lightly darker then the similar Märzen (11-14 SRM compared to 9-13 SRM, but noticeable lighter then than dark lagers of the time (40 SRM). 

History 
Vienna lagers and Märzen are very closely related. Both beers were brought to the market in 1841, one year before Pilsner made it appearance. The two brewers that invented the styles (Vienna lagers and Märzen) were close friends and helped each other develop the two different styles. Vienna Lager was developed by Anton Dreher. who owned the Schwechat Brewery near Vienna. Märzen was developed by Gabriel Sedlmayr.

Prior to the development of Vienna lagers, Märzen and Pilsner in the early 1840s all German lagers were a shade of dark brown, due to the malts brewers were using. Prior to 1840, all German malts were dried using a direct fire method. This technique used open flame to heat the stone floor of the malt kiln. The resulting malts were unevenly roasted. Some kernels were very dark, while others were light. Some kernels were very dry, and others still had fairly high moisture content.

In the early 1800s, the British developed a way to dry malts using an indirect method. By using heated air instead of direct flame, the malt could be completely dried without burning or even darkening. The result was pale malt. The British used pale malt to start brewing beers like Pale Ale.

In 1833, Dreher and Sedlmayr went on a fact-finding mission to the United Kingdom. Some people would call the trip an exercise in industrial espionage; others would call it smart business. Call it what you may, but upon their return to their respective breweries, they quickly adopted the British method of malt drying.

Using these new methods, Dreher released a completely new beer: Vienna Lager, which had medium body and full malty flavor (typical Central Eurpean).  Vienna finishes much dryer then Märzen with a higher level of bitterness up front. 

The unique blend of British influence and German flavor led to the invention of a new beer style and a new type of malt. While Vienna Lager is rare today, Vienna malt is still widely used.

Strangely enough, Vienna Lagers are most commonly found in Mexico. This might have to do with the very brief period from 1864-1867 that Archduke Ferdinand Maximillian Joseph ruled Mexico as Maximilian I, Emperor of Mexico. Unfortunately, high quality examples of this style no longer exist even in Mexico due to the industrial scaled production methods employed. 

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Brewery:
Brooklyn Brewery

79 N 11th St.
Brooklyn, NY 11249

http://brooklynbrewery.com/

In 1984, Steve Hindy ended a five and a half-year tour as the Middle East Correspondent for the Associated Press where he covered wars and assassinations in Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, Egypt and Sudan. On his last night in Beirut, his hotel was hit by ...

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In 1984, Steve Hindy ended a five and a half-year tour as the Middle East Correspondent for the Associated Press where he covered wars and assassinations in Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, Egypt and Sudan. On his last night in Beirut, his hotel was hit by a mortar barrage. Steve picked up a still-warm piece of shrapnel as a memento, packed up his family and returned to New York City. During his years in the Middle East, Steve befriended diplomats based in Saudi Arabia, where Islamic law prohibits alcoholic beverages. The envoys were avid homebrewers and happily plied Steve with their flavorful beers. Returning to live in Brooklyn and editing foreign news for Newsday, Steve started brewing at home. Eventually, he enlisted his downstairs neighbor, banker Tom Potter, and they set out to establish the Brooklyn Brewery. Steve placed that shrapnel on his desk as a reminder of his days in the Middle East, where it still sits today.

Steve and Tom commissioned fourth-generation brewmaster William M. Moeller, a former head brewer at Philadelphia’s Schmidt Brewery, to brew Brooklyn Lager at the FX Matt Brewery in Utica, New York. Moeller pored over the brewing logs of a grandfather of his who had brewed in Brooklyn at the turn of the last century to develop a recipe for Brooklyn Lager. The result was an all-malt lager beer with a tangy aroma created by “dry-hopping,” an age-old technique of adding hops during the maturation process to create a robust aroma. Brooklyn Lager made quite a splash in the 1980s beer scene in New York City, dominated by the light, rice and corn lagers sold by Budweiser, Miller and Coors.

In 1988, Steve and Tom delivered their first cases of beer, and flickerings of brewed glory began to appear in Brooklyn once again. Word started to spread that the two men could be found at bars and restaurants pouring this (relatively) shocking concoction that was darker than Heineken and smelled strongly of hops, of all things.

In 1994, Garrett Oliver was brought on board as brewmaster to helm the brewing program and work on establishing the brand new Williamsburg brewhouse. Garrett began homebrewing in the 1980s after living in England for a time, where he discovered cask-fermented real ale in between gigs managing rock bands. Garrett’s talents and personal flair led to his tenure as President of the New York City Homebrewer’s Guild, where he met Steve Hindy. Whether or not Garrett was wearing a cape (a matter of mild contention between the two men to this day), this meeting included Garrett describing the recipe that would become Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout. Not long after, Garrett left his post as brewmaster of Manhattan Brewing to cross the East River and join Brooklyn Brewery. On May 28, 1996, Mayor Rudy Giuliani cut the ribbon at the grand opening of the new Brooklyn Brewery brewhouse, Tasting Room and offices in Brooklyn.

Garrett went on to develop recipes from Black Chocolate Stout to East IPA, seasonal favorites to limited run Brewmaster’s Reserve releases. His beers and his books - including The Good Beer Book, The Brewmaster’s Table and The Oxford Companion to Beer - have won many international awards, including the 2014 James Beard Award for Outstanding Wine, Beer or Spirits Professional. To this day Garrett serves as brewmaster as well as juggling a demanding international travel schedule to teach and learn new brewing techniques.

2003 was a year of big changes for Brooklyn Brewery. Years of growth made the brewery large enough to be taken seriously by big distributors, so the distribution arm of Brooklyn Brewery was sold off. Tom, who had been heavily involved in the distribution division for the previous fifteen years, decided the time was right for him to retire and sold his shares to the Ottaway family. (Not long after, Tom grew bored with retirement and filled his time by founding the New York Distilling Company not far from the Brooklyn Brewery.) The Ottaways were longtime friends and early investors, spreading from David Ottaway’s days in the Middle East as a Washington Post reporter alongside Steve Hindy.

David Ottaway’s two sons, Eric and Robin, had run the Brooklyn Brewery’s Massachusetts distribution company before it was sold in 2002. In 2014, Steve announced that the Ottaway brothers were assuming official leadership roles in the brewery, with Eric serving as CEO and Robin as President. All three continue to be highly involved in daily life at the brewery, which continues to be independently owned to this day.

Today, the Brooklyn Brewery is continuing to thrive, spreading good beer around the world. Bars and restaurants from Texas to Sweden to Australia proudly pour Brooklyn beer and display its iconic logo in great cities and far-flung reaches. Here in Brooklyn, Garrett and his team push the boundaries of brewing with an expanded barrel aging program housed in the historic Brooklyn Navy Yard down the road from the brewery and an extensive roster of experimental batches tucked away for study (and tasting.) 

The brewery is also currently planning an expansion site to boost production and send even more beer to old and new markets worldwide. 

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Brouwerij Boon Lambic Lambic Sour and Funky None 7.00
Brouwerij Boon Lambic Lambic Sour and Funky None 7.00

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

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Hops

Malt Variety

Brouwerij Boon Lambic

Lambiek Boon is the origin of the Boon beers of spontaneous fermentation. This Lambiek has aged on oak casks for two years and has a delicate taste.

Lambiek Boon is the origin of the Boon beers of spontaneous fermentation. This Lambiek has aged on oak casks for two years and has a delicate taste.

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Style:
Lambic

Brewery:
Brouwerij Boon

Fonteinstraat 65
Lembeek, Belgium B1502

http://www.boon.be/

(512) Brewing Company Lambicus IPA Cask Conditioned None 6.80
(512) Brewing Company Lambicus IPA Cask Conditioned None 6.80

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

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Hops

Columbus +

Flavor: Strong earthy flavors with some spice. Very bitter bite.

Aroma: Earthy aroma with some hints of citrus.

Alpha Acids: 14 - 16%         

Beta Acids: 4 - 5%                            

Dual Purpose

Glacier +

Flavor: Lots of fruitiness, pear, apricot and orange

Aroma: Pleasant earthy and herbal aromas, as well as citrus and fruity notes

Alpha Acids: 3.5 - 7.5%                   

Beta Acids: 5 - 9%                

Dual Purpose

Simcoe +

Flavor: Very unique blend of citrus and pine.

Aroma: Pine tree, citrus and passion fruit. Very unique.

Alpha Acids: 12 - 14%                     

Beta Acids: 4 - 5%                

Dual Purpose

Malt Variety

2-Row Malt +

Crystal +

Wheat +

(512) Brewing Company Lambicus

Their IPA with Brett added.

Their IPA with Brett added.

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Style:
IPA

IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category ...
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IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

Aroma/Taste
A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
Ingredients
IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
Examples
Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

History 
The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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Brewery:
(512) Brewing Company

407 Radam
Austin, TX 78745

http://www.512brewing.com/

(512) Brewing Company is a microbrewery located in the heart of Austin. Owner Kevin Brand, with an engineering degree and a background in medical devices, is a self-taught brewer.  (512), named for the Austin area code, brews for the community using as many local, domestic ...

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(512) Brewing Company is a microbrewery located in the heart of Austin. Owner Kevin Brand, with an engineering degree and a background in medical devices, is a self-taught brewer.  (512), named for the Austin area code, brews for the community using as many local, domestic and organic ingredients as possible. (512) beers are built on old world English and Belgian styles, enhanced to celebrate bold domestic ingredients.

Flagship beers include Wit, Pale, IPA and Pecan Porter.  Limited beers include (512) Black IPA, (512) Bruin, (512) Whiskey Barrel Aged Double Pecan Porter and more.

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Clown Shoes Lil Crispy American Lager Sociable and Refreshing None 4.80
Clown Shoes Lil Crispy American Lager Sociable and Refreshing None 4.80

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

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Hops

Malt Variety

Clown Shoes Lil Crispy

Style:
American Lager

Brewery:
Clown Shoes

23 Hayward Street
Ipswich, MA 01938

http://www.clownshoesbeer.com/

The Clown Shoes mission is to produce beer without pretension while being free and a little crazy. Jesse Dooley, beer manager of Berman's liquor store in Lexington, Mass. began improving the store's beer offerings a few years ago. Eventually Gregg Berman, one of ...

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The Clown Shoes mission is to produce beer without pretension while being free and a little crazy. Jesse Dooley, beer manager of Berman's liquor store in Lexington, Mass. began improving the store's beer offerings a few years ago. Eventually Gregg Berman, one of the owners, became interested in the craft beers he was bringing in. They started to talk about the idea of making their own beer, and then the realization clicked...they already had a distribution license. They could make a beer and distribute it! They initially contacted a few breweries to work with and Mercury Brewing Company, brewers of Ipswich Ales, stepped to the plate with open arms. Head Brewer Dan Lipke was the perfect match because he didn't merely listen to what Berman and Dooley were saying, he really understood what they wanted out of the brand. 


What really sums up Clown Shoes is how they look at beer. Their goal: "To bring fresh, local and innovative beers to the folks without pretension. Ultimately, if we can make beer that people enjoy we have accomplished our goal." 

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Back Pew Brewing Lucy Hefeweizen Sociable and Refreshing 11 4.80
Back Pew Brewing Lucy Hefeweizen Sociable and Refreshing 11 4.80

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Back Pew Brewing Lucy

Style:
Hefeweizen

The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably) the ...

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The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably) the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat. Weissbier is German for “white beer.” Weissbiers were much paler than the dark beers that were so popular in Bavaria in earlier times, so the word “white” is used relatively. By today’s standards, Weissbier is more golden due to the development of light beers like Pilsner and Helles.

The terms Hefe Weissbier or Hefe Weizen refer to any Weissbier that has yeast (Hefe) in it (i.e., a bottle-conditioned Weissbier). Outside Bavaria, most wheat beers are called Hefeweizen regardless of the yeast content or flavor profile. This practice is becoming less frequent as the American beer drinker becomes more savvy. We use the name Hefeweizen to describe a very specific German style of top fermenting wheat beer.

Appearance 
The appearance of Hefeweizen is pale straw to very dark gold in color. A good amount of haziness should be expected and is appropriate. A very thick, mousse-like, long lasing white head is characteristic.

Aroma/Flavor
The aroma has moderate to strong phenols and fruity esters. Noble hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma may be present. Acceptable aromatics can include a light, citrusy tartness, a light to moderate vanilla character and a low bubblegum and banana aroma.

The flavor is a low to moderately strong banana and clove flavor. The balance and intensity of the phenol and ester components can vary.  A very light to moderate vanilla character or low bubblegum notes can accentuate the banana flavor. The soft, bready or grainy flavor of wheat is complementary. Hop flavor is low to none. A tart, citrusy character from yeast and high carbonation is often present. Well rounded with dry finish.

The mouthfeel is medium-light to medium body.  The texture of wheat imparts the sensation of a fluffy, creamy fullness that may progress to a light, spritzy finish aided by high carbonation. Overall, a pale, spicy, fruity, refreshing wheat-based ale should be expected

Ingredients 
According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat.

Glassware and Serving Temperature 
At Hay Merchant we serve this style in a 20oz German Pilsner glass from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

Stats 
Beers of this style are most often 4.3% - 5.6% ABV and 8-15 IBU. 

Examples 
Beers like Live Oak Hefeweizen, and Weihenstephaner Hefe Weissbier are great examples of the style. 

History 
By the end of the middle ages in Germany, both barley and wheat were being used to make a top-fermented beer. The first true Weissbiers were made toward the end of the 15th century. In 1602, Duke Maximilian I placed a ban on public Weissbier brewing, and the Bavarian House of Dukes became the only body with the legal authority to brew Weissbiers. The profits from Prince Maximilian’s Weiss brewing helped fund the Thirty Years War.

As the popularity of Weissbier waned, the German House of Dukes begin to outsource the reasonability to brew to the private sector around the early part of the 1800s but still maintained control.

But the move to private brewing would not be enough to save Weissbier from extinction.  In 1855, Georg Schneider bought Wesses Brauhaus in Munich. In 1872, he worked a deal that ended the 250 year reign of royal brewing and allowed him to operate under his own terms. Even still, it wasn’t until the end of World War II that Weissbier regained its place as the No. 1 beer in Germany. Weissbier accounts for around 22 percent of the German market. It’s is the No. 1 selling micro-brewed style in Australia and can be found in the lineup of many American microbreweries.

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Brewery:
Back Pew Brewing

26452 Sorters McClellan Rd
Porter, TX 77365

http://www.backpewbrewing.com/

For many years, the building that occupied 26452 Sorters McClellan Road in Porter, Texas was a very different type of establishment. Though today the brewery bustles with machinery and fills with the aromas of beer, this old church building used to house a congregation and ...

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For many years, the building that occupied 26452 Sorters McClellan Road in Porter, Texas was a very different type of establishment. Though today the brewery bustles with machinery and fills with the aromas of beer, this old church building used to house a congregation and fill with the sound of prayers.

Though church folk are known for following tradition, we beer guys aren’t so easily defined. We seek inspiration from sources strange and fantastic, and we passionately brew our beers with creative characters and daring twists.

We are the ones who do things differently, because it’s the only way we know. We are the misfits, the ones who don’t do things by the book, the ones who spurn convention, the ones who occupy the back pew. 

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Avery Brewing Company Lunctis Viribus Wild Ale Advanced Sour-ology None 5.40
Avery Brewing Company Lunctis Viribus Wild Ale Advanced Sour-ology None 5.40

Glassware

Bottle Size

12oz

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

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Malt Variety

Avery Brewing Company Lunctis Viribus

50% ale aged in Tequila barrels and 50% ale aged in Cabernet Sauvignon barrels 

50% ale aged in Tequila barrels and 50% ale aged in Cabernet Sauvignon barrels 

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Style:
Wild Ale

Brewery:
Avery Brewing Company

4910 Nautilus Ct
Boulder, CO 80301

http://averybrewing.com/

In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the ...

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In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the Avery Brewing Company in Boulder, Colorado and still acts as president and head brewer. 

Like many of its older craft brew brethren, Avery started out very small. When it opened, the brewery utilized only a seven-barrel tank to ferment, leading to a very low volume of production. In the years since, the brewery has expanded significantly to encompass the entire block of warehouses where it’s located. Even after 21 years, Avery is still a relatively small operation with a limited national footprint.  We’re lucky Avery has been in the Texas market for many years.

These days, Avery is best known for big, extreme beers, but that hasn’t always been the case. The original line-up consisted of an Amber Ale, a Brown and a Dry Stout. It wasn’t until 1995 that Avery released Avery IPA. In 1999, Avery released Hog Heaven, a beer that they still call American Barley Wine to this day, but in reality, Hog Heaven was one of the first Double IPAs in the world.

It was around this time (late 1999 -2003) that Avery’s beer lineup became the heavy hitting powerhouse that it is today.  Reverend the Belgian Quad launched in 2000, Salvation the Belgium Golden in 2002, and in 2003, Czar the Russian Imperial Stout ascended to the throne and is one of Hay Merchant’s favorite Avery beers. Avery’s first experiments with barrel aging began in 2004, along with the release of the Maharaja, a 120 IBU 10.5% monster of an Imperial IPA.

In recent years, Avery has become known for its sour barrel-aged beers. The first beer in the series, Barbant, was released and was limited to 694 cases. It was an ale pitched with Brett and aged for 9 months in Zinfandel barrels. Anvil Bar and Refuge (Hay Merchant’s sister cocktail bar) was one of the only bars in Texas to get a case of this very rare beer.  Over the last few years, Avery has released a few of these beers a year, and each one is different.

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Destihl Brewery Lynnbrook Berliner Weisse Sour and Funky 4 4.20
Destihl Brewery Lynnbrook Berliner Weisse Sour and Funky 4 4.20

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

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Hops

Malt Variety

Destihl Brewery Lynnbrook

Lynnbrook, named after our founder's family farm, is a wild Berliner-style Weisse with raspberries added. The result is a refreshing, fuchsia-colored beer with an aroma of raspberry-lemon giving way to hints of brie with subtle lemon and yogurt-like flavors supported by tart, fresh raspberries ...

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Lynnbrook, named after our founder's family farm, is a wild Berliner-style Weisse with raspberries added. The result is a refreshing, fuchsia-colored beer with an aroma of raspberry-lemon giving way to hints of brie with subtle lemon and yogurt-like flavors supported by tart, fresh raspberries and underlying lactic sourness.  

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Style:
Berliner Weisse

Berliner Weisse

The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat to ...

read more

Berliner Weisse

The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat to use the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably). Weissbier is German for “white beer.” Weissbiers were much paler than the dark beers that were so popular in Bavaria in earlier times, so the word “white” is used relatively. By today’s standards, Weissbier is more golden due to the development of  light beers like Pilsner and Helles.

Berliner Weisse is the one style of Weissbeer not held to the German standard of 50% wheat. 

Appearance 
The appearance of Berliner Weisse is pale straw to very dark gold in color. A light haziness can be expected, but is not required. A very thick, mousse-like, long-lasting white head is characteristic. 

Aroma/Flavor
Lactic acid sourness is the most notable aroma.  Moderate to strong phenols and fruity esters are also present. Noble hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma may be present. Acceptable aromatics can include a light, citrusy tartness, a light to moderate vanilla character and a low bubblegum and banana aroma, as well as the keystone lactic sourness.

The style has a mild sour flavor with a light and fruity character.

Ingredients 
According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50% wheat, but Berliner Weiss is the one weissbeer not held to this restriction. A traditional decoction mash is used to give the beer body and mouthfeel.

Glassware and Serving Temperature 
At Hay Merchant we will serve this style in a 20oz German Pilsner glass or English Pint poured from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

Stats
Beers of this style are most often 2%-3.5% ABV and 8-15 IBU. 

Example
A great example of this style is Saint Arnold Boiler Room. 

History 
By the end of the middle ages in Germany, both barley and wheat were being used to make a top-fermented beer. The first true Weissbiers were made toward the end of the 15th century. In 1602, Duke Maximilian I placed a ban on public Weissbier brewing, and the Bavarian House of Dukes became the only body with the legal authority to brew Weissbiers. The profits from Prince Maximilian’s Weiss brewing helped fund the Thirty Years War.

As the popularity of Weissbier waned, the German House of Dukes begin to outsource the reasonability to brew to the private sector around the early part of the 1800s but still maintained control.

But the move to private brewing would not be enough to save Weissbier from extinction.  In 1855, Georg Schneider bought Wesses Brauhaus in Munich. In 1872, he worked a deal that ended the 250 year reign of royal brewing and allowed him to operate under his own terms. Even still, it wasn’t until the end of World War II that Weissbier regained its place as the No. 1 beer in Germany. Weissbier accounts for around 22 percent of the German market. It’s the No. 1 selling micro-brewed style in Australia and can be found in the lineup of many American microbreweries.

Berliner Weisse slowly found its definition from the 17th to the 20th century. At the heights of its popularity in the 19th century, there were more than 700 breweries making the style.  There isn’t a written history to the style’s exact origins, but two theories are possible. The first states that 18th century French immigrants came to Berlin via Flanders and picked up the techniques required to make sour beer from the producers of Flemish sour Red Ale.  The second theory points to a beer brewed in Berlin in the 1640s called Halberstadter Brogan that was based on an unknown style from Hamburg. 

We do know that the style has not always been sour.  It was a light wheat beer—about 50/50 wheat and barley.  The beer was about 3% ABV and, most importantly, not boiled. The hops were boiled in a separate vessel, and then the boiling hop water was added to the mash to increase the temperature. Hops were also added to the mash itself, making it easier for the wort to run off in a straw bed. The lack of a wort boil led to a lack of sterilization, and it’s easy to imagine that huge levels of microorganisms had to be present, thanks to the straw bed and other factors. This would not be true spontaneous fermentation as we see in Lambics because the micros would have come from the straw. 

These production methods led to three opportunities for lactic acid bacteria to infect the beer: 1) during the mash if left sitting at a low temperature, 2) during fermentation due to yeast cross contamination, and 3) in storage due to micro flora in the wooden barrels. 

As the popularity of wheat beers began to wain across Germany prior to World War I, so did the popularity of Berliner Weisse. Lighter, less flavorful beers began to gain popularity, so the breweries serving Berliner Weisse began to add flavored syrups to the beer to make it more acceptable to the average drinker. Today, there are only two commercial brewers in Berlin making the style. 

As of 2014, the style found new popularity in American craft beer, with more than 100 craft breweries releasing versions of the beer that year alone. It owes its newfound popularity to the overall rise in popularity of sour beers. Most American craft brewers use a mash rest to achieve the desired levels of lactic acid.  Once the mash process is completed, the brewer leaves the mash in the tun for several days.  Once the PH reaches the desired level, the wort is run off to the boil kettle.  Boiling the wort sanitizes the beer and ensures that the beer keeps its lactic acid flavor without exposing the rest of the brewery to contamination. 

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Brewery:
Destihl Brewery

1616 General Electric (G.E.) Road, Unit #1
Bloomington, IL 61704

http://www.destihlbrewery.com/

DESTIHL Brewery is located in the G.E. Warehouses just off of Veterans Parkway and General Electric (G.E.) Road in Bloomington, IL.  The 20,000-square-foot production brewery is situated just half a mile from their first gastrobrewpub location in Normal, IL.      

The production brewery ...

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DESTIHL Brewery is located in the G.E. Warehouses just off of Veterans Parkway and General Electric (G.E.) Road in Bloomington, IL.  The 20,000-square-foot production brewery is situated just half a mile from their first gastrobrewpub location in Normal, IL.      

The production brewery features a 25 barrel (BBL), four vessel, steam-heated Saaz Brewhouse capable of producing over 20,000 barrels a year.  Currently they are operating with a 15,000 barrel annual fermentation capacity utilizing eight 60 barrel (BBL) fermenters, five 30 BBL fermenters, two 60 BBL and two 30 BBL brite tanks and a 60,000 lbs. malt silo. Their 5,000 sq ft. beer cellar is presently storing over 300 oak barrels (a mix of former California wine barrels and also bourbon barrels), plus a 33 hectoliter (871 gallon) oak foudre and two 45 hectoliter (1,188 gallon) oak foudres (each received directly from France).  The cellar has enough vertical space for over 100,000 cu. ft. of barrel aging, with the bulk of it used for their renowned sour beer program.  On the packaging side, they have an automated canning line manufactured by Cask Brewing Systems. They have recently added an Italian bottling line for bottling our Saint Dekkera Reserve Sour Ales and other specialty releases. This rotary, 6-head rinser/filler with labeler (fills 600-1,000 bottles per hour, or 10-16 bpm).

The Destihl brewery concept was first brewed up in a five gallon batch of beer made by CEO & Brewmaster, Matt Potts, in a homebrew kit given to him by his wife, Lyn, for Christmas in 1995.  Matt's passion for craft beer started in the summer of 1991, before he entered law school, although brewing beer was in his blood as evidenced by bottles of homebrew made by his grandfather over 35 years ago which still remain in his family's farmhouse built in 1865.  After practicing law for over 11 years, Matt decided it was time for a career change, so he traded in his briefcase for a mash paddle, went to brewing school and opened the first DESTIHL Restaurant & Brew Works in 2007 with a team of people dedicated to only the best beer, food and service.
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New Belgium Brewing Company Mural Agua Fresca Fruited Ale Sociable and Refreshing None 4.00
New Belgium Brewing Company Mural Agua Fresca Fruited Ale Sociable and Refreshing None 4.00

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

New Belgium Brewing Company Mural Agua Fresca

Produced in partnership with Primus Cerveceria, a leading Mexican craft brewery based in Mexico City founded by three cousins, Rodolfo, Jaime, and Rebeca. Mural is our joint homage to the classic agua fresca that also pushes the boundaries of what a beer can be. 

In ...

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Produced in partnership with Primus Cerveceria, a leading Mexican craft brewery based in Mexico City founded by three cousins, Rodolfo, Jaime, and Rebeca. Mural is our joint homage to the classic agua fresca that also pushes the boundaries of what a beer can be. 

In Mexico, the agua fresca is everywhere.  They're usually found in street food markets and feature a blend of seasonal fruits. Our cerveza takes inspiration from agua frescas and features hibiscus, agave, watermelon, and lime for a fresh, vibrant sip.  

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Style:
Fruited Ale

Brewery:
New Belgium Brewing Company

500 Linden Street
Fort Collins, CO 80524

http://www.newbelgium.com/

New Belgium founder Jeff Lebesch was inspired to start his own brewery during a mountain biking trip to Belgium in 1989. 1989.  He returned home to Fort Collins, Colorado and began brewing beer in his basement--a brown dubbel with earthy undertones named Abbey and a ...

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New Belgium founder Jeff Lebesch was inspired to start his own brewery during a mountain biking trip to Belgium in 1989. 1989.  He returned home to Fort Collins, Colorado and began brewing beer in his basement--a brown dubbel with earthy undertones named Abbey and a well-balanced amber called Fat Tire. 

Jeff’s Belgian inspired brews garnered enough praise from friends and neighbors that Jeff and his wife Kim (now New Belgium's CEO) took their basement brewery commercial in 1991. Kim, social worker by day and mother to two always, began the marketing process by knocking on their neighbor's door. Artist Anne Fitch was that neighbor, whose watercolors came to help craft the New Belgium brand for 23 years, including the original Fat Tire label. 

Bringing on Peter Bouckaert, a Belgian Brewmaster previously working at Rodenbach, in 1996 helped influence their love of sour beers. Moving forward, Peter would take the brewing reins as Jeff began pursuing other interests. In 2009, Jeff moved on completely and New Belgium continues to flourish with Kim, Peter and a team of dedicated employee-owners at the helm. 

New Belgium is expanding to Asheville, North Carolina, and is in the midst of construction on a 133,000-square-foot brewery, scheduled to start brewing beer by the end of 2015. 

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Eureka Heights Brewing Company Neon Moon w/Azacca & Hibiscus Belgian Style Golden Cask Conditioned 33 4.30
Eureka Heights Brewing Company Neon Moon w/Azacca & Hibiscus Belgian Style Golden Cask Conditioned 33 4.30

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Pilsner +

Eureka Heights Brewing Company Neon Moon w/Azacca & Hibiscus

This hoppy Belgian-style Single
combines Pilsner malt and Azacca
hops to create a fruity and tropical
aroma. This second summer crusher
has a soft estery aroma with notes of
peaches and pears. Flavor is stonefruit
and citrus with a light breadiness.

This hoppy Belgian-style Single
combines Pilsner malt and Azacca
hops to create a fruity and tropical
aroma. This second summer crusher
has a soft estery aroma with notes of
peaches and pears. Flavor is stonefruit
and citrus with a light breadiness.

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Style:
Belgian Style Golden

Brewery:
Eureka Heights Brewing Company

941 W 18TH ST
Houston, Texas 77008

http://www.eurekaheights.com/

New brewery in the Heights

New brewery in the Heights

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Legal Draft Beer Company Old Fashion Justice Barrel Aged IPA Oddly Delicious 55 9.80
Legal Draft Beer Company Old Fashion Justice Barrel Aged IPA Oddly Delicious 55 9.80

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Citra +

Flavor: Lemon/lime and tropical fruitiness.

Aroma: Very clean citrus aroma.

Alpha Acids: 10 - 14%         

Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

Aroma

Malt Variety

Legal Draft Beer Company Old Fashion Justice

Our Presumed Innocent IPA, aged for two months on freshly dumped Witherspoon whiskey barrels. After those two months, we added Citra hops and orange peel for a smooth, sweet finish.

Our Presumed Innocent IPA, aged for two months on freshly dumped Witherspoon whiskey barrels. After those two months, we added Citra hops and orange peel for a smooth, sweet finish.

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Style:
Barrel Aged IPA

Brewery:
Legal Draft Beer Company

500 E Division st
Arlington, TX 76011

http://www.legaldraftbeer.com/

We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and ...

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We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and are meant to stand up with the best beers in our state, our nation, and the world. We hope you’ll enjoy them with your family and friends in our taproom and beer garden, or at your favorite watering hole.

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Stone Brewing Company Old Guardian 2015 American Barley Wine Not for the Faint of Heart 80 12.00
Stone Brewing Company Old Guardian 2015 American Barley Wine Not for the Faint of Heart 80 12.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

18 - 19 / Amber-Brown

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Stone Brewing Company Old Guardian 2015

"Barley wines are traditionally hefty brews, but ours is downright excessive. The huge maltiness of this beer is only tamed by an equally prodigious addition of hops, creating a rich, slightly sweet, caramel-hued ale infused with assertive bitterness and bright hop notes, all culminating in ...

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"Barley wines are traditionally hefty brews, but ours is downright excessive. The huge maltiness of this beer is only tamed by an equally prodigious addition of hops, creating a rich, slightly sweet, caramel-hued ale infused with assertive bitterness and bright hop notes, all culminating in a pleasing dryness. While it will evolve into an even more glorious brew with age, this beer's delicious onslaught of flavors will seriously challenge your ability to wait any longer to drink it." Commercial Description

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Style:
American Barley Wine

American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
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American Barley Wine
Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

About Strong Ales
Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
Appearance
The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

Aroma/Taste
The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
Ingredients
Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
Examples
Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

History 
This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
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Brewery:
Stone Brewing Company

1999 Citracado Parkway
Escondido, CA 92029

http://www.stonebrewing.com/

Stone Brewing Co. is a brewery headquartered in Escondido, California. Founded in 1996 in San Marcos, California, it is the largest brewery in Southern California.  As of 2012, it was the tenth largest craft brewery in the United States and 17th largest brewery overall, based ...

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Stone Brewing Co. is a brewery headquartered in Escondido, California. Founded in 1996 in San Marcos, California, it is the largest brewery in Southern California.  As of 2012, it was the tenth largest craft brewery in the United States and 17th largest brewery overall, based on sales volume. The brewery is owned by Steve Wagner and craft beer superstar Greg Koch.

The brewery's first beer was Stone Pale Ale, which the company considers to be its flagship ale. However, the brewery is best known for their other core beer, Stone IPA, which is considered the benchmark of the American IPA style.

The Arrogant Bastard line of ales best exhibits the brewery’s overall attitude, consisting of Stone Arrogant Bastard, Stone Double Bastard and Stone Lucky Bastard. A little known fact: owner Greg Koch considers Arrogant Bastard as a brand in its own right and gets very upset when the name Stone is used to describe Arrogant Bastard.

Most of Stone’s beers are characteristic of West Coast craft brews, meaning that they have a high hop content. Compared to the macro-produced lagers, many Stone brews feature alcohol percentages that are well above average. The alcohol-by-volume content of Stone brews ranges from 4.2% to 13%.

Stone Brewing is rated as a "world class brewery" by the two largest beer enthusiast websites, RateBeer and BeerAdvocate. Stone Brewing has been voted by the readers of Beer Advocate as the #1 "All Time Top Brewery on Planet Earth."

Stone opened in San Marcos in 1996 at the location currently home to Port Brewing Company and The Lost Abbey. In 2006, Stone relocated from the original brewery to a new, custom-designed facility in Escondido. In 2013, the company opened a packaging hall just south of the brewery, which houses the bottling and keg lines. The brewery in Escondido produced 213,277 US beer barrels in 2013. The site is also home to a restaurant, Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens - Escondido, an 8,500-square-foot restaurant with a large outdoor patio and an acre of gardens. Stone also operates a 19-acre organic farm known as Stone Farms, just north of the brewery in Escondido, and several other restaurants in California.

In June 2008, Stone Brewing covered the roof of the brewery with solar panels, cutting their energy costs nearly in half. The 1,561 roof-mounted solar modules will offset more than 538,000 pounds of carbon emissions over its lifetime, which is equivalent to planting 204 acres of trees.

In July 2014, Stone Brewing Co. announced plans to open a brewery and restaurant in Berlin, Germany.

In October 2014, Stone Brewing Co. announced the location of its first brewery and destination restaurant in the Eastern United States—Richmond, VA.  The facility is expected to be operation by late 2015 or early 2016. 

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North Coast Brewing Company Old Stock 2013 Old Ale/Stock Ale Not for the Faint of Heart 34 11.90
North Coast Brewing Company Old Stock 2013 Old Ale/Stock Ale Not for the Faint of Heart 34 11.90

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

15 - 17 / Deep Amber

Original Gravity

1.100 gravity

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

East Kent Golding-UK +

Flavor: Delicate floral, earthy and honey-like flavors.

Aroma: Earthy lemon and thyme overtones.

Alpha Acids: 4 - 6%                         

Beta Acids: 1.9 - 3%             

Dual Purpose

Fuggle +

Flavor: Woody and vegetale.

Aroma: Herby and spicy with mild woody and fruity characteristics

Alpha Acids: 3.5 - 5.8%                   

Beta Acids: 2 - 3%                

Dual Purpose

Malt Variety

North Coast Brewing Company Old Stock 2013

"Like a fine port, Old Stock Ale is intended to be laid down. With an original gravity of over 1.100 and a generous hopping rate, Old Stock Ale is well-designed to round out and mellow with age. It's brewed with classic Maris Otter ...

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"Like a fine port, Old Stock Ale is intended to be laid down. With an original gravity of over 1.100 and a generous hopping rate, Old Stock Ale is well-designed to round out and mellow with age. It's brewed with classic Maris Otter malt and Fuggles and East Kent Goldings hops, all imported from England." Commercial Description

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Style:
Old Ale/Stock Ale

Old Ale/Stock Ale
Old Ales and Stock Ales are high gravity beers intended for long aging.  The biggest difference between this style and other Strong Ales is the very low attenuation of the wort, resulting in a very sweet flavor. The long aging helps ...
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Old Ale/Stock Ale
Old Ales and Stock Ales are high gravity beers intended for long aging.  The biggest difference between this style and other Strong Ales is the very low attenuation of the wort, resulting in a very sweet flavor. The long aging helps balance the sweetness out by adding wood flavors, lactic sour notes and allowing the heavier sugars to drop out of the beer.

About Strong Ales
Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
Appearance
The appearance is light amber to very dark reddish-brown. There is a creamy tan-colored head.

Aroma/Taste
The aroma is malty sweet with fruity esters, often with a complex blend of dried fruit, vinous, caramel, molasses, nuts, toffee, treacle and/or other specialty malt.
There is medium to high malt character with a luscious malt complexity, often with nutty, caramel and/or molasses-like flavors. Balance is often malty sweet but may be well hopped (the impression of bitterness often depends on the amount of aging). Moderate to high fruity esters are common and may take on a dried fruit or vinous character. The finish may contribute oxidative flavors similar to a fine old sherry, Port or Madeira. Alcoholic strength is evident. Some wood-aged or blended versions may have a lactic acid or Brettanomyces flavor from long exposure to raw barrels. This is a standard trait in many old world styles because, historically, sanitary practices were not as precise as they are today.
Ingredients
Old Ales/Stock Ales contain pale malts and caramel malts. Dark malts can be used, but if the color becomes too dark, it will fall outside the standard style guidelines. Hops are used, but variety is not important because of long term aging. Adjuncts like molasses are sometimes used. 

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 6%-9% and an average IBU range of 30-60.
Examples
Great examples of this style are Great Divide Hibernation Ale, Avery Old Jubilation and North Coast Old Stock.

History 
The beer is called Old or Stock Ale because, historically, strong beer was used as a blending beer with other weaker “running beers” (beers brewed for immediate sale). Thus, the bar or brewery had a “stock” of strong beer in reserve. The term “old” was used because, in most cases, the Stock Ale were aged for months or years, thus making it old by beer standards.
The parti-gyle system plays an important roll in the historical origins on the style. Parti-gyle is the process in which multiple beers are made from the same batch of grist using a single high-temperature (~150° F) step mashing process. Because the grist was single infusion mashed at such a high temperature, the wort was only about 50% fermentable. The resulting beer would only be about 6% - 9% ABV. The first runnings off the mash would yield a wort around 1.100 OG. These first runnings would become Stock Ales. Because of advances in brewing practices, few brewers still practice parti-gyle.
Some people say that Stock Ales and Old Ales are slightly different, but they’re not. If there were a difference, it would be that hypothetically you could have a young Stock Ale, but in historical practice this never happened. If you must draw a differance it would be that Stock Ales are freash and Old Ales are Stock Ale that has been aged.
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Brewery:
North Coast Brewing Company

455 North Main Street
Fort Bragg, CA 95437

http://www.northcoastbrewing.com/home.php

A pioneer in the Craft Beer movement, North Coast Brewing Company opened in 1988 as a local brewpub in the historic town of Fort Bragg, located on California’s Mendocino Coast. 

Under the leadership of Brewmaster Mark Ruedrich, the brewery has developed a strong reputation ...

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A pioneer in the Craft Beer movement, North Coast Brewing Company opened in 1988 as a local brewpub in the historic town of Fort Bragg, located on California’s Mendocino Coast. 

Under the leadership of Brewmaster Mark Ruedrich, the brewery has developed a strong reputation for quality having won more than 70 awards in national and international competitions.

In addition to Red Seal Ale, Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout, Scrimshaw Pilsner, and other fine North Coast brands, the brewery has resurrected the old Acme label with a heritage dating back to the San Francisco of the 1860s.

These exceptional beers are available in 47 states now and also are exported to Europe and the Pacific Rim.

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11 Below Brewing Company Oso Bueno Amber Ale Cask Conditioned 22 5.30
11 Below Brewing Company Oso Bueno Amber Ale Cask Conditioned 22 5.30

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

12.000 plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Centennial +

Flavor: Slightly more bitter than Cascade with some strong grapefruit notes and spicy tones.

Aroma: Grapefruit and herbal notes.

Alpha Acids: 9.5 - 11.5%     

Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

Dual Purpose

Warrior +

Flavor: Smooth mild citrus flavor with some earthiness and pine.

Aroma: Mild and resinous with slight citrus.

Alpha Acids: 15 - 17%                     

Beta Acids: 4.5 - 5.5%          

Bittering

Willamette +

Flavor: Mild fruitiness.

Aroma: Floral, spicy and herbal.

Alpha Acids: 4 - 6%                         

Beta Acids: 3 - 4.5%             

Aroma

Malt Variety

2-Row Malt +

Crystal +

Malted Rye +

11 Below Brewing Company Oso Bueno

"Our American Amber is brewed for the summers and cuisine of Texas. Subtle sweet notes of caramel and toffee, along with a balanced hop flavor create a beer that's so refreshing and delicious it can only be called... Oso Bueno" Commercial Description

"Our American Amber is brewed for the summers and cuisine of Texas. Subtle sweet notes of caramel and toffee, along with a balanced hop flavor create a beer that's so refreshing and delicious it can only be called... Oso Bueno" Commercial Description

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Style:
Amber Ale

Brewery:
11 Below Brewing Company

6820 Bourgeois Rd
Houston, TX 77066

http://11belowbrewing.com/

11 Below Brewing Co., a new brewery located in North Houston, was founded by three former oil industry professionals, Jeff Handojo, Bryce Baker and Brandon Moss. 

The 10,000-square-foot, 30-barrel brewhouse officially opened in May 2015, with Keenan Zarling as head brewmaster. They launched with ...

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11 Below Brewing Co., a new brewery located in North Houston, was founded by three former oil industry professionals, Jeff Handojo, Bryce Baker and Brandon Moss. 

The 10,000-square-foot, 30-barrel brewhouse officially opened in May 2015, with Keenan Zarling as head brewmaster. They launched with three beers: 7-Iron, a hoppy session; Oso Bueno, an American Amber; and Color Blind, a Red IPA. 

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Hanssens Artisanaal Oud Kriek Lambic Fresh and Fruity None 6.00
Hanssens Artisanaal Oud Kriek Lambic Fresh and Fruity None 6.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

375mL

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Hanssens Artisanaal Oud Kriek

Big Bright Lemony Tartness with Sour Cherry Flavor

Big Bright Lemony Tartness with Sour Cherry Flavor

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Style:
Lambic

Brewery:
Hanssens Artisanaal

Vroenenbosstraat 15
Dworp, Belgium 1653

Hanssens Artisanaal is the oldest independent geuze blender in the whole world. At Hanssens, no beer is actually brewed! Instead, they pursue a profession that was very important in the history of lambic style beers, they are solely blenders of beer.

Lambic beers are famous ...

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Hanssens Artisanaal is the oldest independent geuze blender in the whole world. At Hanssens, no beer is actually brewed! Instead, they pursue a profession that was very important in the history of lambic style beers, they are solely blenders of beer.

Lambic beers are famous for being "wild fermented". Instead of adding a special yeast strain to cause fermentation, some brewers in the Senne river valley leave the warm, sweet, unfermented beer (called wort) open to the elements. Wild strains of yeast and other micro organisms will then seed the liquid. Normally when brewing beer, a brewers yeast will be used to turn sugar into alcohol and certain flavor elements of the beer. In these wild beers, yeast and others will turn sugar into alcohol, acid, and a huge variety of flavor chemicals. 

Since each batch is different, the beer has to be blended with multiple batches to create a consistent product. Most lambics are created from a mixture of aged sour beer and young, sweeter beer. They are then barrel aged to combine the flavors.

Hanssens takes this a step further, and actually blends batches from different breweries in their area. This used to be a very common practice, but Hanssens is now the oldest remaining blender. They bring to this endeavor a variety of barrels, some up to one hundred years old, and a passion and a love for the tradition of Geuze and Lambics. They will also add whole fruits to some of their beers, to make even more flavorful blends.

Hanssens Bartholomeus, former major of Dworp, started to brew lambic in 1871, in the previous Sint-Antonius brewery. Documents have proven that he continued to brew, from 1896 onwards, in buildings located in the Vroenenbosstraat, Dworp. These premises are still used. 

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Devil and The Deep Brewery Over Currant Belgian Style Tripel Belgian Inspiration None 9.50
Devil and The Deep Brewery Over Currant Belgian Style Tripel Belgian Inspiration None 9.50

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

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Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

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Malt Variety

Devil and The Deep Brewery Over Currant

Belgian yeast with a touch of banana. Very clean and balanced

Belgian yeast with a touch of banana. Very clean and balanced

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Style:
Belgian Style Tripel

Brewery:
Devil and The Deep Brewery

2425 Postoffice St
Galveston, TX 77550

https://untappd.com/DevilDeepBrew

New brewery to Galveston, not a lot of info.

New brewery to Galveston, not a lot of info.

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Sierra Nevada Pale Ale American Pale Ale Hop-a-licious 38 5.60
Sierra Nevada Pale Ale American Pale Ale Hop-a-licious 38 5.60

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

4 - 5 / Pale Gold

Original Gravity

13.100 plato

Final Gravity

2.800 plato

Hops

Cascade +

Flavor: Intense citrus, grapefruit and piney notes.

Aroma: Spicy flowers and some grass.

Alpha Acids: 4.5 - 7%                      

Beta Acids: 4.5 - 7%                         

Dual Purpose 

Magnum +

Flavor: Clean bittering hop flavor

Aroma: No distinct aroma characteristics

Alpha Acids: 10 - 14%                     

Beta Acids: 4.5 - 7%             

Bittering 

Perle +

Flavor: Very earthy with a minty finish.

Aroma: Earthy and slightly spicy.

Alpha Acids: 7 - 9.5%                                  

Beta Acids: 4 - 5%                

Dual Purpose

Malt Variety

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

"Pale Ale began as a home brewer’s dream, grew into an icon, and inspired countless brewers to follow a passion of their own. Its unique piney and grapefruit aromas from the use of whole-cone American hops have fascinated beer drinkers for decades and made ...

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"Pale Ale began as a home brewer’s dream, grew into an icon, and inspired countless brewers to follow a passion of their own. Its unique piney and grapefruit aromas from the use of whole-cone American hops have fascinated beer drinkers for decades and made this beer a classic, yet it remains new, complex and surprising to thousands of beer drinkers every day." Commercial Description

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Style:
American Pale Ale

American Pale Ale
American Pale Ale is an American adaptation of English Pale Ale—usually lighter in color, cleaner, with less caramel flavors but more finishing hops than their English counterparts.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and ...
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American Pale Ale
American Pale Ale is an American adaptation of English Pale Ale—usually lighter in color, cleaner, with less caramel flavors but more finishing hops than their English counterparts.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The appearance is pale golden to deep amber with a moderately large white to off-white head with good retention. It’s generally clear or slightly hazy.

Aroma/Taste
The hop aroma is usually moderate to strong with a citrus character. There is low to moderate maltiness with bready, toasty or biscuity aromas. Fruity esters range from moderate to none. Dry hopping may add grassy notes.
The style has a moderate to high hop flavor, often showing citrusy American hop character.  Low to moderately high lean malt character supports the hop presentation and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character such as bready, toasty or biscuity notes. Fruity esters are moderate to none. Moderate to high hop bitterness often lingers in the finish. American Ale yeast adds a very clean fermentation with a very light fruitiness. The mouthfeel has a medium light to medium body. Carbonation is moderate to high with an overall smooth finish without astringency.  The result is a refreshing and hoppy beer with sufficient supporting malt.
Ingredients
American Pale Ales contain Manly Pale Ale Malt, generally American 2-Row, American hops and American Ale yeast.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 4.5%-6.2% and an average IBU range of 30-45.
Examples
Great examples of this style include Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Stone Pale Ale and Left Hand Brewing Jackman’s Pale Ale.

History 
The American style evolved alongside the evolution of microbreweries. Wanting more flavor in their beer, Americans embraced hop character with abundant citrus and piney flavors. The beer is based on bitterness with a floral aroma. The style was the first widespread use of the 4 Cs in American Hops: Cascade, Centennial, Chinook and Columbus.
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Brewery:
Sierra Nevada

1075 E. 20th St.
Chico, CA 95928

http://www.sierranevada.com/

In 1979, Ken Grossman began building a small brewery in the town of Chico, California. His goal: to brew exceptional ales and lagers. Today, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is considered the premier craft brewery in the United States. And the beer? Critics proclaim it, “Among ...

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In 1979, Ken Grossman began building a small brewery in the town of Chico, California. His goal: to brew exceptional ales and lagers. Today, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is considered the premier craft brewery in the United States. And the beer? Critics proclaim it, “Among the best brewed anywhere in the world.” 

Ken’s passion for brewing began when a friend’s father showed him the basics of homebrewing. Using homemade equipment, he began brewing five-gallon batches of beer on his own and soon became a proficient home brewer. 

In 1976, after studying chemistry and physics at Butte Community College and California State University, Chico, he opened his own store, The Home Brew Shop. There, he supplied Chico’s homebrewing community with equipment, materials and advice, but dreamed of opening his own brewery. 

Two years later, it was time to make the dream a reality. Ken cobbled together a brewery from dairy tanks, a soft-drink bottler and equipment salvaged from defunct breweries. Though the equipment was secondhand, he created a first-rate microbrewery. The ingredients were premium, including the copious quantities of hops that would become the brewery’s trademark. An avid backpacker, Ken named the new company for his favorite hiking grounds—the Sierra Nevada Mountains. 

On November 15, 1980, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. brewed the first batch of what would soon become a landmark in American craft brewing: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Word spread quickly and over the next decade the demand for Sierra Nevada brews soon exceeded the brewery’s modest brewing capacity. Despite nearly constant additions to the brewery, Ken was soon back at the drawing board, planning a new brewery. In 1989, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. moved to its current site. 

Ken traveled to Germany and brought back a used, traditional, 100-barrel copper brewhouse that became the heart of the new brewery. It met demand for a while, but the brewery soon needed to expand again. In 1997, he commissioned a new, larger brewhouse, and coaxed the original coppersmiths out of retirement to match new kettles to the originals. This expansion became the powerhouse that helped bring the brewery’s total capacity to more than 800,000 barrels per year. 

Building the new brewery afforded Sierra Nevada the opportunity to create two stunning showcases, both featuring exceptional dining, live music and its award-winning beers. The Sierra Nevada Taproom and Restaurant has become a destination in its own right. The brewery is also home to the 350-seat Big Room—a beautifully designed live music venue.

Sierra Nevada brewed one million barrels in 2014. Year round beers include Pale Ale (flagship), Torpedo® Extra IPA, Hop Hunter® IPA, Nooner® Pilsner, Porter, Stout, and Kellerweis® Bavarian-Style Wheat.

The soul of Sierra Nevada is the brewery's affinity for whole-cone hops and the special flavors and aromas they provide. Sierra Nevada uses more whole-cone hops than any brewery in the world. They love the aromas from dry-hopped beers so much that they created the revolutionary “Hop Torpedo,” a sleek, stainless steel device they use to gather the most hop flavor and aroma without imparting any excess bitterness.

In every aspect of the brewery, Sierra Nevada strives to be as environmentally responsible as possible. From recycling and composting to water treatment, bio-fuel production and water conservation, the brewery works hard to minimize its impact on the environment. In 2008, Sierra Nevada completed construction of one of the largest privately owned solar arrays in the country with more than 10,000 panels that provide nearly 20% of the brewery's total energy needs. 

In 2005, Sierra Nevada was the first brewery to install hydrogen fuel cells; the combination of the solar array and the fuel cell system generates more than half of the brewery’s energy needs on site. They also have an extensive water treatment program including our own wastewater treatment facility. 

Through extensive recycling, reuse and composting programs, the brewery is able to divert 99.8% of its solid waste from landfills. 

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. was named a “Green Power Partner” in 2011 by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and "Green Business of the Year" in 2010 by the EPA for its practices in sustainability.

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Upland Brewing Company Peach Fruited Sour Sour and Funky None 6.00
Upland Brewing Company Peach Fruited Sour Sour and Funky None 6.00

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Upland Brewing Company Peach

Tart and funky with notes of fresh peach skin and peach meat.

Tart and funky with notes of fresh peach skin and peach meat.

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Style:
Fruited Sour

Brewery:
Upland Brewing Company

350 W. 11th St.o ,
Bloomington, IN 47404

https://www.uplandbeer.com/

Here at Upland, our brewers are always experimenting, putting their own spin on traditional brewing recipes with unique local ingredients. Our beers—from wood-aged sour ales to traditional ales and lagers—are as complex, interesting and approachable as the people who make and enjoy them.

Here at Upland, our brewers are always experimenting, putting their own spin on traditional brewing recipes with unique local ingredients. Our beers—from wood-aged sour ales to traditional ales and lagers—are as complex, interesting and approachable as the people who make and enjoy them.

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Dubuisson Peche Mel Scaldis Fruited Ale Belgian Inspiration 16 8.50
Dubuisson Peche Mel Scaldis Fruited Ale Belgian Inspiration 16 8.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

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Malt Variety

Dubuisson Peche Mel Scaldis

The Pêche Mel Scaldis was born as a popular student cocktail. Now, it is a combination of the Scaldis Amber and a peach beer.

The Pêche Mel Scaldis has been brewed since 2009 by Brasserie Dubuisson. It is produced with the same care ...

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The Pêche Mel Scaldis was born as a popular student cocktail. Now, it is a combination of the Scaldis Amber and a peach beer.

The Pêche Mel Scaldis has been brewed since 2009 by Brasserie Dubuisson. It is produced with the same care and attention as the other Bush beers, with its own original recipe containing natural peach extracts. The Pêche Mel Scaldis is highly recommended to lovers of fruit beers with character. The natural fruit aromas and extracts provide a beautiful harmony with the bitterness of the Scaldis Amber, creating a full-mouthed and completely balanced beer. The Pêche Mel Scaldis is a filtered, top-fermented beer with an alcohol volume of 8.5%. Without doubt, this is the strongest Belgian fruit beer.

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Style:
Fruited Ale

Brewery:
Dubuisson

Chaussée de Mons, 28
Pipaix, Wallonia B-7904

https://www.dubuisson.com/

Brasserie Dubuisson was founded in 1769 by Joseph Leroy, an ancestor on the maternal side of the current owner, Hugues Dubuisson. 

In its current location, eight generations of Dubuisson brewers have passed on their skills father to son, and this family-owned brewery remains independent to ...

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Brasserie Dubuisson was founded in 1769 by Joseph Leroy, an ancestor on the maternal side of the current owner, Hugues Dubuisson. 

In its current location, eight generations of Dubuisson brewers have passed on their skills father to son, and this family-owned brewery remains independent to this day.

In fact, the family brewing tradition goes back even further. Before 1769, Joseph Leroy and his team brewed beer in Ghissegnies Castle, directly opposite the current brewery.

The Austrian Holy Roman Empress, Maria-Theresa, put an end to the unfair advantage enjoyed by castle breweries, who were exempt from paying tax. And, when in 1769 a general prohibition on castle breweries was declared, Joseph Leroy decided to set up his own brewery in what is still the home of the Dubuisson Brewery’s. Joseph established himself as an independent farmer-brewer, a small operator brewing the beer enjoyed by the local farm workers. 

It wasn’t until many years later, in 1931, that Alfred Dubuisson closed down the farm to become a full-time brewer. With his brother, Amédée Dubuisson, he bought his parents’ farm-brewery and renamed the business Brasserie Dubuisson Frères.

Between its foundation in 1769 and the year 1931, European history marched past this little farm business. Napoleon’s troops put up their tents here at the start of the 19th century.  The brewery was requisitioned by the Germans in 1914 (and then again in 1940). However, the Dubuisson family turned their fortunes around every single time, re-building their premises and renovating their equipment.

Dub_deco_cadre_41,5x29,5.indd
Dub_deco_cadre_41,5x29,5.indd
Dub_deco_cadre_41,5x29,5.indd
Dub_deco_cadre_41,5x29,5.indd
brasserie
histoire-1
Dub_deco_cadre_41,5x29,5.indd

In 1933 Hugues’ grandfather, Alfred Dubuisson, launched a Belgian degustation beer in the style of the English beers that were so fashionable in those days. This is how the Bush Beer, the English name for Dubuisson Bier, first saw the light. The Bush Beer recipe has remained unchanged for 80 years and Bush/Scaldis is now one of the oldest Belgian brands on the beer market. Ever since its foundation, Brasserie Dubuisson has remained true to its basic principles and values:

  • a 100% independent brewery
  • the production of 100% natural beers without artificial additives
  • a refusal to produce label beers (the same beer marketed under different names)
  • complete control of the brewing process without outsourcing

A brewery with its eyes on the future

In 1990 Hugues Dubuisson opened a new era of development for his company with a steady expansion of the brewery’s range, adding:

  • Scaldis de Noel in 1991,
  • Scaldis Blond in 1998,
  • Cuvée des Trolls in 2000,
  • Pêche Mel Scaldis in 2009,
  • Surfine in 2014,
  • Scaldis Prestige de Charmes in 2015
  • Rasta Trolls in 2018

The evolution of the brewery has increased considerably since 2000, thanks to the establishment of two microbreweries in Louvain-La-Neuve and Bergen and the opening of three establishments in Pipaix, Ath and Tournai.

Such growth requires large investments: fermentation, bottling, bottling line, storage for the barrels, a new warehouse, warm rooms, … In order to  growth and to evolve even further into the future, the Dubuisson Brewery completed an investment program in 2013 of more than 5 million euros.

The highlight was a brand new brewing room and an expansion of the fermentation capacity that doubled the production possibilities of the brewery to more than 100,000 hectoliters annually.

Over the past 6 years, the brewery has doubled its production from 45,000 hectoliters in 2013 to 90,000 hectoliters in 2018!

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Real Ale Brewing Company Persicum Barrel Aged IPA Sour and Funky None 8.40
Real Ale Brewing Company Persicum Barrel Aged IPA Sour and Funky None 8.40

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

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Malt Variety

Real Ale Brewing Company Persicum

IPA base aged in oak for 12 months with peaches added. Dry, funky, and slightly sour.

IPA base aged in oak for 12 months with peaches added. Dry, funky, and slightly sour.

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Style:
Barrel Aged IPA

Brewery:
Real Ale Brewing Company

231 San Saba Ct
Blanco, TX 78606

http://realalebrewing.com/

Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

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Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

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Van Steenberge Piraat Rum Barrel Aged Belgian Strong Pale Belgian Inspiration None 10.50
Van Steenberge Piraat Rum Barrel Aged Belgian Strong Pale Belgian Inspiration None 10.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

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Hops

Malt Variety

Van Steenberge Piraat Rum Barrel Aged

"Brewed in honor of the original seafarers of the 19th century, Piraat Ale seemed destined to be aged in Rum barrels. The Belgian classic and perennial gold medal winner is aged in barrels for the first time since it’s inception. At 10.5% ABV ...

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"Brewed in honor of the original seafarers of the 19th century, Piraat Ale seemed destined to be aged in Rum barrels. The Belgian classic and perennial gold medal winner is aged in barrels for the first time since it’s inception. At 10.5% ABV the beer has a large malt profile which produces flavors of country bread and dried fruits. Due to secondary fermentation in the bottle, Piraat has always been regarded as one of smoothest strong golden ales ever brewed. By aging it in rum barrels the beer picks up vanilla accents, which further rounds out the beer without overpowering the spicy quality which has made Piraat famous." Commercial Description

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Style:
Belgian Strong Pale

Brewery:
Van Steenberge

Lindenlaan 25
Ertvelde, B-9940

http://www.vansteenberge.com/en/

Like many others of its kind, this brewery originated from a ploughland farm, that was also engaged in brewing beer for its own consumption. The first time this brewery was mentioned on paper was in 1784 under the name of "Brouwerij De Peer." It is ...

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Like many others of its kind, this brewery originated from a ploughland farm, that was also engaged in brewing beer for its own consumption. The first time this brewery was mentioned on paper was in 1784 under the name of "Brouwerij De Peer." It is very likely however, that there had been a brewery long before that time but that the farmer, John Baptist De Bruin, a native of the village 'St. Kruis Winkel' which is located not too far from the brewery, did not leave any written documents behind until that point in time.

Gradually, brewing became the farm's main pursuit and eventually all agricultural activities were abandoned between the two World Wars. After John Baptist's death, his widow, Angelina Petronella Schelfout, continued the business. From 1876 on, her nephew Jozef Schelfout gave her a helping hand. The brewery was extended with a malting house and a hops field. Indeed, many inhabitants of Ertvelde, the village where the brewery is located, can remember the two-acres field that belonged to the brewery.

Jozef Schelfout's daughter, Magaretha, married Paul van Steenberge, who became mayor of Ertvelde and even Senator in the Belgian Parliament. It was Paul, who eventually changed the brewery's name into "Brouwerij Bios," Bios meaning life. The beer in stock was labeled "Bios": it was a mixture of young beer weakened with a two year old brew. This style of beer today is called: old Brown. The brewer named the beer "Vlaamse Bourgogne" (Flemisch Burgundy), a proper name for such fine quality beer.

In order to comply with changes in common taste, bottom fermentation was introduced. A new brand was born: "Leute Bock", (Leute = Joy) but a commercial name seemed more suitable, and it became SPARTA PILS. The feasibility of this rather expensive switch to lager, depended entirely on the enormous success of the Flemish Burgundy that paid for the investment: better cooling, new lagering tanks in aluminum. On top of that, the old fashioned barrels were to be replaced by glass bottles!

After WW I, the brewery started the production of lemonade. Mr. Jozef Van Steenberge (son of Paul and brewer till 1990) shepherded his business through the crisis of WW II. A war that unfortunately meant the end of hundreds of Flemish village breweries.

Due to the prospering of regional beers, the brewery knew a tremendous uplift. In 1978, the brewery was able to get hold of the recipe and yeasts from the Augustiner monks in Gent, who decided to stop brewing and license the beer out to the Van Steenberge brewery. The brew-engineer at that time, Mr. De Vroe, refined the AUGUSTIJN ale, and turned it into the show-piece of de Van Steenberge brewery. Today, this beer and other special artisanal beers like the Piraat, Gulden Draak, Bruegel and Bornem, all of top-fermentation, make the brewery grow continuously.

In 1990, Mr. Paul Van Steenberge (Joseph's son) took over the mash staff and the brewery. Enormous investments allowed the brewery to follow the technological evolution closely. By the end of 1992, this resulted in the installation of a completely computerized and automated brewery: a real masterpiece. The first in Belgium at that time.

Where is the brewery today? Last year they produced about 35,000 barrels (50,000 HL) of beer with 31 people. Most of the production is sold in Belgium. The export brings the beer all over the world. The top export market is Italy, followed by Holland and the USA. Then comes France, Spain, Switzerland, Germany and other countries.

The mission of the brewery is to brew an exceptional world class beer product, and to stay independent.

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Prairie Artisan Ales Rainbow Sherbert Fruited Sour Sour and Funky None 5.20
Prairie Artisan Ales Rainbow Sherbert Fruited Sour Sour and Funky None 5.20

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

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None plato

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Malt Variety

Prairie Artisan Ales Rainbow Sherbert

Summer forward sour ale with raspberry, pineapple and orange.

Summer forward sour ale with raspberry, pineapple and orange.

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Style:
Fruited Sour

Brewery:
Prairie Artisan Ales

1803B S 49th W Ave
Tulsa, OK 74107

http://prairieales.com/

Prairie Artisan Ales is a relatively new brewery, founded in 2012 by brothers Chase and Colin Healey in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The Healeys chose the name Prairie Artisan Ales to convey their local roots, but they didn't want it so local that it limited them ...

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Prairie Artisan Ales is a relatively new brewery, founded in 2012 by brothers Chase and Colin Healey in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The Healeys chose the name Prairie Artisan Ales to convey their local roots, but they didn't want it so local that it limited them. To them, Prairie is a product that represents Oklahoma and the Midwest to the rest of world. 

Prior to starting Prairie, Chase was the head brewer at COOP Ale Works. Colin is an artist who now designs the all of the art and labels for the company. 

The brothers launched a successful Kickstarter campaign that raised about $23,000 to buy equipment for their brewery. And Prairie continues to grow. 

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The Collective Brewing Project Raspberry Lime Seltzer Hard Seltzer Besides Beer None 4.50
The Collective Brewing Project Raspberry Lime Seltzer Hard Seltzer Besides Beer None 4.50

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

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Malt Variety

The Collective Brewing Project Raspberry Lime Seltzer

Hard seltzer with raspberry and lime. It tastes like a less sweet soda.

Hard seltzer with raspberry and lime. It tastes like a less sweet soda.

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Style:
Hard Seltzer

Alocoholic seltzer/ soda water

Alocoholic seltzer/ soda water

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Brewery:
The Collective Brewing Project

112 ST LOUIS AVE
Fort Worth, TX 76104

http://www.collectivebrew.com/

The Collective is Fort Worth's first franken-monster of a brewery.  We're an unholy marriage of production brewery and badass taproom.  Ride your bike down to the near southside and hang out in our taproom, talk beer, play cornhole, eat some snacks and sample ...

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The Collective is Fort Worth's first franken-monster of a brewery.  We're an unholy marriage of production brewery and badass taproom.  Ride your bike down to the near southside and hang out in our taproom, talk beer, play cornhole, eat some snacks and sample some of our beer you can't get anywhere else.  You can also hop in your gas guzzler and check out the beers at your favorite watering hole.  

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The Bruery Retreat Imperial IPA Hop-a-licious None 8.60
The Bruery Retreat Imperial IPA Hop-a-licious None 8.60

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Cashmere +

Flavor: Strong Herbal notes with melon and citrus characteristics

Aroma: Mild herbal aroma

Alpha Acids: 7.7 - 9.1%       

Beta Acids: 6.4 - 7.1%                      

Dual Purpose

El Dorado +

Flavor: Sharp citrus bitterness with tropical fruits like mango and apricot.

Aroma: Dried fruit aroma

Alpha Acids: 14 - 16%                     

Beta Acids: 7 - 8%                

Dual Purpose 

Mosaic +

Flavor: Tropical fruits and blueberry notes

Aroma: Complex tropical flavors with some citrus and berry notes.

Alpha Acids: 11.5 - 13.5%               

Beta Acids: 3.2 - 3.9%          

Aroma

Malt Variety

The Bruery Retreat

This hazy DIPA is brewed with a simple malt bill and hopped heavily with fruit-forward Mosaic, Cashmere
and El Dorado. Laced with delicate and aromatic tropical notes along with a bright berry medley and a crisp mouthfeel

This hazy DIPA is brewed with a simple malt bill and hopped heavily with fruit-forward Mosaic, Cashmere
and El Dorado. Laced with delicate and aromatic tropical notes along with a bright berry medley and a crisp mouthfeel

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Style:
Imperial IPA

Imperial IPA
The style is a recent American innovation reflecting the trend of American craft breweries to satisfy their customer’s appetite for more and more hops in their beer. The adjective “Imperial” is arbitrary and simply implies a stronger version of an American IPA ...
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Imperial IPA
The style is a recent American innovation reflecting the trend of American craft breweries to satisfy their customer’s appetite for more and more hops in their beer. The adjective “Imperial” is arbitrary and simply implies a stronger version of an American IPA. “Double," “extra," “extreme” or any other modifier can also be used.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The appearance ranges from golden amber to medium reddish copper. Imperial IPAs are clear with a good head stand with off-white color.

Aroma/Taste
The hop aroma is prominent to intense and can be derived from American, English and Noble varieties. Most versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional resinous or grassy aroma.
The hop flavor is strong and complex and can reflect the use of American, English or Noble hop varieties. There is high to absurdly high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone will generally support the strong hop character and provide the best balance. Malt flavor will be low to medium and is generally clean and malty, although some caramel flavors are acceptable. A long, lingering bitterness is usually present in the aftertaste. There is a medium dry to dry finish. A clean, smooth, alcohol flavor is usually present.
Ingredients
The ingredients of Imperial IPAs are the same as American IPAs with twice the hops: Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American hops and American yeast mashed at lower temperatures to help with high yeast attenuation. The use of brewing sugar is acceptable, as is the use of alternative hop products. 
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint or tulip, depending on alcohol content, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 7.5%-10% and an average IBU range of 80-100. If the ABV is greater than 10 percent, the alcohol will mask the hops.
Examples
A great example of this style is Avery Majaraja. 

History 
The first true Double IPA was brewed by Vinnie Cilurzo at Blind Pig Brewing (Now at Russian River) in 1994. Rouge also began brewing Imperial IPA in the early 1990s. Double IPA was officially recognized as a beer style at the Great American Beer Festival in 2003.  
The “imperialization" of the IPA led to other “imperial styles,” making the word imperial the accepted descriptor for any bigger spin on a classic style. 
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Brewery:
The Bruery

717 Dunn Way
Placentia, CA 92870

http://www.thebruery.com/

The Bruery is a boutique craft brewery located in Orange County, CA specializing in barrel aged and experimental ales. Founded as a small, friend & family run business in 2008, The Bruery takes it’s unique moniker from founder Patrick Rue’s family surname.

Patrick picked ...

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The Bruery is a boutique craft brewery located in Orange County, CA specializing in barrel aged and experimental ales. Founded as a small, friend & family run business in 2008, The Bruery takes it’s unique moniker from founder Patrick Rue’s family surname.

Patrick picked up homebrewing as a hobby, later to become an obsession, as a distraction to the banality of law school. Soon he was winning numerous awards for his beers and driving his wife, Rachel, mad with the messes that he would leave on the kitchen stove. Upon finishing school, he took it upon himself to draw up a business plan rather than study for the California Bar exam – a risky endeavor that shows through still today in the creative, genre-tilting beers that The Bruery prides itself on.

The Bruery is founded on the excitement that Patrick felt in those first years of homebrewing and we continue to strive for that same passion in every aspect of our business today. We never stop challenging ourselves to develop distinctive & imaginative beers, constantly pursuing improvement in all that we do. We brew dozens of original beers each year with our list of ingredients and inspirations growing perpetually. Our collection of oak barrels has also become a primary element of our brewery. Nearly half of our beer is aged in wine or spirit barrels bringing forth flavors reminiscent of the Belgian countryside or classic American distillers.

We greatly value our customers as well as our employees at The Bruery and want to give them all an impassioned way to spend their time while sharing a beer worth talking about.

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Sierra Nevada Rum Barrel Aged Quad Barrel Aged Quad Belgian Inspiration None 9.80
Sierra Nevada Rum Barrel Aged Quad Barrel Aged Quad Belgian Inspiration None 9.80

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Sierra Nevada Rum Barrel Aged Quad

The classic quad in rum barrels is a nod to the great Trappist brewers of Belgium. Deep ruby-brown in color, the beer is rixh and full-bodied with the style's familiar dark fruit flavors, while the yeast creates a hint of spice. Rum barrels impart ...

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The classic quad in rum barrels is a nod to the great Trappist brewers of Belgium. Deep ruby-brown in color, the beer is rixh and full-bodied with the style's familiar dark fruit flavors, while the yeast creates a hint of spice. Rum barrels impart delicate sweetness and complexity.

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Style:
Barrel Aged Quad

Brewery:
Sierra Nevada

1075 E. 20th St.
Chico, CA 95928

http://www.sierranevada.com/

In 1979, Ken Grossman began building a small brewery in the town of Chico, California. His goal: to brew exceptional ales and lagers. Today, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is considered the premier craft brewery in the United States. And the beer? Critics proclaim it, “Among ...

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In 1979, Ken Grossman began building a small brewery in the town of Chico, California. His goal: to brew exceptional ales and lagers. Today, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is considered the premier craft brewery in the United States. And the beer? Critics proclaim it, “Among the best brewed anywhere in the world.” 

Ken’s passion for brewing began when a friend’s father showed him the basics of homebrewing. Using homemade equipment, he began brewing five-gallon batches of beer on his own and soon became a proficient home brewer. 

In 1976, after studying chemistry and physics at Butte Community College and California State University, Chico, he opened his own store, The Home Brew Shop. There, he supplied Chico’s homebrewing community with equipment, materials and advice, but dreamed of opening his own brewery. 

Two years later, it was time to make the dream a reality. Ken cobbled together a brewery from dairy tanks, a soft-drink bottler and equipment salvaged from defunct breweries. Though the equipment was secondhand, he created a first-rate microbrewery. The ingredients were premium, including the copious quantities of hops that would become the brewery’s trademark. An avid backpacker, Ken named the new company for his favorite hiking grounds—the Sierra Nevada Mountains. 

On November 15, 1980, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. brewed the first batch of what would soon become a landmark in American craft brewing: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Word spread quickly and over the next decade the demand for Sierra Nevada brews soon exceeded the brewery’s modest brewing capacity. Despite nearly constant additions to the brewery, Ken was soon back at the drawing board, planning a new brewery. In 1989, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. moved to its current site. 

Ken traveled to Germany and brought back a used, traditional, 100-barrel copper brewhouse that became the heart of the new brewery. It met demand for a while, but the brewery soon needed to expand again. In 1997, he commissioned a new, larger brewhouse, and coaxed the original coppersmiths out of retirement to match new kettles to the originals. This expansion became the powerhouse that helped bring the brewery’s total capacity to more than 800,000 barrels per year. 

Building the new brewery afforded Sierra Nevada the opportunity to create two stunning showcases, both featuring exceptional dining, live music and its award-winning beers. The Sierra Nevada Taproom and Restaurant has become a destination in its own right. The brewery is also home to the 350-seat Big Room—a beautifully designed live music venue.

Sierra Nevada brewed one million barrels in 2014. Year round beers include Pale Ale (flagship), Torpedo® Extra IPA, Hop Hunter® IPA, Nooner® Pilsner, Porter, Stout, and Kellerweis® Bavarian-Style Wheat.

The soul of Sierra Nevada is the brewery's affinity for whole-cone hops and the special flavors and aromas they provide. Sierra Nevada uses more whole-cone hops than any brewery in the world. They love the aromas from dry-hopped beers so much that they created the revolutionary “Hop Torpedo,” a sleek, stainless steel device they use to gather the most hop flavor and aroma without imparting any excess bitterness.

In every aspect of the brewery, Sierra Nevada strives to be as environmentally responsible as possible. From recycling and composting to water treatment, bio-fuel production and water conservation, the brewery works hard to minimize its impact on the environment. In 2008, Sierra Nevada completed construction of one of the largest privately owned solar arrays in the country with more than 10,000 panels that provide nearly 20% of the brewery's total energy needs. 

In 2005, Sierra Nevada was the first brewery to install hydrogen fuel cells; the combination of the solar array and the fuel cell system generates more than half of the brewery’s energy needs on site. They also have an extensive water treatment program including our own wastewater treatment facility. 

Through extensive recycling, reuse and composting programs, the brewery is able to divert 99.8% of its solid waste from landfills. 

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. was named a “Green Power Partner” in 2011 by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and "Green Business of the Year" in 2010 by the EPA for its practices in sustainability.

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Ommegang Saison Rose Sour Ale Sour and Funky 18 7.70
Ommegang Saison Rose Sour Ale Sour and Funky 18 7.70

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Ommegang Saison Rose

This blend of saisons, one aged in oak, the other brewed with hibiscus flowers and co-fermented with chardonnay grape juice, is fruity, tart, dry, and incredibly quaffable. 

This blend of saisons, one aged in oak, the other brewed with hibiscus flowers and co-fermented with chardonnay grape juice, is fruity, tart, dry, and incredibly quaffable. 

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Style:
Sour Ale

Brewery:
Ommegang

656 County Highway 33
Cooperstown, NY 13326

http://www.ommegang.com/

Brewery Ommegang was founded by Don Feinberg and Wendy Littlefield with a mission to brew world-class Belgian-style ales in 1997. The original brewery was modeled after a traditional Belgian farmhouse, set on a former hop farm in the Susqehanna River Valley, just south of Cooperstown ...

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Brewery Ommegang was founded by Don Feinberg and Wendy Littlefield with a mission to brew world-class Belgian-style ales in 1997. The original brewery was modeled after a traditional Belgian farmhouse, set on a former hop farm in the Susqehanna River Valley, just south of Cooperstown, New York. As demand for quality, bottle-conditioned Belgian-style ales increased, Ommegang could no longer keep up, and in 2005 the brewery expanded its production capacity by 40 percent to meet the new demand. Brewery Ommegang have firmly established themselves as the foremost brewery in the United States for bottle-conditioned Belgian-style ales.

Since its inception, Brewery Ommegang has been committed to making the best Belgian-style ales possible, and has been recognized for their craft, taking home the Gold Medal in 2004 from the Great American Beer Fest for their Hennepin in the French and Belgian-style Saisons category. Their Abbey ale took home the Gold Medal in 2010 from the World Beer Cup, in the Belgian Dubbel Ale category, and their Witte ale took home the Gold Medal in 2011 from the Great American Beer Fest in the Belgian-style Witbier category.

In 2013, Ommegang partnered with HBO on their hugely successful Game of Thrones series of beers, inspired limited runs of beers inspired by the series. 

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Eureka Heights Brewing Company Shower Tears Gose Sour and Funky 8 4.70
Eureka Heights Brewing Company Shower Tears Gose Sour and Funky 8 4.70

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Eureka Heights Brewing Company Shower Tears

Gose with blackberries added.

Gose with blackberries added.

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Style:
Gose

Brewery:
Eureka Heights Brewing Company

941 W 18TH ST
Houston, Texas 77008

http://www.eurekaheights.com/

New brewery in the Heights

New brewery in the Heights

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Odell Brewing Company Sippin Pretty Fruited Sour Sour and Funky None 4.50
Odell Brewing Company Sippin Pretty Fruited Sour Sour and Funky None 4.50

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Odell Brewing Company Sippin Pretty

Loaded with our unique blend of açai, guava, and elderberry, and balanced with a delicate addition of Himalayan pink sea salt, this beer pops with a bright ruby color and a refreshing tart finish.

Loaded with our unique blend of açai, guava, and elderberry, and balanced with a delicate addition of Himalayan pink sea salt, this beer pops with a bright ruby color and a refreshing tart finish.

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Style:
Fruited Sour

Brewery:
Odell Brewing Company

800 East Lincoln Avenue
Fort Collins, CO 80524

http://odellbrewing.com/

Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create ...

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Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create quality, hand-crafted, innovative brews.

In 2009, having outgrown every inch and aspect of their previous brewery, Odell doubled its plant size to 45,000 square feet and its beer sold to 45,000 barrels—one barrel per square foot! 

As a regional craft brewery, Odell Brewing is committed to serving the communities in which it distributes by sourcing local raw materials, and through its charitable giving program known as Odell Outreach. Odell Brewing is an award winning brewery, nationally and internationally. 

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Sixpoint Brewery Sparkler IPA Hop-a-licious 6 7.00
Sixpoint Brewery Sparkler IPA Hop-a-licious 6 7.00

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Citra +

Flavor: Lemon/lime and tropical fruitiness.

Aroma: Very clean citrus aroma.

Alpha Acids: 10 - 14%         

Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

Aroma

Mosaic +

Flavor: Tropical fruits and blueberry notes

Aroma: Complex tropical flavors with some citrus and berry notes.

Alpha Acids: 11.5 - 13.5%               

Beta Acids: 3.2 - 3.9%          

Aroma

Malt Variety

Sixpoint Brewery Sparkler

The hop character is incredible, but the body of the beer is what really sparkles... it's brewed to be extra dry effervescent

The hop character is incredible, but the body of the beer is what really sparkles... it's brewed to be extra dry effervescent

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Style:
IPA

IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category ...
read more
IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

Aroma/Taste
A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
Ingredients
IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
Examples
Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

History 
The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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Brewery:
Sixpoint Brewery

40 Van Dyke St
Brooklyn, New York 11231

http://sixpoint.com/

While some historical records indicate Sixpoint Brewery was founded in 2004, the real birth of Sixpoint begins at the dawn of civilization. That is when the earliest societies began cultivating cereal grains to make fermented beverages, and the desire for excellence in the craft of ...

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While some historical records indicate Sixpoint Brewery was founded in 2004, the real birth of Sixpoint begins at the dawn of civilization. That is when the earliest societies began cultivating cereal grains to make fermented beverages, and the desire for excellence in the craft of brewing was forged. Even during the earliest civilizations, rich iconography had adorned various brewing vessels, and pictographs depicting the craft of brewing were rife with symbolism. One symbol has transcended and survived throughout the ages - the Sixpoint Brewers' star.

The idea of "Sixpoint" as a code of brewing has resiliently persevered over centuries of rapid human development. But it has not been a journey without struggle or conflict. The symbol was very prominent during the medieval period and up until the early 1900s, but its popularity and visibility started to wane within the last century. After 1950, Sixpoint was nearly snuffed out and one of the cornerstone crafts of our civilization was nearly extinguished. Was Sixpoint dead, or just dormant?

The shimmering light of the Brewer's star started to shine once again in 2004 with its reincarnation as "Sixpoint Craft Ales." This is when the Sixpoint Brew Crew not only resurrected the Sixpoint Brewers' Star, but also breathed life into a patchwork of brewing equipment within an 800 square foot garage in a then-dilapidated neighborhood of Brooklyn, NYC called Red Hook. The original creations of Sixpoint Craft Ales were a mash-up of professional brewing experiences, global brewery influences, and unbridled homebrew proliferation. Out of this modest maritime enclave hundreds of delicious craft brews were concocted and disseminated, and the star had been reborn.

The reincarnated star proved to have an attractive radiance. The historical traditions of craftsmanship that had been coursing through the veins of others also drew them to Sixpoint. Within years, a team of Sixpoint Brewers and Staff had gathered underneath the Sixpoint star, not knowing how they arrived there, but knowing they must keep the Sixpoint tradition alive.

Sixpoint Brewery: Founded in 2004; born at the dawn of civilization.

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Moody Tongue Steeped Emperor's Lemon Saison Farmhouse Saison Belgian Inspiration None 6.30
Moody Tongue Steeped Emperor's Lemon Saison Farmhouse Saison Belgian Inspiration None 6.30

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Moody Tongue Steeped Emperor's Lemon Saison

carries the flavors of a lemon meringue pie alongside the aromatics of Meyer lemons. The resulting Saison has a pineapple color and a dry finish.

carries the flavors of a lemon meringue pie alongside the aromatics of Meyer lemons. The resulting Saison has a pineapple color and a dry finish.

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Style:
Farmhouse Saison

Brewery:
Moody Tongue

The Glass Factory, Building 3
Chicago, IL 60608

https://www.moodytongue.com/

At Moody Tongue, our goal is to create thoughtful, exciting beers that blend familiar flavors with quality ingredients through our philosophy of culinary brewing: using a chef’s mindset to highlight flavors and aromatics in balanced beers.

Culinary brewing rests on three principles:

  • Sourcing the ...
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At Moody Tongue, our goal is to create thoughtful, exciting beers that blend familiar flavors with quality ingredients through our philosophy of culinary brewing: using a chef’s mindset to highlight flavors and aromatics in balanced beers.

Culinary brewing rests on three principles:

  • Sourcing the highest quality ingredients
  • Understanding how best to handle those ingredients to showcase flavors and aromatics
  • Knowing when during the brewing process to incorporate these ingredients

Brewmaster Jared Rouben draws on his culinary training to forge this connection between the kitchen and our brewery, building recipes for our beers in the same manner a chef would for a dish. Our beers are created with simplicity and balance in mind, and can be enjoyed both on their own or paired with food.

Beer is our food. We look forward to feeding your moody tongue.

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North Peak Brewing Company Stormy IPA Hop-a-licious 71 7.20
North Peak Brewing Company Stormy IPA Hop-a-licious 71 7.20

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Cascade +

Flavor: Intense citrus, grapefruit and piney notes.

Aroma: Spicy flowers and some grass.

Alpha Acids: 4.5 - 7%                      

Beta Acids: 4.5 - 7%                         

Dual Purpose 

Centennial +

Flavor: Slightly more bitter than Cascade with some strong grapefruit notes and spicy tones.

Aroma: Grapefruit and herbal notes.

Alpha Acids: 9.5 - 11.5%     

Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

Dual Purpose

Chinook +

Flavor: Harsh bitterness with and emphasis on spice and earthiness

Aroma: Spicy with some pine and smokiness

Alpha Acids: 12 - 14%         

Beta Acids: 3 - 4%                            

Bittering

Crystal +

Flavor: Woody, grassy. Almost veggie-like.

Aroma: Very mild floral with some black pepper showing through.

Alpha Acids: 3.5 - 6%                                  

Beta Acids: 4.5 - 6.5%          

Aroma

Mosaic +

Flavor: Tropical fruits and blueberry notes

Aroma: Complex tropical flavors with some citrus and berry notes.

Alpha Acids: 11.5 - 13.5%               

Beta Acids: 3.2 - 3.9%          

Aroma

Simcoe +

Flavor: Very unique blend of citrus and pine.

Aroma: Pine tree, citrus and passion fruit. Very unique.

Alpha Acids: 12 - 14%                     

Beta Acids: 4 - 5%                

Dual Purpose

Malt Variety

Pilsner +

Vienna +

North Peak Brewing Company Stormy

Dry-hopped with over five pounds per barrel of Simcoe, Cascade, Mosaic, Crystal and MI grown Chinook and Centennial hops flood Stormy with sweet citrus and floral aromas. A whirlwind of flavors from tropical fruit notes, such as mango and papaya, to berries and citrus, meld ...

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Dry-hopped with over five pounds per barrel of Simcoe, Cascade, Mosaic, Crystal and MI grown Chinook and Centennial hops flood Stormy with sweet citrus and floral aromas. A whirlwind of flavors from tropical fruit notes, such as mango and papaya, to berries and citrus, meld perfectly with its moderate hop bitterness throughout the finish.

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Style:
IPA

IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category ...
read more
IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

Aroma/Taste
A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
Ingredients
IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
Examples
Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

History 
The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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Brewery:
North Peak Brewing Company

400 West Front Street
Traverse City, MI 49684

http://www.northpeak.net/

North Peak Brewing Company is located in a historic building which was formerly the Big Daylight Candy Factory.

In March of 1899, a partnership was formed by John G. Straub, his brother, Anton F. Straub and George E. Amiotte in the creation of candies and ...

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North Peak Brewing Company is located in a historic building which was formerly the Big Daylight Candy Factory.

In March of 1899, a partnership was formed by John G. Straub, his brother, Anton F. Straub and George E. Amiotte in the creation of candies and confectionary in Traverse City.

Under the style of Straub Brothers and Amiotte, the firm soon established success with a large local following and an extensive wholesale trade. So rapidly did the business increase, that it became necessary to provide a building of sufficient capacity to meet the growing demands of the trade.

The building housing North Peak Brewing Company was Straub’s third and final building. Straub Brothers and Amiotte "Big Daylight Candy Factory" is a handsome imposing brick edifice of three floors and a basement. It was constructed with 400,000 bricks and 250,000 feet of lumber, erected and supplied with the latest and most approved machinery devices for the manufacturing of all kinds of candies. It compared favorably on a scale with the largest and most successful establishments of its kind.

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Legal Draft Beer Company Tartfeasor Berliner Weisse Sour and Funky None 7.30
Legal Draft Beer Company Tartfeasor Berliner Weisse Sour and Funky None 7.30

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Legal Draft Beer Company Tartfeasor

Style:
Berliner Weisse

Berliner Weisse

The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat to ...

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Berliner Weisse

The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat to use the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably). Weissbier is German for “white beer.” Weissbiers were much paler than the dark beers that were so popular in Bavaria in earlier times, so the word “white” is used relatively. By today’s standards, Weissbier is more golden due to the development of  light beers like Pilsner and Helles.

Berliner Weisse is the one style of Weissbeer not held to the German standard of 50% wheat. 

Appearance 
The appearance of Berliner Weisse is pale straw to very dark gold in color. A light haziness can be expected, but is not required. A very thick, mousse-like, long-lasting white head is characteristic. 

Aroma/Flavor
Lactic acid sourness is the most notable aroma.  Moderate to strong phenols and fruity esters are also present. Noble hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma may be present. Acceptable aromatics can include a light, citrusy tartness, a light to moderate vanilla character and a low bubblegum and banana aroma, as well as the keystone lactic sourness.

The style has a mild sour flavor with a light and fruity character.

Ingredients 
According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50% wheat, but Berliner Weiss is the one weissbeer not held to this restriction. A traditional decoction mash is used to give the beer body and mouthfeel.

Glassware and Serving Temperature 
At Hay Merchant we will serve this style in a 20oz German Pilsner glass or English Pint poured from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

Stats
Beers of this style are most often 2%-3.5% ABV and 8-15 IBU. 

Example
A great example of this style is Saint Arnold Boiler Room. 

History 
By the end of the middle ages in Germany, both barley and wheat were being used to make a top-fermented beer. The first true Weissbiers were made toward the end of the 15th century. In 1602, Duke Maximilian I placed a ban on public Weissbier brewing, and the Bavarian House of Dukes became the only body with the legal authority to brew Weissbiers. The profits from Prince Maximilian’s Weiss brewing helped fund the Thirty Years War.

As the popularity of Weissbier waned, the German House of Dukes begin to outsource the reasonability to brew to the private sector around the early part of the 1800s but still maintained control.

But the move to private brewing would not be enough to save Weissbier from extinction.  In 1855, Georg Schneider bought Wesses Brauhaus in Munich. In 1872, he worked a deal that ended the 250 year reign of royal brewing and allowed him to operate under his own terms. Even still, it wasn’t until the end of World War II that Weissbier regained its place as the No. 1 beer in Germany. Weissbier accounts for around 22 percent of the German market. It’s the No. 1 selling micro-brewed style in Australia and can be found in the lineup of many American microbreweries.

Berliner Weisse slowly found its definition from the 17th to the 20th century. At the heights of its popularity in the 19th century, there were more than 700 breweries making the style.  There isn’t a written history to the style’s exact origins, but two theories are possible. The first states that 18th century French immigrants came to Berlin via Flanders and picked up the techniques required to make sour beer from the producers of Flemish sour Red Ale.  The second theory points to a beer brewed in Berlin in the 1640s called Halberstadter Brogan that was based on an unknown style from Hamburg. 

We do know that the style has not always been sour.  It was a light wheat beer—about 50/50 wheat and barley.  The beer was about 3% ABV and, most importantly, not boiled. The hops were boiled in a separate vessel, and then the boiling hop water was added to the mash to increase the temperature. Hops were also added to the mash itself, making it easier for the wort to run off in a straw bed. The lack of a wort boil led to a lack of sterilization, and it’s easy to imagine that huge levels of microorganisms had to be present, thanks to the straw bed and other factors. This would not be true spontaneous fermentation as we see in Lambics because the micros would have come from the straw. 

These production methods led to three opportunities for lactic acid bacteria to infect the beer: 1) during the mash if left sitting at a low temperature, 2) during fermentation due to yeast cross contamination, and 3) in storage due to micro flora in the wooden barrels. 

As the popularity of wheat beers began to wain across Germany prior to World War I, so did the popularity of Berliner Weisse. Lighter, less flavorful beers began to gain popularity, so the breweries serving Berliner Weisse began to add flavored syrups to the beer to make it more acceptable to the average drinker. Today, there are only two commercial brewers in Berlin making the style. 

As of 2014, the style found new popularity in American craft beer, with more than 100 craft breweries releasing versions of the beer that year alone. It owes its newfound popularity to the overall rise in popularity of sour beers. Most American craft brewers use a mash rest to achieve the desired levels of lactic acid.  Once the mash process is completed, the brewer leaves the mash in the tun for several days.  Once the PH reaches the desired level, the wort is run off to the boil kettle.  Boiling the wort sanitizes the beer and ensures that the beer keeps its lactic acid flavor without exposing the rest of the brewery to contamination. 

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Brewery:
Legal Draft Beer Company

500 E Division st
Arlington, TX 76011

http://www.legaldraftbeer.com/

We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and ...

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We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and are meant to stand up with the best beers in our state, our nation, and the world. We hope you’ll enjoy them with your family and friends in our taproom and beer garden, or at your favorite watering hole.

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American Solera Terpy Citra Imperial IPA Hop-a-licious None 8.00
American Solera Terpy Citra Imperial IPA Hop-a-licious None 8.00

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Citra +

Flavor: Lemon/lime and tropical fruitiness.

Aroma: Very clean citrus aroma.

Alpha Acids: 10 - 14%         

Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

Aroma

Malt Variety

American Solera Terpy Citra

Single hop double IPA with Citra hops

Single hop double IPA with Citra hops

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Style:
Imperial IPA

Imperial IPA
The style is a recent American innovation reflecting the trend of American craft breweries to satisfy their customer’s appetite for more and more hops in their beer. The adjective “Imperial” is arbitrary and simply implies a stronger version of an American IPA ...
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Imperial IPA
The style is a recent American innovation reflecting the trend of American craft breweries to satisfy their customer’s appetite for more and more hops in their beer. The adjective “Imperial” is arbitrary and simply implies a stronger version of an American IPA. “Double," “extra," “extreme” or any other modifier can also be used.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The appearance ranges from golden amber to medium reddish copper. Imperial IPAs are clear with a good head stand with off-white color.

Aroma/Taste
The hop aroma is prominent to intense and can be derived from American, English and Noble varieties. Most versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional resinous or grassy aroma.
The hop flavor is strong and complex and can reflect the use of American, English or Noble hop varieties. There is high to absurdly high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone will generally support the strong hop character and provide the best balance. Malt flavor will be low to medium and is generally clean and malty, although some caramel flavors are acceptable. A long, lingering bitterness is usually present in the aftertaste. There is a medium dry to dry finish. A clean, smooth, alcohol flavor is usually present.
Ingredients
The ingredients of Imperial IPAs are the same as American IPAs with twice the hops: Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American hops and American yeast mashed at lower temperatures to help with high yeast attenuation. The use of brewing sugar is acceptable, as is the use of alternative hop products. 
Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint or tulip, depending on alcohol content, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 7.5%-10% and an average IBU range of 80-100. If the ABV is greater than 10 percent, the alcohol will mask the hops.
Examples
A great example of this style is Avery Majaraja. 

History 
The first true Double IPA was brewed by Vinnie Cilurzo at Blind Pig Brewing (Now at Russian River) in 1994. Rouge also began brewing Imperial IPA in the early 1990s. Double IPA was officially recognized as a beer style at the Great American Beer Festival in 2003.  
The “imperialization" of the IPA led to other “imperial styles,” making the word imperial the accepted descriptor for any bigger spin on a classic style. 
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Brewery:
American Solera

1702 E 6th St
Tulsa, OK 74104

https://americansolera.com/

A creative craft brewery specializing in the oak barrel aging process. Most of our beers are aged 6 to 18 months prior to bottling. Giving each beer its own unique flavor profile. And with a cellar of 16 foeders, puncheons, and wine barrels the possibilities ...

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A creative craft brewery specializing in the oak barrel aging process. Most of our beers are aged 6 to 18 months prior to bottling. Giving each beer its own unique flavor profile. And with a cellar of 16 foeders, puncheons, and wine barrels the possibilities are endless.

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Alvinne The Oak Melchior Special Edition Pur Sang Belgian Strong Pale The Lighter Side of Life None 11.00
Alvinne The Oak Melchior Special Edition Pur Sang Belgian Strong Pale The Lighter Side of Life None 11.00

Glassware

Bottle Size

500mL

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Alvinne The Oak Melchior Special Edition Pur Sang

 fruity, woody sour notes with a hint of Brett 

 fruity, woody sour notes with a hint of Brett 

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Style:
Belgian Strong Pale

Brewery:
Alvinne

Vaartstraat 4a
Zwevegem, 8552

http://www.alvinne.be/

Alvinne Brewery is a microbrewery localed in the beautiful West Flanders "Land of Mortagne."  The name of the brewery derives from of local folk tales, who can be seen depicted on the brewery's logo and labels.

The brewery creates a wide range of beers ...

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Alvinne Brewery is a microbrewery localed in the beautiful West Flanders "Land of Mortagne."  The name of the brewery derives from of local folk tales, who can be seen depicted on the brewery's logo and labels.

The brewery creates a wide range of beers, including versions of 'traditional' Belgian styles such as Strong Golden Ales, Abbey-style beers and Saison, as well as original creations that cross stylistic boundaries and beers inspired by styles from outside their home country like Imperial Stout.

Although quite small and a newcomer to the Belgian brewing world, being founded in 2002, Alvinne has gained international attention, no small feat in this brewery-intensive nation.

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Fifty Fifty Brewing Company Totality Russian Imperial Stout Dark and Flavorful 75 9.50
Fifty Fifty Brewing Company Totality Russian Imperial Stout Dark and Flavorful 75 9.50

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Fifty Fifty Brewing Company Totality

Our award winning Imperial Stout, Totality, also serves as the base beer for the internationally acclaimed barrel aged eclipse. Rich dark chocolate, mocha, and espresso flavors.

Our award winning Imperial Stout, Totality, also serves as the base beer for the internationally acclaimed barrel aged eclipse. Rich dark chocolate, mocha, and espresso flavors.

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Style:
Russian Imperial Stout

Brewery:
Fifty Fifty Brewing Company

11197 Brockway Rd Suite 1
Truckee, CA 96161

https://fiftyfiftybrewing.com/

Laid-back local microbrewery & pub with a diverse menu plus retail beer & logo merchandise.

Laid-back local microbrewery & pub with a diverse menu plus retail beer & logo merchandise.

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Bell's Brewery Two Hearted IPA Hop-a-licious None 7.00
Bell's Brewery Two Hearted IPA Hop-a-licious None 7.00

Glassware

American Pint

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

1.060 gravity

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Centennial +

Flavor: Slightly more bitter than Cascade with some strong grapefruit notes and spicy tones.

Aroma: Grapefruit and herbal notes.

Alpha Acids: 9.5 - 11.5%     

Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

Dual Purpose

Malt Variety

Bell's Brewery Two Hearted

Named after The Two Hearted river in north Michigan. 100% Centennial hops 2 grapefruit and dank pine. Balanced malt backbone.

Named after The Two Hearted river in north Michigan. 100% Centennial hops 2 grapefruit and dank pine. Balanced malt backbone.

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Style:
IPA

IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category ...
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IPA (India Pale Ale) 
Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
About Pale Ales
Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

Appearance
The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

Aroma/Taste
A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
Ingredients
IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

Glassware and Serving Temperature
At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

Stats
This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
Examples
Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

History 
The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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Brewery:
Bell's Brewery

355 E. Kalamazoo Avenue
Kalamazoo, MI 49007

https://www.bellsbeer.com/

Bell's Brewery, Inc. is a brewing company based in Kalamazoo, Michigan, with a second brewery in Comstock, Michigan. Bell's also has a brewpub called the Eccentric Cafe.

Larry Bell incorporated The Kalamazoo Brewing Company, Inc., in 1983 as a home-brewing supply shop. In ...

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Bell's Brewery, Inc. is a brewing company based in Kalamazoo, Michigan, with a second brewery in Comstock, Michigan. Bell's also has a brewpub called the Eccentric Cafe.

Larry Bell incorporated The Kalamazoo Brewing Company, Inc., in 1983 as a home-brewing supply shop. In 1985, it began to sell its own beer, producing 135 barrels in its first year.

The brewery today consists of two separate brewing facilities, the original Kalamazoo Avenue facility, and the state-of-the-art Krum Avenue brewery, in Comstock, Michigan, which opened in 2003. The Kalamazoo Avenue brewery is adjacent to its pub—Bell's Eccentric Cafe—and a General Store which sells Bell's beer and apparel, as well as homebrewing supplies.

As of 2005, Kalamazoo Brewing Company changed their name to Bell's Brewery, Inc., reflecting the name by which most people refer to the brewery; it was formally reincorporated as Bell's Brewery, Inc., in 2006.

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The Bruery Vermont Sticky Maple Barrel Aged Imperial Stout Dark and Flavorful None 11.30
The Bruery Vermont Sticky Maple Barrel Aged Imperial Stout Dark and Flavorful None 11.30

Glassware

Snifter

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

The Bruery Vermont Sticky Maple

We scoured the hills of the green mountain state to find the perfect maple syrup to complement this barrel-aged imperial stout. Sticky and decadent, with a subtly sweet and big, bold mouthfeel.

Imperial Stout aged in Bourbon Barrels with Maple Syrup.

We scoured the hills of the green mountain state to find the perfect maple syrup to complement this barrel-aged imperial stout. Sticky and decadent, with a subtly sweet and big, bold mouthfeel.

Imperial Stout aged in Bourbon Barrels with Maple Syrup.

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Style:
Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

Brewery:
The Bruery

717 Dunn Way
Placentia, CA 92870

http://www.thebruery.com/

The Bruery is a boutique craft brewery located in Orange County, CA specializing in barrel aged and experimental ales. Founded as a small, friend & family run business in 2008, The Bruery takes it’s unique moniker from founder Patrick Rue’s family surname.

Patrick picked ...

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The Bruery is a boutique craft brewery located in Orange County, CA specializing in barrel aged and experimental ales. Founded as a small, friend & family run business in 2008, The Bruery takes it’s unique moniker from founder Patrick Rue’s family surname.

Patrick picked up homebrewing as a hobby, later to become an obsession, as a distraction to the banality of law school. Soon he was winning numerous awards for his beers and driving his wife, Rachel, mad with the messes that he would leave on the kitchen stove. Upon finishing school, he took it upon himself to draw up a business plan rather than study for the California Bar exam – a risky endeavor that shows through still today in the creative, genre-tilting beers that The Bruery prides itself on.

The Bruery is founded on the excitement that Patrick felt in those first years of homebrewing and we continue to strive for that same passion in every aspect of our business today. We never stop challenging ourselves to develop distinctive & imaginative beers, constantly pursuing improvement in all that we do. We brew dozens of original beers each year with our list of ingredients and inspirations growing perpetually. Our collection of oak barrels has also become a primary element of our brewery. Nearly half of our beer is aged in wine or spirit barrels bringing forth flavors reminiscent of the Belgian countryside or classic American distillers.

We greatly value our customers as well as our employees at The Bruery and want to give them all an impassioned way to spend their time while sharing a beer worth talking about.

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Austin Eastciders Watermelon Cider Besides Beer None 5.00
Austin Eastciders Watermelon Cider Besides Beer None 5.00

Glassware

Tulip

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

In determination ...

Original Gravity

None plato

Final Gravity

None plato

Hops

Malt Variety

Austin Eastciders Watermelon

Crisp apple, watermelon, tart, honeydew melon, with a dry finish

Crisp apple, watermelon, tart, honeydew melon, with a dry finish

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Style:
Cider

Brewery:
Austin Eastciders

979 Springdale Rd
Austin, TX 78702

http://www.austineastciders.com/

Austin Eastciders makes old-style cider using bittersweet and bittersharp apple varieties to produce ciders which are dryer, smoother and more complex than many modern hard ciders. 

They use antique cider apple varieties, high in tannins and acids, to produce flavors that have not been widely ...

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Austin Eastciders makes old-style cider using bittersweet and bittersharp apple varieties to produce ciders which are dryer, smoother and more complex than many modern hard ciders. 

They use antique cider apple varieties, high in tannins and acids, to produce flavors that have not been widely experienced in America since Prohibition. These are the apples with which hard cider was traditionally made. During Prohibition many cider apple orchards were destroyed, meaning cider has since been made with eating apples. Austin Eastciders uses real cider apples, traditional processes and simple recipes - adding nothing which isn't present naturally in the fruit.

They work with farmers across America to reintroduce vintage apple varieties and to help recultivate the old Southern varieties that thrived back in the day. At one time the South could boast an incredible 1,800 varieties, of which 500 still exist in small amounts today.

Austin Eastciders scours the country looking for sources of super-rare American cider apples like Hewes & Harrison and uniquely Southern cider varieties like Winesap & Arkansas Black. With these, they blend Austin Eastciders 'Small Batch' ciders. Their 'Gold Top' cider is made with more than 40 different bittersweet and bittersharp varieties sourced from old English cider orchards. 'Gold Top' is medium dry, full flavored and deliciously tangy, available on draft and in 16.9oz bottles. 'Eastciders Original' is a blend of American dessert apples and European bittersweets, available in 16oz cans. It's dry and light, fresh and fruity, the perfect summer cider.

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Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Wittekerke Wild Sour Strawberry Sour Ale Sour and Funky None 5.00
Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Wittekerke Wild Sour Strawberry Sour Ale Sour and Funky None 5.00

Glassware

Sour

Bottle Size

SRM Value / Color

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Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Wittekerke Wild Sour Strawberry

Wittekerke Wit with sweet strawberry and the sour flora harvested from the oak foeders (barrels) used in making the famous Petrus Aged Pale. These sweet and sour flavours perfectly compliment one another yielding a complex, refreshing taste.. These sour and tart flavours perfectly balance the ...

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Wittekerke Wit with sweet strawberry and the sour flora harvested from the oak foeders (barrels) used in making the famous Petrus Aged Pale. These sweet and sour flavours perfectly compliment one another yielding a complex, refreshing taste.. These sour and tart flavours perfectly balance the bright citrus zest and light spices yielding a complex, refreshing taste

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Style:
Sour Ale

Brewery:
Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik)

Rijksweg(B) 33
Bavikhove, 8531

http://www.brouwerijdebrabandere.be/home-en

The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other ...

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The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other family members took control of the brewery, changed the name back to Brabandere Brewery and began to open a large number of cafés and pubs. Bradandere expanded its own market base by making the brewery the sole supplier of product to those cafés.

In 1990, the family split the operations of the cafés and the brewery. The brewery was renamed again, this time taking inspiration from the town that had been home to the brewery for almost 100 years—Bavik. Over the next decade, the brewery made some large investments into the brewery itself, modernizing the brewery and expanding capacity, making it one of the largest family-owned breweries in Belgium.

In 2013, the fifth generation of the Brabandere family took over. The decision was made to once again use the family name, and thus the Brabandere Brewery was revived.

In Belgium, beers are traditionally known by their stand alone brand names and not by the brewery name. Brabandere brews  three main brands: Bavik, Wittekerke and Petrus. Bavik is best known for the Pilsner, a light, refreshing, slightly hopped bohemian rendition of the style. Wittekerke is the brand used to sell wheat beers. Petrus is the moniker that adorns the “special” beers—usually higher in alcohol or anything different from the core brand of that particular brewery, not always referring to the same style of beer. The most notable beer from the Petrus line is the Aged Pale: 100 percent pale malts, dry hopped and aged for at least 18 months in large wooden fermenters. This beer is light in body but aggressively sour in taste—a Hay Merchant favorite.

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Beer

  • Firestone Walker Brewing Company 18th Anniversary
  • Firestone Walker Brewing Company 18th Anniversary

    Style

    Strong Ale

    Category

    Strong Ale

    IBU

    35

    ABV

    13.00

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company 18th Anniversary

    Style:
    Strong Ale

    Brewery:
    Firestone Walker Brewing Company

    1400 Ramada Dr
    Paso Robles , CA 93446

    http://www.firestonebeer.com/

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

    Firestone ...

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    Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

    Firestone Walker’s ales are selectively fermented in the Firestone Union oak barrel brewing system. The Firestone Union incorporates 65-gallon, medium and heavy toast American oak barrels.

    Firestone Walker takes pride in making exceptional pale ales. More recently, they created a seasonal series offering, as well as their Proprietor’s Reserve series of beers, born from their Anniversary program. These vintage and limited release beers are the consummate sipping beers, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family. 

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company continues to grow as the palates of Americans migrate to craft beer. Their brew staff has picked up “Mid Size Brewery of the Year” at the World Beer Cup an unmatched four times.

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • J.W. Lee's 2001 Harvest Ale
  • J.W. Lee's 2001 Harvest Ale

    Style

    English Barley Wine

    Category

    English Barley Wine

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    11.50

    J.W. Lee's 2001 Harvest Ale

    Caramelized Dark Fruits, Toffee, Butterscotch and Slightly Muddled Aged Hops

    Caramelized Dark Fruits, Toffee, Butterscotch and Slightly Muddled Aged Hops

    read less

    Style:
    English Barley Wine

    English Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
    read more
    English Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

    About Strong Ales
    Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
    Appearance
    The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

    Aroma/Taste
    The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
    There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
    Ingredients
    Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
    Examples
    Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

    History 
    This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
    The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
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    Brewery:
    J.W. Lee's

    Greengate Brewery
    Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

    http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

    read more

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

    Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    275mL

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Brewery Liefmans 2010 Goudenband
  • Brewery Liefmans 2010 Goudenband

    Style

    Oud Bruin

    Category

    Oud Bruin

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    8.00

    Brewery Liefmans 2010 Goudenband

    "Infinitely complex in aroma and flavor with notes of maltiness and tartness throughout. An unsurpassed old brown with the richness and complexity of a vintage wine." Commercial Description

    "Infinitely complex in aroma and flavor with notes of maltiness and tartness throughout. An unsurpassed old brown with the richness and complexity of a vintage wine." Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Oud Bruin

    Brewery:
    Brewery Liefmans

    Aalststraat 200
    Oudenaarde, Belgium 9700

    http://www.liefmans.be/

    Belgian brewery which produces oud bruin and other Belgian beers. It was founded in 1679. The company went bankrupt in 2008 and was acquired by Duvel Moortgat. Liefmans' wheat beer, Dentergems Wit, and a Belgian ale, Lucifer, were subsequently taken over by Het Anker Brewery.

    Belgian brewery which produces oud bruin and other Belgian beers. It was founded in 1679. The company went bankrupt in 2008 and was acquired by Duvel Moortgat. Liefmans' wheat beer, Dentergems Wit, and a Belgian ale, Lucifer, were subsequently taken over by Het Anker Brewery.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • J.W. Lee's 2010 Harvest Ale Sherry
  • J.W. Lee's 2010 Harvest Ale Sherry

    Style

    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    Category

    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    11.50

    J.W. Lee's 2010 Harvest Ale Sherry

    sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates.

    sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates.

    read less

    Style:
    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    Brewery:
    J.W. Lee's

    Greengate Brewery
    Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

    http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

    read more

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

    Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    275mL

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • J.W. Lee's 2011 Harvest Ale Calvados
  • J.W. Lee's 2011 Harvest Ale Calvados

    Style

    English Barley Wine

    Category

    English Barley Wine

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    11.50

    J.W. Lee's 2011 Harvest Ale Calvados

    sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates, and faint smoky oak

    sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates, and faint smoky oak

    read less

    Style:
    English Barley Wine

    English Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
    read more
    English Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

    About Strong Ales
    Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
    Appearance
    The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

    Aroma/Taste
    The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
    There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
    Ingredients
    Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
    Examples
    Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

    History 
    This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
    The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
    read less

    Brewery:
    J.W. Lee's

    Greengate Brewery
    Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

    http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

    read more

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

    Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    275mL

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Real Ale Brewing Company 2011 Sisyphus
  • Real Ale Brewing Company 2011 Sisyphus

    Style

    American Barley Wine

    Category

    American Barley Wine

    IBU

    75

    ABV

    11.50

    Real Ale Brewing Company 2011 Sisyphus

    Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey 

    Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey 

    read less

    Style:
    American Barley Wine

    American Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
    read more
    American Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

    About Strong Ales
    Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
    Appearance
    The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

    Aroma/Taste
    The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
    There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
    Ingredients
    Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
    Examples
    Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

    History 
    This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
    The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
    read less

    Brewery:
    Real Ale Brewing Company

    231 San Saba Ct
    Blanco, TX 78606

    http://realalebrewing.com/

    Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

    read more

    Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

    Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

    Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

    Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

    The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

    They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

    Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

    Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

    Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

    In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    12oz

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    24.000 plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Real Ale Brewing Company 2012 Sisyphus
  • Real Ale Brewing Company 2012 Sisyphus

    Style

    American Barley Wine

    Category

    American Barley Wine

    IBU

    75

    ABV

    10.50

    Real Ale Brewing Company 2012 Sisyphus

    Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey 

    Earthy taste with vanilla, caramel, cinnamon, and whiskey 

    read less

    Style:
    American Barley Wine

    American Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
    read more
    American Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

    About Strong Ales
    Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
    Appearance
    The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

    Aroma/Taste
    The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
    There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
    Ingredients
    Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
    Examples
    Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

    History 
    This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
    The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
    read less

    Brewery:
    Real Ale Brewing Company

    231 San Saba Ct
    Blanco, TX 78606

    http://realalebrewing.com/

    Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

    read more

    Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

    Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

    Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

    Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

    The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

    They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

    Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

    Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

    Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

    In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    12oz

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    24.000 plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Sierra Nevada 2013 Bigfoot
  • Sierra Nevada 2013 Bigfoot

    Style

    American Barley Wine

    Category

    American Barley Wine

    IBU

    90

    ABV

    9.60

    Sierra Nevada 2013 Bigfoot

    "Bigfoot is a beast of a beer, brimming with bold flavors of bittersweet malt and heaps of aggressive whole-cone Pacific Northwest hops. First introduced in the winter of 1983, Bigfoot is a cult-classic beer brewed in the barleywine style, meaning a strong, robust, bruiser of ...

    read more

    "Bigfoot is a beast of a beer, brimming with bold flavors of bittersweet malt and heaps of aggressive whole-cone Pacific Northwest hops. First introduced in the winter of 1983, Bigfoot is a cult-classic beer brewed in the barleywine style, meaning a strong, robust, bruiser of a beer with the refined intensity of a wine. Bigfoot is prized by beer collectors for its supreme cellarability. Under the proper conditions, it can age like a fine wine, developing new flavors and character as it matures in the bottle. Each new release or “expedition” is vintage dated. Collect your own and see the flavors develop and progress." Commercial Description

    read less

    Style:
    American Barley Wine

    American Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
    read more
    American Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

    About Strong Ales
    Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
    Appearance
    The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

    Aroma/Taste
    The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
    There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
    Ingredients
    Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
    Examples
    Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

    History 
    This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
    The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
    read less

    Brewery:
    Sierra Nevada

    1075 E. 20th St.
    Chico, CA 95928

    http://www.sierranevada.com/

    In 1979, Ken Grossman began building a small brewery in the town of Chico, California. His goal: to brew exceptional ales and lagers. Today, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is considered the premier craft brewery in the United States. And the beer? Critics proclaim it, “Among ...

    read more

    In 1979, Ken Grossman began building a small brewery in the town of Chico, California. His goal: to brew exceptional ales and lagers. Today, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is considered the premier craft brewery in the United States. And the beer? Critics proclaim it, “Among the best brewed anywhere in the world.” 

    Ken’s passion for brewing began when a friend’s father showed him the basics of homebrewing. Using homemade equipment, he began brewing five-gallon batches of beer on his own and soon became a proficient home brewer. 

    In 1976, after studying chemistry and physics at Butte Community College and California State University, Chico, he opened his own store, The Home Brew Shop. There, he supplied Chico’s homebrewing community with equipment, materials and advice, but dreamed of opening his own brewery. 

    Two years later, it was time to make the dream a reality. Ken cobbled together a brewery from dairy tanks, a soft-drink bottler and equipment salvaged from defunct breweries. Though the equipment was secondhand, he created a first-rate microbrewery. The ingredients were premium, including the copious quantities of hops that would become the brewery’s trademark. An avid backpacker, Ken named the new company for his favorite hiking grounds—the Sierra Nevada Mountains. 

    On November 15, 1980, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. brewed the first batch of what would soon become a landmark in American craft brewing: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Word spread quickly and over the next decade the demand for Sierra Nevada brews soon exceeded the brewery’s modest brewing capacity. Despite nearly constant additions to the brewery, Ken was soon back at the drawing board, planning a new brewery. In 1989, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. moved to its current site. 

    Ken traveled to Germany and brought back a used, traditional, 100-barrel copper brewhouse that became the heart of the new brewery. It met demand for a while, but the brewery soon needed to expand again. In 1997, he commissioned a new, larger brewhouse, and coaxed the original coppersmiths out of retirement to match new kettles to the originals. This expansion became the powerhouse that helped bring the brewery’s total capacity to more than 800,000 barrels per year. 

    Building the new brewery afforded Sierra Nevada the opportunity to create two stunning showcases, both featuring exceptional dining, live music and its award-winning beers. The Sierra Nevada Taproom and Restaurant has become a destination in its own right. The brewery is also home to the 350-seat Big Room—a beautifully designed live music venue.

    Sierra Nevada brewed one million barrels in 2014. Year round beers include Pale Ale (flagship), Torpedo® Extra IPA, Hop Hunter® IPA, Nooner® Pilsner, Porter, Stout, and Kellerweis® Bavarian-Style Wheat.

    The soul of Sierra Nevada is the brewery's affinity for whole-cone hops and the special flavors and aromas they provide. Sierra Nevada uses more whole-cone hops than any brewery in the world. They love the aromas from dry-hopped beers so much that they created the revolutionary “Hop Torpedo,” a sleek, stainless steel device they use to gather the most hop flavor and aroma without imparting any excess bitterness.

    In every aspect of the brewery, Sierra Nevada strives to be as environmentally responsible as possible. From recycling and composting to water treatment, bio-fuel production and water conservation, the brewery works hard to minimize its impact on the environment. In 2008, Sierra Nevada completed construction of one of the largest privately owned solar arrays in the country with more than 10,000 panels that provide nearly 20% of the brewery's total energy needs. 

    In 2005, Sierra Nevada was the first brewery to install hydrogen fuel cells; the combination of the solar array and the fuel cell system generates more than half of the brewery’s energy needs on site. They also have an extensive water treatment program including our own wastewater treatment facility. 

    Through extensive recycling, reuse and composting programs, the brewery is able to divert 99.8% of its solid waste from landfills. 

    Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. was named a “Green Power Partner” in 2011 by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and "Green Business of the Year" in 2010 by the EPA for its practices in sustainability.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    18 - 19 / Amber-Brown

    Original Gravity

    23.000 plato

    Final Gravity

    6.000 plato

    Hops

    Cascade +

    Flavor: Intense citrus, grapefruit and piney notes.

    Aroma: Spicy flowers and some grass.

    Alpha Acids: 4.5 - 7%                      

    Beta Acids: 4.5 - 7%                         

    Dual Purpose 

    Centennial +

    Flavor: Slightly more bitter than Cascade with some strong grapefruit notes and spicy tones.

    Aroma: Grapefruit and herbal notes.

    Alpha Acids: 9.5 - 11.5%     

    Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

    Dual Purpose

    Chinook +

    Flavor: Harsh bitterness with and emphasis on spice and earthiness

    Aroma: Spicy with some pine and smokiness

    Alpha Acids: 12 - 14%         

    Beta Acids: 3 - 4%                            

    Bittering

    Malt Variety

  • J.W. Lee's 2013 Harvest Ale Lagavulin
  • J.W. Lee's 2013 Harvest Ale Lagavulin

    Style

    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    Category

    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    11.50

    J.W. Lee's 2013 Harvest Ale Lagavulin

    sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates, and peat

    sweet caramel, vanilla, raisins, dates, and peat

    read less

    Style:
    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    Brewery:
    J.W. Lee's

    Greengate Brewery
    Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

    http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

    read more

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

    Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    275mL

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Cascade Brewing 2015 Cranberry
  • Cascade Brewing 2015 Cranberry

    Style

    Wild Ale

    Category

    Wild Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    8.00

    Cascade Brewing 2015 Cranberry

    Cranberries, Orange Peel and Cinnamon

    Cranberries, Orange Peel and Cinnamon

    read less

    Style:
    Wild Ale

    Brewery:
    Cascade Brewing

    7424 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy
    Portland, OR 97225

    http://cascadebrewing.com/

    Cascade Brewing was founded in 1998 by owner Art Larrance and brewmaster Ron Gansberg. Together, Art and Ron put their 40 years combined beer experience to work, designing and installing Cascade’s 10-barrel brewing system in Southwest Portland, then creating and distributing well-balanced traditional ales ...

    read more

    Cascade Brewing was founded in 1998 by owner Art Larrance and brewmaster Ron Gansberg. Together, Art and Ron put their 40 years combined beer experience to work, designing and installing Cascade’s 10-barrel brewing system in Southwest Portland, then creating and distributing well-balanced traditional ales.

    Sour beers really came about by default. The pair had followed the trends of traditional ales and were growing tired of what they referred to as the “hops arms race” of ever-hoppier beers, especially in the Northwest. Both wanted to focus instead on beers that offered an intense sensory experience other than hops. They considered what they could draw upon from the region: an abundant supply of wine barrels from the nearby wine country, and access to delicious and plentiful local fruit.

    They chose to create sour ales (though they purposefully stayed away from trying to recreate Belgian style sour ales). Employing lactobacillus, an acid bacteria that produces moderate levels of acidity and sour flavors, they began their sour journey in 2005. By 2006, they were producing the base beer that would then be aged for up to a year in wine, port and whiskey oak barrels.

    In 2008, the brewery developed three ultra-premium, oak barrel-aged, lactic-fermented Northwest sour ales: Kriek, Apricot and Cuvee du Jongleur. Each was hand-bottled in 750 ml champagne bottles with a cork and wire basket. That fall, Cascade entered all three into the Great American Beer Festival in the Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer category: a total of 22 beers were entered in the class, and Cascade Kriek took the Bronze.

    In 2009, they brought in 4,500 lbs. of Bing and sour pie cherries straight from the orchards for making Kriek, Sang Royale and Sang Noir. They picked up 2,500 lbs. of apricots for their Apricot Ale, one ton of Cabernet Sauvignon grapes for a yet to be named beer (going through extensive aging) and 2,500 lbs. of white wine grapes for The Vine. That fall, they again traveled to the Great American Beer Festival, submitting three of their beers in the Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer category. Out of 45 entries, Cascade Brewing was awarded the Gold for Bourbonic Plague and the Silver for Vlad the Imp Aler. These wins propelled the obscure brewery into the forefront nationally for Northwest sour ales.

    In September 2010, Cascade opened the Cascade Brewing Barrel House, the nation’s first “House of Sour,” at 939 SE Belmont Street in Portland. Located in a 7,000 square foot former produce warehouse, the Barrel House contained a 5,000 square foot production side with a loading dock, barrel room, cooler and workspace; as well as a 2,100 square foot tasting room with seating for 90 inside and another 80 out front.

    In 2014, the production side of the Barrel House was bursting at the seams and needed to relocate. Cascade leased a 23,000-square-foot warehouse in Southwest Portland that headquarters all of its blending, aging, packaging and distribution. The Cascade Blending House currently holds more than 1,500 barrels filled with its sour beer, plus an additional nine foudres (giant wooden barrels that typically hold around 1,800 gallons of beer). All of its beers continue to be brewed at the original brewery at 7424 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy in Portland.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    750mL

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • J.W. Lee's 2015 Tequila Barrel Aged Harvest Ale
  • J.W. Lee's 2015 Tequila Barrel Aged Harvest Ale

    Style

    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    Category

    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    11.50

    J.W. Lee's 2015 Tequila Barrel Aged Harvest Ale

    This fully fermented ale has been brewed by JW Lees as a celebration of the brewers' art. Harvest Ale can be enjoyed now or laid down like a fine wine for enjoyment to come." Commercial Description

    This fully fermented ale has been brewed by JW Lees as a celebration of the brewers' art. Harvest Ale can be enjoyed now or laid down like a fine wine for enjoyment to come." Commercial Description

    read less

    Style:
    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    Brewery:
    J.W. Lee's

    Greengate Brewery
    Middleton Junction, England M24 2AX

    http://www.jwlees.co.uk/

    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a ...

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    JW Lees is a family brewery company which was founded in 1828. We are based in Middleton in North Manchester and own JW Lees Brewery, JW Lees Pubs, The Alderley Edge Hotel, The Trearddur Bay Hotel and Willoughby’s Wine Merchants. JW Lees is a sixth-generation family business which employs just over 1,000 people, 140 at the brewery and site in Middleton Junction in North Manchester and 865 in its 36 managed pubs, inns and hotels, as well as letting a further 105 tied pubs to self-employed tenants.

    Cask beer is at the heart of JW Lees and we brew six cask ales as well as three lagers, three smooth beers and eight limited edition seasonal cask ales which are available throughout at different times of the year. We also have the sole UK distribution rights for Bohemia Regent Premium Lager from the Czech Republic. Willoughby’s is our wines and spirits company and we stock over 500 wines from all over the world.

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales 2016 Clementina
  • Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales 2016 Clementina

    Style

    Saison

    Category

    Saison

    IBU

    11

    ABV

    5.50

    Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales 2016 Clementina

    A bright and highly effervescent oak aged golden saison. Brewed with citrus peel, pink Himalayan salt, coriander and clementine juice. Citrus and bready wheat in the aroma, tart and refreshing with notes of citrus in the finish.

    A bright and highly effervescent oak aged golden saison. Brewed with citrus peel, pink Himalayan salt, coriander and clementine juice. Citrus and bready wheat in the aroma, tart and refreshing with notes of citrus in the finish.

    read less

    Style:
    Saison

    Brewery:
    Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales

    311 S. Main St.
    Ann Arbor, MI 48104

    http://www.jollypumpkin.com/jp/home

    Ron Jeffries founded Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in 2004 in Dexter, Michigan. It operates two pubs, one in Ann Arbor and the other in Traverse City. Jolly Pumpkin produces a variety of unfiltered and unpasteurized "rustic country" beers.

    Jolly Pumpkin ages their beers in wine ...

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    Ron Jeffries founded Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in 2004 in Dexter, Michigan. It operates two pubs, one in Ann Arbor and the other in Traverse City. Jolly Pumpkin produces a variety of unfiltered and unpasteurized "rustic country" beers.

    Jolly Pumpkin ages their beers in wine barrels, which contain naturally occurring microbiological cultures including brettanomyces. These cultures produce a complex flavor profile in their beers, which includes flavors described as leathery, earthy, wild, funky, or even "sweaty horse hair character,” which may approximate how beer tasted before the advent of pasteurization and industrialization. This style of beer has been described as "farmhouse ale" or American Wild Ale. Jolly Pumpkin was not the first brewery in the U.S. to start brewing these styles, but it is one of the most well known.

    Their year-round productions include Oro de Calabaza, La Roja, Calabaza Blanca, Bam Biere, and Bam Noire.  Their seasonal beers include Madrugada Obscura “Dark Dawn”, Biere de Mars, E.S. Bam, Luciernaga “The Firefly” Weizen Bam Miere, La Parcela, Fuego del Otono, Noel de Calabaza, Marcaibo Especial, and Perseguidor.

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    Glassware

    Tulip

    Bottle Size

    750mL

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2016 Sucaba
  • Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2016 Sucaba

    Style

    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    Category

    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    IBU

    31

    ABV

    12.50

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2016 Sucaba

    After taking a year off, Sucaba returns for a curtain call in 2018. As always, this latest vintage delivers big, boozy bourbon and American oak aromas combine with soft chocolate malt undertones. Complex malt flavors are framed in oak with hints of dark chocolate, vanilla ...

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    After taking a year off, Sucaba returns for a curtain call in 2018. As always, this latest vintage delivers big, boozy bourbon and American oak aromas combine with soft chocolate malt undertones. Complex malt flavors are framed in oak with hints of dark chocolate, vanilla, toasted coconut and a touch of dark cherry. Sucaba is a one-of-a-kind sipping experience.  It is a beer built to last, and one that will reward careful cellaring for years to come. We highly recommend counting the years with an abacus.

    read less

    Style:
    Barrel Aged Barleywine

    Brewery:
    Firestone Walker Brewing Company

    1400 Ramada Dr
    Paso Robles , CA 93446

    http://www.firestonebeer.com/

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

    Firestone ...

    read more

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

    Firestone Walker’s ales are selectively fermented in the Firestone Union oak barrel brewing system. The Firestone Union incorporates 65-gallon, medium and heavy toast American oak barrels.

    Firestone Walker takes pride in making exceptional pale ales. More recently, they created a seasonal series offering, as well as their Proprietor’s Reserve series of beers, born from their Anniversary program. These vintage and limited release beers are the consummate sipping beers, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family. 

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company continues to grow as the palates of Americans migrate to craft beer. Their brew staff has picked up “Mid Size Brewery of the Year” at the World Beer Cup an unmatched four times.

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    22oz

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2017 Parabola
  • Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2017 Parabola

    Style

    Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

    Category

    Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

    IBU

    69

    ABV

    12.70

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company 2017 Parabola

    Parabola is a beer of darkness and immensity, a barrel-­aged beast that is routinely ranked as one of the top beers in the world.  This Russian imperial oatmeal stout is aged for a full year in  Heaven Hill barrels, developing flavors of rich, chewy ...

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    Parabola is a beer of darkness and immensity, a barrel-­aged beast that is routinely ranked as one of the top beers in the world.  This Russian imperial oatmeal stout is aged for a full year in  Heaven Hill barrels, developing flavors of rich, chewy roasted malts, charred oak and bourbony vanilla. Parabola bares its teeth with its impenetrable black hue and soaring alcohol, yet its bite remains refined with a silky, balanced finish.   

    read less

    Style:
    Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

    Brewery:
    Firestone Walker Brewing Company

    1400 Ramada Dr
    Paso Robles , CA 93446

    http://www.firestonebeer.com/

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

    Firestone ...

    read more

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

    Firestone Walker’s ales are selectively fermented in the Firestone Union oak barrel brewing system. The Firestone Union incorporates 65-gallon, medium and heavy toast American oak barrels.

    Firestone Walker takes pride in making exceptional pale ales. More recently, they created a seasonal series offering, as well as their Proprietor’s Reserve series of beers, born from their Anniversary program. These vintage and limited release beers are the consummate sipping beers, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family. 

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company continues to grow as the palates of Americans migrate to craft beer. Their brew staff has picked up “Mid Size Brewery of the Year” at the World Beer Cup an unmatched four times.

    read less

    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    12oz

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) √225 Saison
  • BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) √225 Saison

    Style

    Farmhouse Saison

    Category

    Farmhouse Saison

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    5.00

    BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) √225 Saison

    "Brewed for BFM's 15th Anniversary! Belgian style saison matured in third use Abbaye de Saint Bon Chien barrels for 4 months."  Commercial Desription

    "Brewed for BFM's 15th Anniversary! Belgian style saison matured in third use Abbaye de Saint Bon Chien barrels for 4 months."  Commercial Desription

    read less

    Style:
    Farmhouse Saison

    Brewery:
    BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes)

    Ch. des Buissons 8
    Saignelégier, CH-2350

    http://www.brasseriebfm.ch/en/

    Jérôme Rebetez concocted the first batches of beer in his parents’ kitchen. Enthusiastic about his results, he decided to present some of his creations at the “Swiss Homebrewing Trophy” contest. Apparently, he wasn’t the only one who enjoyed his brews; the judges ...

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    Jérôme Rebetez concocted the first batches of beer in his parents’ kitchen. Enthusiastic about his results, he decided to present some of his creations at the “Swiss Homebrewing Trophy” contest. Apparently, he wasn’t the only one who enjoyed his brews; the judges at the contest awarded Jérôme the first place.

    At 23, with a bachelor in enology, Jérôme Rebetez aspired to open up a brewery in his home region of Franches Montagnes. Full of passion but without any cash, Jérôme Rebetez decided to create beers with atypical character. He won the televised competition "Le rêve de vos 20 ans," which allowed him to establish La Brasserie des Franches-Montagnes in Saignelégier, Jura, with the obtained cash. With its spirited image, BFM was positioned as a pioneer in Swiss artisan brewing, crafting finesse beers that are complex with a great corps.

    Jérôme Rebetez uses ingredients chosen to guarantee the highest quality. They are always original and sometimes tricky to mix like Sarawak pepper, sage or other spices. He built a reputation for crafting rich beers with complex bouquets, remarkable tastes and long finishes. 

    L’Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien, a BFM specialty that matures in oak barrels for 12 months, was mentioned in The New York Times as the one of the best barley wines in the world.

    read less

    Glassware

    Sour

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    3 - 3 / Straw

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Firestone Walker Brewing Company 805
  • Firestone Walker Brewing Company 805

    Style

    American Blonde Ale

    Category

    American Blonde Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    4.70

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company 805

    "A light, refreshing blonde ale crafted for the California lifestyle. Subtle malt sweetness is balanced by a touch of hops, creating a versatile beer with a clean finish." Commercial Description

    "A light, refreshing blonde ale crafted for the California lifestyle. Subtle malt sweetness is balanced by a touch of hops, creating a versatile beer with a clean finish." Commercial Description

    read less

    Style:
    American Blonde Ale

    American Blonde Ale

    Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

    Appearance
    The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
    Aroma/Flavor
    Blonde Ales have ...
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    American Blonde Ale

    Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

    Appearance
    The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
    Aroma/Flavor
    Blonde Ales have a light to moderate sweet malty aroma with low to moderate fruitiness.
    The flavor has an initial malty sweetness but optionally some bready, toasty or biscuit-like flavor. With a light to moderate hop flavor and low to medium bitterness, the finish is medium-dry to somewhat sweet. The mouthfeel is medium light to medium body with medium to high carbonation.

    Ingredients
     Usually, Blonde Ales use 100% malted barley, but sometimes as much as 25% wheat malt can be used. This beer can also be hopped with any hop. 

    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve Blonde Ale in an American Pint, and it's stored in our lager cooler at 35°. 

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 3.5%-5.5% and an average IBU range of 15-28.
    Examples
    Great craft examples of this style are Southern Star Bombshell Blonde Ale and Real Ale Fireman’s #4.

    History
    Blonde Ale is a modern American take on the old American cream style ale style, which were brewed by ale breweries to compete against larger producers in pre-Prohibition Northeast and Mid-Atlanta America.  Cream ales were not 100% malted barley, but contained a percentage of corn.  Blonde Ales are also called Golden Ales, but should not be confused with Belgian-Style Golden Ales.
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    Brewery:
    Firestone Walker Brewing Company

    1400 Ramada Dr
    Paso Robles , CA 93446

    http://www.firestonebeer.com/

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

    Firestone ...

    read more

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company brewed its first beer in 1996 in a small facility rented from the Firestone Vineyard estate in Santa Barbara County.  In 2001, owners (and brothers-in-law) Adam Firestone and David Walker purchased the SLO Brewing Company located in Paso Robles, CA.

    Firestone Walker’s ales are selectively fermented in the Firestone Union oak barrel brewing system. The Firestone Union incorporates 65-gallon, medium and heavy toast American oak barrels.

    Firestone Walker takes pride in making exceptional pale ales. More recently, they created a seasonal series offering, as well as their Proprietor’s Reserve series of beers, born from their Anniversary program. These vintage and limited release beers are the consummate sipping beers, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family. 

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company continues to grow as the palates of Americans migrate to craft beer. Their brew staff has picked up “Mid Size Brewery of the Year” at the World Beer Cup an unmatched four times.

    read less

    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Legal Draft Beer Company Accused Amber
  • Legal Draft Beer Company Accused Amber

    Style

    Vienna Lager (Amber Lager)

    Category

    Vienna Lager (Amber Lager)

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    5.50

    Legal Draft Beer Company Accused Amber

    Clean and crystal clear. Malty sweetness and mild hop flavor. Easy drinking

    Clean and crystal clear. Malty sweetness and mild hop flavor. Easy drinking

    read less

    Style:
    Vienna Lager (Amber Lager)

    Vienna Lager is a classic German lager. It was very common in the years after its first release in 1840, but it has become somewhat rare.

    Appearance 
    The lager should be light reddish amber to copper color with bright clarity and a large off-white, persistent ...

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    Vienna Lager is a classic German lager. It was very common in the years after its first release in 1840, but it has become somewhat rare.

    Appearance 
    The lager should be light reddish amber to copper color with bright clarity and a large off-white, persistent head.

    Aroma/Flavor
    The beer should have a moderately rich German malt aroma (of Vienna and/or Munich malt). It has clean lager character, with no fruity esters or diacetyl. Noble hop aroma may be low to none.

    On the palate, soft, elegant malt complexity is in the forefront, with a firm enough hop bitterness to provide a balanced finish. There is toasted character from the use of Vienna malt, but no roasted or caramel flavor. The finish is fairly dry, with both malt and hop bitterness present in the aftertaste.

    Ingredients 
    As with Oktoberfests, only the finest quality malt should be used, along with Continental hops (preferably Noble varieties). It’s made with moderately hard, carbonate-rich water. Some caramel malts and/or darker malts may be used to add color and sweetness, but caramel malts shouldn’t add significant aroma and flavor and dark malts shouldn’t provide any roasted character. 

    Glassware and Serving Temperature 
    At Hay Merchant, this style of beer is served in an 16oz American Pint. We store and serve the beer from our lager cooler at 35° F.

    Stats
    Vienna ranges in the high 20s (IBU). Vienna Lagers are also lightly darker then the similar Märzen (11-14 SRM compared to 9-13 SRM, but noticeable lighter then than dark lagers of the time (40 SRM). 

    History 
    Vienna lagers and Märzen are very closely related. Both beers were brought to the market in 1841, one year before Pilsner made it appearance. The two brewers that invented the styles (Vienna lagers and Märzen) were close friends and helped each other develop the two different styles. Vienna Lager was developed by Anton Dreher. who owned the Schwechat Brewery near Vienna. Märzen was developed by Gabriel Sedlmayr.

    Prior to the development of Vienna lagers, Märzen and Pilsner in the early 1840s all German lagers were a shade of dark brown, due to the malts brewers were using. Prior to 1840, all German malts were dried using a direct fire method. This technique used open flame to heat the stone floor of the malt kiln. The resulting malts were unevenly roasted. Some kernels were very dark, while others were light. Some kernels were very dry, and others still had fairly high moisture content.

    In the early 1800s, the British developed a way to dry malts using an indirect method. By using heated air instead of direct flame, the malt could be completely dried without burning or even darkening. The result was pale malt. The British used pale malt to start brewing beers like Pale Ale.

    In 1833, Dreher and Sedlmayr went on a fact-finding mission to the United Kingdom. Some people would call the trip an exercise in industrial espionage; others would call it smart business. Call it what you may, but upon their return to their respective breweries, they quickly adopted the British method of malt drying.

    Using these new methods, Dreher released a completely new beer: Vienna Lager, which had medium body and full malty flavor (typical Central Eurpean).  Vienna finishes much dryer then Märzen with a higher level of bitterness up front. 

    The unique blend of British influence and German flavor led to the invention of a new beer style and a new type of malt. While Vienna Lager is rare today, Vienna malt is still widely used.

    Strangely enough, Vienna Lagers are most commonly found in Mexico. This might have to do with the very brief period from 1864-1867 that Archduke Ferdinand Maximillian Joseph ruled Mexico as Maximilian I, Emperor of Mexico. Unfortunately, high quality examples of this style no longer exist even in Mexico due to the industrial scaled production methods employed. 

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    Brewery:
    Legal Draft Beer Company

    500 E Division st
    Arlington, TX 76011

    http://www.legaldraftbeer.com/

    We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and ...

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    We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and are meant to stand up with the best beers in our state, our nation, and the world. We hope you’ll enjoy them with your family and friends in our taproom and beer garden, or at your favorite watering hole.

    read less

    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Saint Arnold Brewing Company Art Car IPA
  • Saint Arnold Brewing Company Art Car IPA

    Style

    IPA

    Category

    IPA

    IBU

    55

    ABV

    7.20

    Saint Arnold Brewing Company Art Car IPA

    "National IPA Day seems like the perfect time to release our newest beer, Art Car IPA, a very hoppy American IPA featuring a blend of both new and old hop varieties from the Pacific Northwest. We love this beer.

    The nose is a blend of ...

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    "National IPA Day seems like the perfect time to release our newest beer, Art Car IPA, a very hoppy American IPA featuring a blend of both new and old hop varieties from the Pacific Northwest. We love this beer.

    The nose is a blend of apricot and tropical fruit and mango. The taste starts with a big bitter blood orange that morphs into mangos and sweet tropical fruits. There is a lightly sweet malt body that allows the hops to shine while there being a nice complexity to the flavors.

    The Art Car IPA name was inspired by the fleet of hand painted Art Cars created by local artists for Saint Arnold. You've probably seen our salespeople driving them around town. The label artwork was designed by renowned Houston graffiti artist and our good friend, GONZO247, who has painted four Saint Arnold Art Cars. If you've been to the brewery, you've seen his murals on the inside and outside of our building." Commercial Description

    read less

    Style:
    IPA

    IPA (India Pale Ale) 
    Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
    About Pale Ales
    Pale Ale is a large category ...
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    IPA (India Pale Ale) 
    Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
    About Pale Ales
    Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

    Appearance
    The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

    Aroma/Taste
    A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
    The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
    Ingredients
    IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
    Examples
    Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

    History 
    The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
    Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
    It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
    American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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    Brewery:
    Saint Arnold Brewing Company

    2000 Lyons Avenue
    Houston, TX 77020

    http://www.saintarnold.com/

    The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have ...

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    The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have attracted a large following. Saint Arnold has won numerous national and international awards.

    Saint Arnold was originally located on the far northwest side of Houston and operated out of that location for more than fifteen years. In 2009, Saint Arnold purchased a three-story 104,000-square-foot brick building—constructed in 1914 and most recently used as a food service facility for the Houston Independent School District—north of Downtown Houston. The maximum capacity of the new brewery is over 100,000 barrels, compared to 26,000 barrels at the previous location. As of 2015 the brewery is brewing just under 60,000 barrels a year. A large percentage of the brewery’s production capacity is taken up by beer brewed under contract for BJ’s Brewhouse.

    Saint Arnold is known for a core lineup, including Lawnmower, a light bodied German Style Kolsch, as well as a traditional American Style IPA, Elissa. In recent years, Saint Arnold has began to step out of the traditional mold it has followed for years. In 2013, they launched two new lines of beers: Icon is a series of more unique beers released four times a year, and Bishop’s Barrel, a special release series sold only in the bottle available only to bars and restaurants. While coming late to the barrel aging game, the Bishop’s Barrel series has been a hit with fans. In the summer of 2014, Saint Arnold released a Berliner Weisse. Very popular with craft beer fans, the slightly sour German style is an extreme and surprising beer for the generally conservative brewery.

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    4 - 5 / Pale Gold

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Bavik Pilsner
  • Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Bavik Pilsner

    Style

    German Style Pilsner

    Category

    German Style Pilsner

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    5.20

    Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Bavik Pilsner

    "Bavik Premium Pils has already many awards on its list of achievements. This can be entirely attributed to its traditional brewing process whereby only aroma hops are being used, a long and cold maturation process and where pasteurization is out of the question." Commercial Description

    "Bavik Premium Pils has already many awards on its list of achievements. This can be entirely attributed to its traditional brewing process whereby only aroma hops are being used, a long and cold maturation process and where pasteurization is out of the question." Commercial Description

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    Style:
    German Style Pilsner

    Note: Sometimes the name for a style of beer refers to a region or country of origin and can legally describe beers brewed only in that area. At Hay Merchant, we believe names are important in describing a beer and help consumers make educated choices ...

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    Note: Sometimes the name for a style of beer refers to a region or country of origin and can legally describe beers brewed only in that area. At Hay Merchant, we believe names are important in describing a beer and help consumers make educated choices. That’s why we categorize beers in literal terms and reference the style, even if they weren’t brewed in a specified region. In order to help add clarity, we will use the word “Style” in the style name to make this distinction. For instance, beers brewed in the style of German Pilsner but not brewed in Germany will be called German Style Pilsner as opposed to German Pilsner.

    Pilsner is the dominant beer style in the world today.  All 3 Pilsner sub styles—Czech (Bohemian), German and International—share the same basic flavor profile and the same root history, but German Pilsners are better attenuated and drier then their Czech cousins, showing off more hop bitterness. 


    Appearance
    Pilsners should be pale straw to golden, and very clear with a frothy, clean white head. Pilsners should look clean, and German Pilsner will be slightly lighter in color then the Czech style. 

    Aroma/Flavor
    Crispness is the most universal flavor profile for this style. Water type plays a huge role in taste. Pilsners have light malt aromas, a backbone of graininess and a grassy noble hop note. German Pilsners are more earthy and bitter in both aroma and flavor because they use Saaz hops in addition to other European Noble hops, whereas Czech Pilsner uses only Saaz hops.

    There are two types of German Pilsner, distinguished by the difference in the water of Northern and Southern Germany. The water in the North is fairly hard, which accentuates bitterness and creates a very hoppy beer—strong, zesty, in-your-face hop bitterness. In Southern Germany, where you will find extremely soft water, the bitterness is suppressed, resulting in more of a mellow hop.

    Ingredients
    The most common ingredients for this style are 2-row Pilsner malts and German low Alpha hops. 

    Glassware/Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, you will most often find Pilsners served in the 20oz Pilsner glass and stored in our lager cooler at 35° F.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of  4.5%-6% (American Pilsners trending toward the higher percentage). This style will have an average IBU range of 25-45 (German Pils trending toward the higher IBU).

    History
    The story of the Czech Pilsner is really a story about the blending of technology and raw ingredients. The Czech Pilsner was created as a result of the technological revolution that occurred in Germany in the mid-19th century. The style was possible due to advances in refrigeration, transportation, steam and microbiology.

    The style originated in the town of Plzen, Czechoslovakia around 1840. The Czech-speaking lands of Bohemia were home to two very important ingredients: very good quality 2-row barley and Saaz hops. For centuries, the Grand Dukes of Bohemia attempted to control the supply of these hops by imposing the death penalty on anyone caught smuggling the Saaz hop rhizomes (root cuttings) out of the region.  

    In 1838, an entire season’s worth of beer was poured out in the town square because it was of low quality. The Czechs have always taken their beer very seriously and had little acceptance for bad beer. As a result of this bad batch of beer, in 1840, the town of Plzen voted to build a new brewery that utilized the pressurized steam to heat the brew kettles.

    In 1842, Josef Groll was hired to be the brewmaster for this new state-of-the-art brewery. Groll was the son of a Bavarian brewer from just outside Munich. When he got to Pilzen, he borrowed heavily from Bavarian brewers and hired Bavarian assistants and Bavarian barrel makers. He even brought a Bavarian yeast strain with him.  For all his talent as a brewer, Groll was not a well-liked man. His own father called him “the rudest man in Bavaria.” It might have been for his inability to work with other people that led to his contract not being renewed when it expired in 1845. However, in his short tenure in Pilzen, he helped birth the Bohemia and the lager. 

    Summary
    In summary, the German Pilsner is slightly lighter in color than other Pilsner styles and are more earthy and hitter in aroma and flavor, due to its use of Saaz and other European Boble hops. Water distinguishes the two types of German Pilsner: hard water in Northern Germany accentuates bitterness and creates a very hoppy beer, which the soft water in the South suppresses the bitterness. 

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    Brewery:
    Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik)

    Rijksweg(B) 33
    Bavikhove, 8531

    http://www.brouwerijdebrabandere.be/home-en

    The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other ...

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    The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other family members took control of the brewery, changed the name back to Brabandere Brewery and began to open a large number of cafés and pubs. Bradandere expanded its own market base by making the brewery the sole supplier of product to those cafés.

    In 1990, the family split the operations of the cafés and the brewery. The brewery was renamed again, this time taking inspiration from the town that had been home to the brewery for almost 100 years—Bavik. Over the next decade, the brewery made some large investments into the brewery itself, modernizing the brewery and expanding capacity, making it one of the largest family-owned breweries in Belgium.

    In 2013, the fifth generation of the Brabandere family took over. The decision was made to once again use the family name, and thus the Brabandere Brewery was revived.

    In Belgium, beers are traditionally known by their stand alone brand names and not by the brewery name. Brabandere brews  three main brands: Bavik, Wittekerke and Petrus. Bavik is best known for the Pilsner, a light, refreshing, slightly hopped bohemian rendition of the style. Wittekerke is the brand used to sell wheat beers. Petrus is the moniker that adorns the “special” beers—usually higher in alcohol or anything different from the core brand of that particular brewery, not always referring to the same style of beer. The most notable beer from the Petrus line is the Aged Pale: 100 percent pale malts, dry hopped and aged for at least 18 months in large wooden fermenters. This beer is light in body but aggressively sour in taste—a Hay Merchant favorite.

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    Glassware

    Pilsner

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    1 - 2 / Pale Straw

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Odell Brewing Company Brett Barrel Aged Golden Ale
  • Odell Brewing Company Brett Barrel Aged Golden Ale

    Style

    Sour Ale

    Category

    Sour Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    7.50

    Odell Brewing Company Brett Barrel Aged Golden Ale

    A complex sour brett beer that is very unique in that it showcases a wild yeast, clean lactic tartness, and complex wood characters. 

    A complex sour brett beer that is very unique in that it showcases a wild yeast, clean lactic tartness, and complex wood characters. 

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    Style:
    Sour Ale

    Brewery:
    Odell Brewing Company

    800 East Lincoln Avenue
    Fort Collins, CO 80524

    http://odellbrewing.com/

    Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create ...

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    Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create quality, hand-crafted, innovative brews.

    In 2009, having outgrown every inch and aspect of their previous brewery, Odell doubled its plant size to 45,000 square feet and its beer sold to 45,000 barrels—one barrel per square foot! 

    As a regional craft brewery, Odell Brewing is committed to serving the communities in which it distributes by sourcing local raw materials, and through its charitable giving program known as Odell Outreach. Odell Brewing is an award winning brewery, nationally and internationally. 

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    Glassware

    Sour

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Hanssens Artisanaal Cassis
  • Hanssens Artisanaal Cassis

    Style

    Lambic

    Category

    Lambic

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    6.00

    Hanssens Artisanaal Cassis

    Ale Brewed with Black Currants and Matured in Oak Barrels.

    Ale Brewed with Black Currants and Matured in Oak Barrels.

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    Style:
    Lambic

    Brewery:
    Hanssens Artisanaal

    Vroenenbosstraat 15
    Dworp, Belgium 1653

    Hanssens Artisanaal is the oldest independent geuze blender in the whole world. At Hanssens, no beer is actually brewed! Instead, they pursue a profession that was very important in the history of lambic style beers, they are solely blenders of beer.

    Lambic beers are famous ...

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    Hanssens Artisanaal is the oldest independent geuze blender in the whole world. At Hanssens, no beer is actually brewed! Instead, they pursue a profession that was very important in the history of lambic style beers, they are solely blenders of beer.

    Lambic beers are famous for being "wild fermented". Instead of adding a special yeast strain to cause fermentation, some brewers in the Senne river valley leave the warm, sweet, unfermented beer (called wort) open to the elements. Wild strains of yeast and other micro organisms will then seed the liquid. Normally when brewing beer, a brewers yeast will be used to turn sugar into alcohol and certain flavor elements of the beer. In these wild beers, yeast and others will turn sugar into alcohol, acid, and a huge variety of flavor chemicals. 

    Since each batch is different, the beer has to be blended with multiple batches to create a consistent product. Most lambics are created from a mixture of aged sour beer and young, sweeter beer. They are then barrel aged to combine the flavors.

    Hanssens takes this a step further, and actually blends batches from different breweries in their area. This used to be a very common practice, but Hanssens is now the oldest remaining blender. They bring to this endeavor a variety of barrels, some up to one hundred years old, and a passion and a love for the tradition of Geuze and Lambics. They will also add whole fruits to some of their beers, to make even more flavorful blends.

    Hanssens Bartholomeus, former major of Dworp, started to brew lambic in 1871, in the previous Sint-Antonius brewery. Documents have proven that he continued to brew, from 1896 onwards, in buildings located in the Vroenenbosstraat, Dworp. These premises are still used. 

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    375mL

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Hahn Family Wines Chardonnay
  • Hahn Family Wines Chardonnay

    Style

    Wine

    Category

    Wine

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    14.50

    Hahn Family Wines Chardonnay

    Tropical aromas of banana, lemongrass, and citrus with subtle notes of vanilla and toasty oak. Bright acidity welcomes the palate, leading to a perfect balance of tropical fruit and baking spices that culminate in a lingering, clean finish.

    Tropical aromas of banana, lemongrass, and citrus with subtle notes of vanilla and toasty oak. Bright acidity welcomes the palate, leading to a perfect balance of tropical fruit and baking spices that culminate in a lingering, clean finish.

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    Style:
    Wine

    Brewery:
    Hahn Family Wines

    37700 Foothill Road
    Soledad, CA 93960

    https://www.hahnwines.com/

    During the 1790s, Spanish missionaries recognized the rare soils and favorable climate of the Santa Lucia Highlands of Monterey and planted grapevines there. Yet nearly two hundred years later when our founder Nicolaus (Nicky) Hahn and his wife Gaby first purchased land in the Highlands ...

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    During the 1790s, Spanish missionaries recognized the rare soils and favorable climate of the Santa Lucia Highlands of Monterey and planted grapevines there. Yet nearly two hundred years later when our founder Nicolaus (Nicky) Hahn and his wife Gaby first purchased land in the Highlands, cattle, sheep and horses ranged over the hills. Vineyards were a secondary concern.

    Nicky immediately saw that the land he’d purchased was destined for greater things than grazing stock. He wasted no time. In 1980, the Hahns released their first wine from SLH. A mere eight years later, Nicky led the charge to establish SLH as an American Viticultural Area, a dream he saw realized in 1991.

    Today, Hahn Family Wines, now run by Nicky and Gaby’s son Philip, owns and sustainably farms 650 acres of estate vineyards in the Santa Lucia Highlands. SLH enjoys worldwide acclaim for the Pinot Noir and Chardonnay made there.

    TIMELINE

    2007

    Hahn launches Lucienne—single-vineyard Pinot Noirs from estate vineyards.

    2002

    Hahn open its visitor center and tasting room at its SLH winery.

    2001

    Hahn’s SLH vineyards replanted mostly to Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

    1992

    Hahn family purchases Lone Oak Vineyard in SLH.

    1991

    SLH designated an American Viticultural Area.

    1990

    Hahn family purchases Doctor’s Vineyard in SLH.

    1980

    Nicky Hahn releases his first vintage of wine.

    1979

    The Hahn family purchases the Smith and Hook vineyards in Santa Lucia Highlands.

    1936

    Los Padres National Forest is founded. This vast parkland includes Monterey’s Big Sur Coast along with scenic inland tracts.

    1908

    President Theodore Roosevelt establishes Pinnacles National Monument in the Gabilan Mountains, the range facing Santa Lucia Highlands.

    1810

    Mission padres tend a Salinas vineyard that has grown in size to 5,000 vines.

    1791

    California’s 13th mission is founded at the foot of the Santa Lucia Highlands.

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    Glassware

    Wine Glass

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Eureka Heights Brewing Company Demon Bag
  • Eureka Heights Brewing Company Demon Bag

    Style

    American Strong Ale

    Category

    American Strong Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    12.00

    Eureka Heights Brewing Company Demon Bag

    This Belgian strong ale spent eight glorious months resting in rye whiskey barrels along side a copious amount of sour cherries. The magnificent results have an estery spiciness that is balanced by a soft tartness from the cherries.A very strong and complex Belgian ale ...

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    This Belgian strong ale spent eight glorious months resting in rye whiskey barrels along side a copious amount of sour cherries. The magnificent results have an estery spiciness that is balanced by a soft tartness from the cherries.A very strong and complex Belgian ale full of dark fruit flavors.

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    Style:
    American Strong Ale

    Brewery:
    Eureka Heights Brewing Company

    941 W 18TH ST
    Houston, Texas 77008

    http://www.eurekaheights.com/

    New brewery in the Heights

    New brewery in the Heights

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Wasatch Brewery Devastator
  • Wasatch Brewery Devastator

    Style

    Doppelbock

    Category

    Doppelbock

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    8.00

    Wasatch Brewery Devastator

    "If you're going to sin,sin big. With 8% alc/vol and a creamy richness, this brew has developed a serious cult following. Imagine that" Commercial Description

    "If you're going to sin,sin big. With 8% alc/vol and a creamy richness, this brew has developed a serious cult following. Imagine that" Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Doppelbock

    Doppelbock
    Easily recognized by names ending in “-ator,” the Doppelbock is a dark beer with a very strong maltiness. This beer, created by monks in Munich, is not related to the similarly-named Bock style.

    Appearance
    The appearance ranges from a deep gold to dark brown ...
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    Doppelbock
    Easily recognized by names ending in “-ator,” the Doppelbock is a dark beer with a very strong maltiness. This beer, created by monks in Munich, is not related to the similarly-named Bock style.

    Appearance
    The appearance ranges from a deep gold to dark brown color with hints of ruby. A large, creamy, persistent head will vary in color depending on the version.

    Aroma/Flavor
    The aroma has a very strong maltiness, some with a light caramel flavor from a long boil.  A moderately low fruity aspect (prune, plum or grape) can be present. A slight chocolate flavor can be present in dark versions, while a moderate alcohol aroma may be present. 
    The flavor is very rich and malty.  A very slight chocolate flavor is optional in darker flavors. Some of the prune, plum, or grape fruitiness can be present. There will be an impression of alcoholic strength but will be smooth and warming. Most versions are fairly sweet with an impression of attenuation. The mouthfeel is a medium-full to full body. Moderate carbonation and very smooth.

    Ingredients
    Pils and Vienna malts are the most common ingredients for lighter versions, and Munich malts are used in darker ones. Noble hops are used in all versions. Water can vary from soft to hard. Decoction mashing and long boiling plays an important part of flavor development.

    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve Dopplebock in an American Pint, and it is stored in our lager cooler at 35°. 

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 7%-10% and an average IBU range of 16-26.
    Examples
    Great craft examples of this style are Paulaner Salvator and Wasatch Devastator.

    History
    Contrary to the name, Doppelbock is not historically related to Bock. The name bock is the result of the mispronunciation of the word Einbeck, the town where Bock was developed. Doppelbock was developed in Munich, the first specialty beer brewed by the St. Francis of Paula monks for their Lenten fast. Since they couldn’t eat anything for 46 days, they used the grain normally used to bake bread to brew a strong beer, which they felt cleansed the body and soul. The beer was called Salvator, or Savior, and was originally brewed only for the monks themselves. Eventually the brewery was able to sell the beer to the public. Historically, the beer was brewed to 4% ABV, but over the years the original gravity has not changed, but the final gravity has led to a beer that is dryer and higher in alcohol.  
    The term “doppel” or “double” was coined by Munich consumers who compared it to the Bock beers of Einbeck. The name Doppelbock found wide use by the 1850s. Many Doppelbocks have names that end in “-ator” in tribute to the prototypical Salvator. The word bock means Goat in German so it is common to see a goat or a ram on the label.
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    Brewery:
    Wasatch Brewery

    250 Main Street
    Park City, UT 84060

    https://www.wasatchbeers.com/

    When Greg Schirf moved to Utah from Milwaukee in the early '80s, drinking and brewing were all but forbidden. Greg took matters into his own hands and did what any self-respecting Midwesterner would do: He started a brewery. Wasatch was the very first brewery in ...

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    When Greg Schirf moved to Utah from Milwaukee in the early '80s, drinking and brewing were all but forbidden. Greg took matters into his own hands and did what any self-respecting Midwesterner would do: He started a brewery. Wasatch was the very first brewery in Utah – and one of the first craft brewers in all of the U.S. – brewing award-winning brews since 1986.

    In 1988, Greg Schirf proposed another bill to the Utah Legislature making brewpubs legal in Utah and opened the first brewpub at the top of historic Main Street in the resort town of Park City. Wasatch continues to misbehave, turning out naughty beer after naughty beer year after year.

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    20 - 23 / Brown

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • 11 Below Brewing Company Double Dry Hopped Trade Bait
  • 11 Below Brewing Company Double Dry Hopped Trade Bait

    Style

    IPA

    Category

    IPA

    IBU

    45

    ABV

    6.50

    11 Below Brewing Company Double Dry Hopped Trade Bait

    Not too bitter with a juicy, fruity finish

    Not too bitter with a juicy, fruity finish

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    Style:
    IPA

    IPA (India Pale Ale) 
    Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
    About Pale Ales
    Pale Ale is a large category ...
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    IPA (India Pale Ale) 
    Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
    About Pale Ales
    Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

    Appearance
    The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

    Aroma/Taste
    A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
    The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
    Ingredients
    IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
    Examples
    Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

    History 
    The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
    Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
    It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
    American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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    Brewery:
    11 Below Brewing Company

    6820 Bourgeois Rd
    Houston, TX 77066

    http://11belowbrewing.com/

    11 Below Brewing Co., a new brewery located in North Houston, was founded by three former oil industry professionals, Jeff Handojo, Bryce Baker and Brandon Moss. 

    The 10,000-square-foot, 30-barrel brewhouse officially opened in May 2015, with Keenan Zarling as head brewmaster. They launched with ...

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    11 Below Brewing Co., a new brewery located in North Houston, was founded by three former oil industry professionals, Jeff Handojo, Bryce Baker and Brandon Moss. 

    The 10,000-square-foot, 30-barrel brewhouse officially opened in May 2015, with Keenan Zarling as head brewmaster. They launched with three beers: 7-Iron, a hoppy session; Oso Bueno, an American Amber; and Color Blind, a Red IPA. 

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    Glassware

    Tulip

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Shacksbury Cider Dry Cider
  • Shacksbury Cider Dry Cider

    Style

    Cider

    Category

    Cider

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    6.50

    Shacksbury Cider Dry Cider

    • Apple varieties - Jonagold, Spartan, McIntosh, Empire, Ellis Bitters, Browns, Michelin, Somerset Redstreak, and Dabinett
      • Apples grown by Sunrise Orchards in Cornwall, Vermont and Dragon Orchards in Herefordshire, England
    • Apple varieties - Jonagold, Spartan, McIntosh, Empire, Ellis Bitters, Browns, Michelin, Somerset Redstreak, and Dabinett
      • Apples grown by Sunrise Orchards in Cornwall, Vermont and Dragon Orchards in Herefordshire, England
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    Style:
    Cider

    Brewery:
    Shacksbury Cider

    11 Main St
    Vergennes, VT 05491

    http://www.shacksbury.com/

    Far from ordinary, apples are the most diverse food plant on earth. Unfortunately, only a handful of varieties are cultivated at scale in America, and all of those are designed for eating, not cider making.

    At Shacksbury, we believe cider can, and should, be daring ...

    read more

    Far from ordinary, apples are the most diverse food plant on earth. Unfortunately, only a handful of varieties are cultivated at scale in America, and all of those are designed for eating, not cider making.

    At Shacksbury, we believe cider can, and should, be daring and complex. From gnarled trees on New England farmsteads to Old World orchards in England and Spain, our cider will change the way you think about this amazing fruit.

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    Glassware

    Tulip

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte Duchesse de Bourgogne
  • Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte Duchesse de Bourgogne

    Style

    Flanders Red Ale

    Category

    Flanders Red Ale

    IBU

    11

    ABV

    6.00

    Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte Duchesse de Bourgogne

    Duchesse de Bourgogne from Brouwerij Verhaeghe is the traditional Flemish red ale. This refreshing ale is matured in oak casks; smooth with a rich texture and interplay of passion fruit, and chocolate, and a long, dry and acidic finish. After the first and secondary fermentation ...

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    Duchesse de Bourgogne from Brouwerij Verhaeghe is the traditional Flemish red ale. This refreshing ale is matured in oak casks; smooth with a rich texture and interplay of passion fruit, and chocolate, and a long, dry and acidic finish. After the first and secondary fermentation, the beer goes for maturation into the oak barrels for 18 months. The final product is a blend of younger 8 months old beer with 18 months old beer. The average age of the Duchesse de Bourgogne before being bottled is 12 months.

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    Style:
    Flanders Red Ale

    Brewery:
    Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte

    Koning Albert I-laan 120
    Westtoer, Brugge B-8000

    https://www.brouwerijverhaeghe.be/

    The story of Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte started in 1885 when Paul Verhaeghe set up his brewery and malt works. Polkes’ (little Paul’s) barrel beer quickly Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte
    © BeerTourism.com
    gained a foothold in the Kortrijk (Courtrai) region.

    And soon the brewery was using the railways ...

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    The story of Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte started in 1885 when Paul Verhaeghe set up his brewery and malt works. Polkes’ (little Paul’s) barrel beer quickly Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte
    © BeerTourism.com
    gained a foothold in the Kortrijk (Courtrai) region.

    And soon the brewery was using the railways to transport its so-called ‘Blonde de Flandres’ as far as Brussels.

    As it did for so many other breweries, the First World War signalled a temporary disruption of the production process in Vichte.

    The occupiers dismantled the brewhall to get their hands on precious copper.

    New equipment was needed to restart production when the war ended.

    During the 1920s the first bottled beer was produced at Verhaeghe.

    The brewery managed to survive the Second World War by selling a table beer that was low in alcohol (0.8% ABV).

    After the war King Pils reigned everywhere but, in its home region, Brouwerij Verhaeghe bravely rowed against the tide. Though in time they did introduceight from the foeder...
    © BeerTourism.com
    Sultan Pils, named Vera Pils in later years.

    Genuine kriekenbiers like those produced by Brouwerij Verhaeghe-Vichte take their lineage from the tradition of sour Flemish red-brown beers.

    The brewery’s main focus today is to maintain the quality of its existing beers and to develop new brews.

    Much has happened throughout the years but they have never veered away from this mission.

    This family brewery is now owned by brothers , their family’s fourth generation of brewers. Karl is responsible for daily management while Peter is in charge of production.Beer galore...
    © BeerTourism.com

    Their flagship beer is Duchesse de Bourgogne, matured in oak barrels. Since 1976 this Vichte-based brewery has also been making Caves, the traditional city beer of Lier, which is commissioned by a local guild called the Heren Van Lier.

    Nowadays 80% of the entire annual production, amounting to around 1,100,000 litres, is destined for export, in particular to Canada, the USA, Russia, Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan.

    Besides Vichtenaar, Duchesse de Bourgogne and Echt Kriekenbier, all of them Flemish red-brown beers, the range includes Barbe and Cambrinus, both top-fermented beers, the Christmas beer Barbe Noël (‘Santa’s Beard’) and Verhaeghe Pils.

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    Glassware

    Sour

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Avery Brewing Company Expletus
  • Avery Brewing Company Expletus

    Style

    Wild Ale

    Category

    Wild Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    5.90

    Avery Brewing Company Expletus

    Sour ale aged in Tequila Barrels with Cherries. 

    Sour ale aged in Tequila Barrels with Cherries. 

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    Style:
    Wild Ale

    Brewery:
    Avery Brewing Company

    4910 Nautilus Ct
    Boulder, CO 80301

    http://averybrewing.com/

    In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the ...

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    In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the Avery Brewing Company in Boulder, Colorado and still acts as president and head brewer. 

    Like many of its older craft brew brethren, Avery started out very small. When it opened, the brewery utilized only a seven-barrel tank to ferment, leading to a very low volume of production. In the years since, the brewery has expanded significantly to encompass the entire block of warehouses where it’s located. Even after 21 years, Avery is still a relatively small operation with a limited national footprint.  We’re lucky Avery has been in the Texas market for many years.

    These days, Avery is best known for big, extreme beers, but that hasn’t always been the case. The original line-up consisted of an Amber Ale, a Brown and a Dry Stout. It wasn’t until 1995 that Avery released Avery IPA. In 1999, Avery released Hog Heaven, a beer that they still call American Barley Wine to this day, but in reality, Hog Heaven was one of the first Double IPAs in the world.

    It was around this time (late 1999 -2003) that Avery’s beer lineup became the heavy hitting powerhouse that it is today.  Reverend the Belgian Quad launched in 2000, Salvation the Belgium Golden in 2002, and in 2003, Czar the Russian Imperial Stout ascended to the throne and is one of Hay Merchant’s favorite Avery beers. Avery’s first experiments with barrel aging began in 2004, along with the release of the Maharaja, a 120 IBU 10.5% monster of an Imperial IPA.

    In recent years, Avery has become known for its sour barrel-aged beers. The first beer in the series, Barbant, was released and was limited to 694 cases. It was an ale pitched with Brett and aged for 9 months in Zinfandel barrels. Anvil Bar and Refuge (Hay Merchant’s sister cocktail bar) was one of the only bars in Texas to get a case of this very rare beer.  Over the last few years, Avery has released a few of these beers a year, and each one is different.

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    Glassware

    Bottle Size

    12oz

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Saint Arnold Brewing Company Fancy Lawnmower
  • Saint Arnold Brewing Company Fancy Lawnmower

    Style

    German Style Kolsch

    Category

    German Style Kolsch

    IBU

    20

    ABV

    4.90

    Saint Arnold Brewing Company Fancy Lawnmower

    "A true German-style Kölsch. Originally brewed in Cologne, this beer is crisp and refreshing, yet has a sweet malty body that is balanced by a complex, citrus hop character. Multiple additions of German Hallertauer hops are used to achieve this delicate flavor. We use ...

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    "A true German-style Kölsch. Originally brewed in Cologne, this beer is crisp and refreshing, yet has a sweet malty body that is balanced by a complex, citrus hop character. Multiple additions of German Hallertauer hops are used to achieve this delicate flavor. We use a special Kölsch yeast, an ale yeast that ferments at lager temperatures, to yield the slightly fruity, clean flavor of this beer. Fancy Lawnmower Beer is a world class brew yet light enough to be enjoyed by Texans after strenuous activities, like mowing the lawn." Commercial Description

    read less

    Style:
    German Style Kolsch

    Brewery:
    Saint Arnold Brewing Company

    2000 Lyons Avenue
    Houston, TX 77020

    http://www.saintarnold.com/

    The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have ...

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    The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have attracted a large following. Saint Arnold has won numerous national and international awards.

    Saint Arnold was originally located on the far northwest side of Houston and operated out of that location for more than fifteen years. In 2009, Saint Arnold purchased a three-story 104,000-square-foot brick building—constructed in 1914 and most recently used as a food service facility for the Houston Independent School District—north of Downtown Houston. The maximum capacity of the new brewery is over 100,000 barrels, compared to 26,000 barrels at the previous location. As of 2015 the brewery is brewing just under 60,000 barrels a year. A large percentage of the brewery’s production capacity is taken up by beer brewed under contract for BJ’s Brewhouse.

    Saint Arnold is known for a core lineup, including Lawnmower, a light bodied German Style Kolsch, as well as a traditional American Style IPA, Elissa. In recent years, Saint Arnold has began to step out of the traditional mold it has followed for years. In 2013, they launched two new lines of beers: Icon is a series of more unique beers released four times a year, and Bishop’s Barrel, a special release series sold only in the bottle available only to bars and restaurants. While coming late to the barrel aging game, the Bishop’s Barrel series has been a hit with fans. In the summer of 2014, Saint Arnold released a Berliner Weisse. Very popular with craft beer fans, the slightly sour German style is an extreme and surprising beer for the generally conservative brewery.

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    1 - 2 / Pale Straw

    Original Gravity

    11.400 plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Hallertau +

    Flavor: Very smooth and earthy

    Aroma: Earthy noble aroma. Mild but spicy and pleasant

    Alpha Acids: 3.5 - 5.5%                   

    Beta Acids: 3 - 4%                

    Aroma

    Hersbruker-German +

    Flavor: Smooth and earthy. Not very harsh bitterness

    Aroma: Mild earthy and herbal

    Alpha Acids: 2 - 5%                         

    Beta Acids: 2.5 - 6%             

    Aroma

    Malt Variety

  • Stone Brewing Company Farking Wheaton W00t Stout
  • Stone Brewing Company Farking Wheaton W00t Stout

    Style

    Russian Imperial Stout

    Category

    Russian Imperial Stout

    IBU

    65

    ABV

    13.00

    Stone Brewing Company Farking Wheaton W00t Stout

    "This righteously flavorful imperial stout has been a favorite among our fans—and us—since its inception in 2013. In celebration of its third brewing, we’ve upped the barrel-aging quotient for 2015, adding to the mix a version of last year’s vintage that ...

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    "This righteously flavorful imperial stout has been a favorite among our fans—and us—since its inception in 2013. In celebration of its third brewing, we’ve upped the barrel-aging quotient for 2015, adding to the mix a version of last year’s vintage that we aged in bourbon barrels for a year. This whopping, complex stout will cellar beautifully—if you can wait that long.

    Eisner Award-winning comic-book cover artist Dave “The Reverend” Johnson created the fine art for the bottle in exchange for our donation to The Hero Initiative (heroinitiative.org), a charity organization that provides retirement funds for golden-age comic book artists." Commercial Description

    read less

    Style:
    Russian Imperial Stout

    Brewery:
    Stone Brewing Company

    1999 Citracado Parkway
    Escondido, CA 92029

    http://www.stonebrewing.com/

    Stone Brewing Co. is a brewery headquartered in Escondido, California. Founded in 1996 in San Marcos, California, it is the largest brewery in Southern California.  As of 2012, it was the tenth largest craft brewery in the United States and 17th largest brewery overall, based ...

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    Stone Brewing Co. is a brewery headquartered in Escondido, California. Founded in 1996 in San Marcos, California, it is the largest brewery in Southern California.  As of 2012, it was the tenth largest craft brewery in the United States and 17th largest brewery overall, based on sales volume. The brewery is owned by Steve Wagner and craft beer superstar Greg Koch.

    The brewery's first beer was Stone Pale Ale, which the company considers to be its flagship ale. However, the brewery is best known for their other core beer, Stone IPA, which is considered the benchmark of the American IPA style.

    The Arrogant Bastard line of ales best exhibits the brewery’s overall attitude, consisting of Stone Arrogant Bastard, Stone Double Bastard and Stone Lucky Bastard. A little known fact: owner Greg Koch considers Arrogant Bastard as a brand in its own right and gets very upset when the name Stone is used to describe Arrogant Bastard.

    Most of Stone’s beers are characteristic of West Coast craft brews, meaning that they have a high hop content. Compared to the macro-produced lagers, many Stone brews feature alcohol percentages that are well above average. The alcohol-by-volume content of Stone brews ranges from 4.2% to 13%.

    Stone Brewing is rated as a "world class brewery" by the two largest beer enthusiast websites, RateBeer and BeerAdvocate. Stone Brewing has been voted by the readers of Beer Advocate as the #1 "All Time Top Brewery on Planet Earth."

    Stone opened in San Marcos in 1996 at the location currently home to Port Brewing Company and The Lost Abbey. In 2006, Stone relocated from the original brewery to a new, custom-designed facility in Escondido. In 2013, the company opened a packaging hall just south of the brewery, which houses the bottling and keg lines. The brewery in Escondido produced 213,277 US beer barrels in 2013. The site is also home to a restaurant, Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens - Escondido, an 8,500-square-foot restaurant with a large outdoor patio and an acre of gardens. Stone also operates a 19-acre organic farm known as Stone Farms, just north of the brewery in Escondido, and several other restaurants in California.

    In June 2008, Stone Brewing covered the roof of the brewery with solar panels, cutting their energy costs nearly in half. The 1,561 roof-mounted solar modules will offset more than 538,000 pounds of carbon emissions over its lifetime, which is equivalent to planting 204 acres of trees.

    In July 2014, Stone Brewing Co. announced plans to open a brewery and restaurant in Berlin, Germany.

    In October 2014, Stone Brewing Co. announced the location of its first brewery and destination restaurant in the Eastern United States—Richmond, VA.  The facility is expected to be operation by late 2015 or early 2016. 

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    40 - 50 / Black

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Real Ale Brewing Company Firemans #4
  • Real Ale Brewing Company Firemans #4

    Style

    American Blonde Ale

    Category

    American Blonde Ale

    IBU

    23

    ABV

    5.10

    Real Ale Brewing Company Firemans #4

    "Named as a tribute to our good friends (and bad ass bike makers) at Fireman Texas Cruzer and because it was the fourth year-round beer we created, Firemans #4 is our most popular and best-selling beer to date. With an ever-drinkable balance of smooth malt ...

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    "Named as a tribute to our good friends (and bad ass bike makers) at Fireman Texas Cruzer and because it was the fourth year-round beer we created, Firemans #4 is our most popular and best-selling beer to date. With an ever-drinkable balance of smooth malt and zesty hops, this refreshing blonde is perfect on a hot day or paired with spicy food. It’s no wonder why so many Texans love it." Commercial Description

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    Style:
    American Blonde Ale

    American Blonde Ale

    Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

    Appearance
    The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
    Aroma/Flavor
    Blonde Ales have ...
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    American Blonde Ale

    Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

    Appearance
    The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
    Aroma/Flavor
    Blonde Ales have a light to moderate sweet malty aroma with low to moderate fruitiness.
    The flavor has an initial malty sweetness but optionally some bready, toasty or biscuit-like flavor. With a light to moderate hop flavor and low to medium bitterness, the finish is medium-dry to somewhat sweet. The mouthfeel is medium light to medium body with medium to high carbonation.

    Ingredients
     Usually, Blonde Ales use 100% malted barley, but sometimes as much as 25% wheat malt can be used. This beer can also be hopped with any hop. 

    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve Blonde Ale in an American Pint, and it's stored in our lager cooler at 35°. 

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 3.5%-5.5% and an average IBU range of 15-28.
    Examples
    Great craft examples of this style are Southern Star Bombshell Blonde Ale and Real Ale Fireman’s #4.

    History
    Blonde Ale is a modern American take on the old American cream style ale style, which were brewed by ale breweries to compete against larger producers in pre-Prohibition Northeast and Mid-Atlanta America.  Cream ales were not 100% malted barley, but contained a percentage of corn.  Blonde Ales are also called Golden Ales, but should not be confused with Belgian-Style Golden Ales.
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    Brewery:
    Real Ale Brewing Company

    231 San Saba Ct
    Blanco, TX 78606

    http://realalebrewing.com/

    Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

    read more

    Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

    Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

    Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

    Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

    The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

    They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

    Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

    Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

    Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

    In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    3 - 3 / Straw

    Original Gravity

    12.000 plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats Fort
  • Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats Fort

    Style

    Fruited Ale

    Category

    Fruited Ale

    IBU

    49

    ABV

    17.00

    Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats Fort

    Style:
    Fruited Ale

    Brewery:
    Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats

    320 Rehoboth Ave
    Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971

    http://www.dogfish.com/

    The story of Dogfish Head began in June of 1995 when they opened Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats, the Delaware's first brewpub. The plan was to bring original beer, original food and original music to the area.

    Not only was Dogfish Head Delaware’s first ...

    read more

    The story of Dogfish Head began in June of 1995 when they opened Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats, the Delaware's first brewpub. The plan was to bring original beer, original food and original music to the area.

    Not only was Dogfish Head Delaware’s first brewpub, it was the smallest commercial brewery in America. Their very first batch, Shelter Pale Ale, was brewed on a system which essentially was three little kegs with propane burners underneath. Brewing 12–gallon batches of beer for a whole restaurant proved to be more than a full time job. When the doors to the pub first opened, they brewed three times a day, five days a week. The one benefit to brewing on such a small system was the ability to try out a myriad of different recipes. 

    The beer wasn't the brewpub’s only draw. The pub's menu centered on a wood-burning grill. Dogfish Head soon became known as the place to enjoy fresh grilled seafood, burgers, pizzas and sandwiches. The wood–burning grill imparts a unique flavor to everything on the menu, whether it's a hearty sandwich, a delicate piece of fish or signature pizza dough.

    With the popularity of the pub growing, it was quickly apparent that the 12–gallon brewery would not keep up with demand. Dogfish Head built a new brewery and underwent a thirty-fold expansion of the brew house.

    The reputation of Dogfish Head ales quickly grew beyond Delaware's borders. Calls from Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and beyond poured in, as thirsty restaurant patrons demanded their favorite beach beer at home. They began bottling Shelter Pale Ale in 1996 and just one year later, they expanded again. This time, they separated the packaging operation from the restaurant. By 1999, they were up to five year–round bottled brands in about a dozen states.

    Dogfish Head outgrew their distributing brewery in a couple years and, in the summer of 2002, they moved their entire production brewery up the road to Milton, Del., into a 100,000-square-foot converted cannery. Around the same time, they built a distillery on the second floor of their Rehoboth Beach brewpub to make vodka, rum and gin.

    Dogfish Head now brews nearly 20 styles of beer that are sold in more than 25 states, as well as a half-dozen kinds of hand-crafted spirits.

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Avery Brewing Company Fortuna
  • Avery Brewing Company Fortuna

    Style

    Wild Ale

    Category

    Wild Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    8.11

    Avery Brewing Company Fortuna

    Sour ale that is aged in Tequila barrels with lime zest and salt.

    Sour ale that is aged in Tequila barrels with lime zest and salt.

    read less

    Style:
    Wild Ale

    Brewery:
    Avery Brewing Company

    4910 Nautilus Ct
    Boulder, CO 80301

    http://averybrewing.com/

    In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the ...

    read more

    In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the Avery Brewing Company in Boulder, Colorado and still acts as president and head brewer. 

    Like many of its older craft brew brethren, Avery started out very small. When it opened, the brewery utilized only a seven-barrel tank to ferment, leading to a very low volume of production. In the years since, the brewery has expanded significantly to encompass the entire block of warehouses where it’s located. Even after 21 years, Avery is still a relatively small operation with a limited national footprint.  We’re lucky Avery has been in the Texas market for many years.

    These days, Avery is best known for big, extreme beers, but that hasn’t always been the case. The original line-up consisted of an Amber Ale, a Brown and a Dry Stout. It wasn’t until 1995 that Avery released Avery IPA. In 1999, Avery released Hog Heaven, a beer that they still call American Barley Wine to this day, but in reality, Hog Heaven was one of the first Double IPAs in the world.

    It was around this time (late 1999 -2003) that Avery’s beer lineup became the heavy hitting powerhouse that it is today.  Reverend the Belgian Quad launched in 2000, Salvation the Belgium Golden in 2002, and in 2003, Czar the Russian Imperial Stout ascended to the throne and is one of Hay Merchant’s favorite Avery beers. Avery’s first experiments with barrel aging began in 2004, along with the release of the Maharaja, a 120 IBU 10.5% monster of an Imperial IPA.

    In recent years, Avery has become known for its sour barrel-aged beers. The first beer in the series, Barbant, was released and was limited to 694 cases. It was an ale pitched with Brett and aged for 9 months in Zinfandel barrels. Anvil Bar and Refuge (Hay Merchant’s sister cocktail bar) was one of the only bars in Texas to get a case of this very rare beer.  Over the last few years, Avery has released a few of these beers a year, and each one is different.

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    Glassware

    Bottle Size

    12oz

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Saint Arnold Brewing Company French Press
  • Saint Arnold Brewing Company French Press

    Style

    American Porter

    Category

    American Porter

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    9.40

    Saint Arnold Brewing Company French Press

    French Press is an Imperial Coffee Porter. For the coffee, we reunited with our local friends at Java Pura Coffee Roasters. The Espresso blend we used in this brew is the same one we used in our previous coffee beers: Icon Blue – Coffee Porter and ...

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    French Press is an Imperial Coffee Porter. For the coffee, we reunited with our local friends at Java Pura Coffee Roasters. The Espresso blend we used in this brew is the same one we used in our previous coffee beers: Icon Blue – Coffee Porter and Bishop’s Barrel No. 14.

    This beer has a bold chocolate and coffee flavor and aroma with a balanced roast bitterness and mild sweetness. It finishes with a nice balance of coffee and a slight chocolaty sweetness that doesn’t build and keeps you coming back for another sip.

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    Style:
    American Porter

    Porter
    Porter is a dark style of beer developed in London from well-hopped beers made from brown malt.
    Appearance
    Porters are medium brown to very dark brown, often with ruby or garnet-like highlights. They can approach black in color. Clarity may be difficult to discern ...
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    Porter
    Porter is a dark style of beer developed in London from well-hopped beers made from brown malt.
    Appearance
    Porters are medium brown to very dark brown, often with ruby or garnet-like highlights. They can approach black in color. Clarity may be difficult to discern in such a dark beer, but when not opaque, it will be clear (particularly when held up to the light). There is a full, tan-colored head with moderately good head retention.

    Aroma/Taste
    A roasty aroma—often with a lightly burnt, black malt character—is noticeable and may be moderately strong. Optionally, it may also show some additional malt character in support (grainy, bready, toffee-like, caramelly, chocolate, coffee, rich, and/or sweet). Hop aroma is low to high (U.S. or U.K. varieties). Some American versions may be dry-hopped. Fruity esters are moderate to none. Diacetyl is low to none.
    Moderately strong malt flavor usually features a lightly burnt, black malt character (and sometimes chocolate and/or coffee flavors) with a bit of roasty dryness in the finish. Overall flavor may finish from dry to medium-sweet, depending on grist composition, hop bittering level and attenuation. It may have a sharp character from dark roasted grains, although taste is not overly acrid, burnt or harsh. There is medium to high bitterness, which can be accentuated by the roasted malt. Hop flavor can vary from low to moderately high (U.S. or U.K. varieties) and balances the roasted malt flavors. Diacetyl is low to none. Fruity esters are moderate to none. It has medium to medium-full body and moderately low to moderately high carbonation. Stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth. It may have a slight astringency from roasted grains, although this character is not strong. 
    Ingredients
    Porters may contain several malts, prominently dark roasted malts and grains, which often include black patent malt (chocolate malt and/or roasted barley may also be used in some versions). Hops are used for bittering, flavor and/or aroma, and are frequently found in U.K. or U.S. varieties. Water with moderate to high carbonate hardness is typical. Ale yeast can either be clean in U.S. versions or characterful in English varieties.
    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 4%-7% and an average IBU range of 25-50.
    Examples
    Great examples of this style are Anchor Porter, Deschutes Black Butte and (512) Pecan porter.

    History 
    Porter has a very distinct origin and reason for being created. There were three types of beer available in London in the early 1700s: Strong ale, Common Ale and Stale Ale. Common Ale was the “running beer,” made after a Strong Ale in the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength). Stale Ale was what was left in a cask after it had gone stale. These three types of beer were very inconsistent. In order to create a consistent product, they were often all mixed together to order and called “Three Threads.” In 1722, Ralph Harwood, Proprietor of The Bell Brewhouse, created a beer that had all the characteristics of three threads but was from one cask. It was nicknamed Porter by the Publicans because Porters were his best customers for the new beer.
    Porter was the beer that allowed England to creep ahead of other countries in the brewing world. It was inexpensive to brew and was able to age. It was a beer for and from the industrial revolution. The most successful Porter brewer of the 1700s was Samuel Whitbread of London, who started brewing in 1742.
    Porter was commonly imported to the American Colonies until the 1760s, when tensions rose between England and the colonies, and American brewers had to take up the slack. Porter was George Washington's preferred beer.
    In 1817, with the advent of Black Patent Malt, Porter gained its darker color and went from a brown beer to a black beer. Guinness actually started as a porter brewer before stouts branched off of Porters and were among the first to use Black Patent Malt.
    Porter was a major part of the beer industry in England from its inception. Though, starting in the 1830s, its popularity declined as many people started drinking more pale ale and Gin. By the 1930s English Porter a had almost entirely disappeared.  It finally disappeared in Ireland in 1972.
    There has been a renaissance of Porter in recent years due to the growing craft beer scene in America.  Yuengling, however, has made porter since the 1870s (other than the interruption of prohibition) and still makes Porter today.
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    Brewery:
    Saint Arnold Brewing Company

    2000 Lyons Avenue
    Houston, TX 77020

    http://www.saintarnold.com/

    The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have ...

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    The Saint Arnold Brewing Company is a brewery in Houston, Texas, named after a patron saint of brewing, Saint Arnulf of Metz. Founded in 1994 by Rice University graduates Brock Wagner and Kevin Bartol, the brewery offers tours every weekday and Saturday afternoons, which have attracted a large following. Saint Arnold has won numerous national and international awards.

    Saint Arnold was originally located on the far northwest side of Houston and operated out of that location for more than fifteen years. In 2009, Saint Arnold purchased a three-story 104,000-square-foot brick building—constructed in 1914 and most recently used as a food service facility for the Houston Independent School District—north of Downtown Houston. The maximum capacity of the new brewery is over 100,000 barrels, compared to 26,000 barrels at the previous location. As of 2015 the brewery is brewing just under 60,000 barrels a year. A large percentage of the brewery’s production capacity is taken up by beer brewed under contract for BJ’s Brewhouse.

    Saint Arnold is known for a core lineup, including Lawnmower, a light bodied German Style Kolsch, as well as a traditional American Style IPA, Elissa. In recent years, Saint Arnold has began to step out of the traditional mold it has followed for years. In 2013, they launched two new lines of beers: Icon is a series of more unique beers released four times a year, and Bishop’s Barrel, a special release series sold only in the bottle available only to bars and restaurants. While coming late to the barrel aging game, the Bishop’s Barrel series has been a hit with fans. In the summer of 2014, Saint Arnold released a Berliner Weisse. Very popular with craft beer fans, the slightly sour German style is an extreme and surprising beer for the generally conservative brewery.

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Great Heights Brewing Company Fruity Pellets
  • Great Heights Brewing Company Fruity Pellets

    Style

    IPA

    Category

    IPA

    IBU

    17

    ABV

    6.20

    Great Heights Brewing Company Fruity Pellets

    Wheat and flaked oats produce a hazy beer with a soft, creamy mouthfeel. Citra, Mosaic, and Amarillo hops are added liberally post-boil, contributing massive citrus and tropical aromas without the traditional hop bitterness. 

    Wheat and flaked oats produce a hazy beer with a soft, creamy mouthfeel. Citra, Mosaic, and Amarillo hops are added liberally post-boil, contributing massive citrus and tropical aromas without the traditional hop bitterness. 

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    Style:
    IPA

    IPA (India Pale Ale) 
    Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
    About Pale Ales
    Pale Ale is a large category ...
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    IPA (India Pale Ale) 
    Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
    About Pale Ales
    Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

    Appearance
    The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

    Aroma/Taste
    A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
    The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
    Ingredients
    IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
    Examples
    Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

    History 
    The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
    Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
    It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
    American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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    Brewery:
    Great Heights Brewing Company

    938 Wakefield Drive
    Houston, TX 77018

    https://www.greatheightsbrewing.com/

    We're just a couple of guys living the dream of quitting desk jobs and ditching long hours at the office for even longer hours at the brewery—we couldn't be happier. Swing by our neighborhood taproom and say hi and cheers with us!

    We're just a couple of guys living the dream of quitting desk jobs and ditching long hours at the office for even longer hours at the brewery—we couldn't be happier. Swing by our neighborhood taproom and say hi and cheers with us!

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    Glassware

    Tulip

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Amarillo +

    Flavor: Citrus notes, specifically orange and grapefruit.

    Aroma: Lots of orange peel.

    Alpha Acids: 8.0 - 11.0%                 

    Beta Acids: 6.0% - 7.0%      

    Dual Purpose

    Citra +

    Flavor: Lemon/lime and tropical fruitiness.

    Aroma: Very clean citrus aroma.

    Alpha Acids: 10 - 14%         

    Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

    Aroma

    Mosaic +

    Flavor: Tropical fruits and blueberry notes

    Aroma: Complex tropical flavors with some citrus and berry notes.

    Alpha Acids: 11.5 - 13.5%               

    Beta Acids: 3.2 - 3.9%          

    Aroma

    Malt Variety

  • Real Ale Brewing Company Full Tilt Boogie
  • Real Ale Brewing Company Full Tilt Boogie

    Style

    American Barley Wine

    Category

    American Barley Wine

    IBU

    45

    ABV

    10.00

    Real Ale Brewing Company Full Tilt Boogie

    Malty on the sweet side with a hoppy presence. A little roasty and slightly smoky on the back end.

    Malty on the sweet side with a hoppy presence. A little roasty and slightly smoky on the back end.

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    Style:
    American Barley Wine

    American Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines ...
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    American Barley Wine
    Barley Wine can be simply defined as the biggest pale beer a brewery releases. It’s a spin-off of Old and Stock Ales. They are basically the same beer with 3 key differences: the ABV, the color and the story. Barley Wines today can be broken into to main styles: American and English. The only difference between the two is that American Barley Wine has a higher hop profile and English Barley Wines are more defined by their malt flavors. Imperial IPA could fit into this style except for the fact that they are defined by an extreme hoppiness.

    About Strong Ales
    Strong Ale is a general term used to describe high ABV beers (7%+). It is not itself a style and lacks the specificity to describe any one beer. The term can be used to describe beers like Imperial IPAs, Russian Imperial Stouts or Belgian Quads, but in practice, the term is used as the general category for Old Ales/Stock Ales and Barley Wines. 
    Appearance
    The color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown, but not black. It will often have ruby highlights. Barley wine has an off-white head that may have poor retention. This beer exhibits good to brilliant clarity. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

    Aroma/Taste
    The aroma is very rich with strong maltiness. American versions have a strong citrusy hop note. This hoppiness may disappear with age. Strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics are present but not clawing. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics.
    There are strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors ranging from bready and biscuity to nutty, deep toasted dark caramel, toffee and/or molasses. American versions will have a noticeably hoppy bitterness and citrusy notes. Depending on aging, the finish might be dry or malty sweet. 
    Ingredients
    Pale malt makes up the backbone of the grist with the addition of caramel malts. American versions will use proportionally more hops than English versions. The darker colors do not come from dark malts—the lengthy boil results in kettle caramelization of the wort. The result of the first running from the parti-gyle system (a process where one grist is used to make several beers of progressively weaker strength), Barley Wines are mashed at lower temperatures to allow for a higher amount of fermentable sugars, resulting in a higher alcohol content than Stock Ales.
    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in a snifter or tulip, depending on cost and ABV, poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 12%+ and an average IBU range of 30-70 (English) and 70-120 (American).
    Examples
    Great examples of this style are Real Ale Sisyphus, Stone Old Guardian, Live Oak Old Treehugger, North Coast Old Stock and Anchor Old Foghorn.

    History 
    This style became more readily available in the U.K. around 1850, as technological innovations that made pale malt more economical feasible were developed. Unlike Stock Ales that were brewed for the purpose of blending, Barley Wines were brewed to be consumed without blending. The high price of these beers generally made them only accessible to the very rich. However, as pale malt became more common, the price slowly became more approachable to a wider audience.  Bass introduced the first commercially produced Barley Wine in 1854. The Great Wine Blight struck France around 1858, destroying most of the market and sending the price of wine through the roof. These factors led advertisers to begin marketing the pale Strong Ale as “malt wine” and “malt liquor.” 
    The style was a mainstay of British brewers until the Free Mash Tun Act of 1880 put higher tax pressure on barley wine producers. This did not stop production or demand—Barley Wines were brewed more selectively. It did, however, lead to a slow long-term decline in the alcohol content. Where the style used to commonly weigh in at over 10% ABV, most British Barley wines of the 20th century fell to below 7% ABV. It wasn’t until Anchor brewing released “Old Foghorn” in 1975 that Barley Wines in there true form began to make a comeback.
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    Brewery:
    Real Ale Brewing Company

    231 San Saba Ct
    Blanco, TX 78606

    http://realalebrewing.com/

    Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye ...

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    Philip and Diane Conner and their son, Charles, founded the Real Ale Brewing Company in Blanco, Texas in 1996. They set up shop in the basement of an antiques store on the Blanco town square. They had three original recipes brewing—Full Moon Pale Rye Ale, Rio Blanco Pale Ale and Brewhouse Brown Ale. They were brewing on converted dairy and handmade equipment.

    Then they met a young man named Brad. Brad Farbstein was a UT graduate with a degree in economics, an avid homebrewer and was employed by a small craft beer distributor.  Brad had become a pretty big fan of this tiny brewery and found himself occasionally heading out to Blanco to lend Philip and Charles a hand with some bottling or labeling, working for a few beers. Coincidentally, it was around this time that Philip decided to get out of the brewing business. He asked Brad if he might know anyone interested in buying the brewery’s equipment. Recognizing a rare opportunity to turn a dream into reality—even though he had no idea how he was going to pull it off—Brad said, “I’m your man.”

    Brad took over the brewery in the summer of 1998, and with the help of two employees, made about 500 barrels of beer that year. The original brewery had a 2-vessel, 15-bbl brewhouse that was basically outside, housed in a carport attached to the store’s basement.  Tanks, cold storage, bottling and labeling equipment and everything else were crammed in a space of less than 2,500 square feet with only 7-foot high ceilings. If you were to design a space to NOT be a brewery, this would probably be it. In spite of the many obstacles, spatial and otherwise, facing the fledgling brewery, the beer flowed and demand for RABC’s handcrafted ales grew exponentially for the next several years.

    Real Ale steadily increased its output until finally maxing out the original location at 5,500 barrels in 2006. (If you do the math, that’s 366 batches of beer in one year on a 15 barrel system!) In 2005, Brad realized that for Real Ale to achieve its potential, something had to be done. He took another leap of faith purchased several acres of land just outside the Blanco city limits to allow for the construction of a new brewery from the ground up. Brad likes to say that many years of having to do things the wrong way taught him how to do things the right way.  Construction began in 2005 and the brewery went online in 2006.

    The brewery has under gone several small expansions after the big move in 2006. In 2013, the brewery produced approximately 53,000 barrels of beer. As of 2015, RABC had 25 fermenters available ranging in size from 60 bbl to 480 bbl.

    They brew on a 60 barrel four-vessel brewhouse consisting of the mash tun, in which they can conduct single and step infusions as well as single decoction mashes, a lauter tun, a kettle, and a whirlpool, with a throughput of 6 brews a day.  All of the fermenters are cylindroconical, otherwise known as unitanks. Unitanks allow the beer to ferment and condition in the same vessel. The packing hall was the newest expansion, which has an average daily output of 2,400 cases of bottles, 1,200 cases of cans and 200 kegs, with a new bottle filler capable of filling 400 bottles a minute.

    Brad credits the local Blanco River as "some of the best brewing water for the styles of beer that we make," making Blanco an ideal location for the brewery. The term Real Ale is an English phrase referring to cask conditioned ales. It’s ironic that for the first half of the brewery’s history, they did not make a cask conditioned beer. However once they began to cask condition, they quickly became the best producer of the method in the state. Large cask beer bars like Hay Merchant owe a lot to the knowledge and expertise Real Ale brought to the market.

    Real Ale is best known for the Firemans #4, a light, easy drinking Blonde Ale named after Firemans Texas Cruzer, a small local BMX bike builder.  But RABC has gained wide craft beer respect with beers from the Mysterium Verum and Brewer’s Cut lines.

    Mysterium Verum is a line of beers in which the beers are aged in barrels. Some of these beers are additionally inoculated with wild yeast and/or bacteria. These beers range greatly in flavor and can only be found on draft and are the rarest beers RABC produces.

    In 2012, RABC add the Brewer’s Cut product line, which focuses on developing new recipes to put out to the public, and then relying on customer feedback through social media to determine whether the recipe will be bumped up to a year-round product, a seasonal product, or set with plans to be brewed at a later date again in the series. This is a limited-release product and can be found in both package and draft.

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales Gammaredux
  • Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales Gammaredux

    Style

    Sour Pale Ale

    Category

    Sour Pale Ale

    IBU

    55

    ABV

    7.30

    Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales Gammaredux

    Style:
    Sour Pale Ale

    Brewery:
    Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales

    311 S. Main St.
    Ann Arbor, MI 48104

    http://www.jollypumpkin.com/jp/home

    Ron Jeffries founded Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in 2004 in Dexter, Michigan. It operates two pubs, one in Ann Arbor and the other in Traverse City. Jolly Pumpkin produces a variety of unfiltered and unpasteurized "rustic country" beers.

    Jolly Pumpkin ages their beers in wine ...

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    Ron Jeffries founded Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in 2004 in Dexter, Michigan. It operates two pubs, one in Ann Arbor and the other in Traverse City. Jolly Pumpkin produces a variety of unfiltered and unpasteurized "rustic country" beers.

    Jolly Pumpkin ages their beers in wine barrels, which contain naturally occurring microbiological cultures including brettanomyces. These cultures produce a complex flavor profile in their beers, which includes flavors described as leathery, earthy, wild, funky, or even "sweaty horse hair character,” which may approximate how beer tasted before the advent of pasteurization and industrialization. This style of beer has been described as "farmhouse ale" or American Wild Ale. Jolly Pumpkin was not the first brewery in the U.S. to start brewing these styles, but it is one of the most well known.

    Their year-round productions include Oro de Calabaza, La Roja, Calabaza Blanca, Bam Biere, and Bam Noire.  Their seasonal beers include Madrugada Obscura “Dark Dawn”, Biere de Mars, E.S. Bam, Luciernaga “The Firefly” Weizen Bam Miere, La Parcela, Fuego del Otono, Noel de Calabaza, Marcaibo Especial, and Perseguidor.

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    Glassware

    Sour

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co. Ginger Melon Mule
  • Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co. Ginger Melon Mule

    Style

    American Blonde Ale

    Category

    American Blonde Ale

    IBU

    14

    ABV

    5.80

    Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co. Ginger Melon Mule

    Style:
    American Blonde Ale

    American Blonde Ale

    Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

    Appearance
    The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
    Aroma/Flavor
    Blonde Ales have ...
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    American Blonde Ale

    Known as the entry-level craft beer, Blonde Ale is easy-drinking, approachable and malt-oriented.

    Appearance
    The appearance is light yellow to deep gold, clear to brilliant. A low to medium white head exists with fair to good retention.
    Aroma/Flavor
    Blonde Ales have a light to moderate sweet malty aroma with low to moderate fruitiness.
    The flavor has an initial malty sweetness but optionally some bready, toasty or biscuit-like flavor. With a light to moderate hop flavor and low to medium bitterness, the finish is medium-dry to somewhat sweet. The mouthfeel is medium light to medium body with medium to high carbonation.

    Ingredients
     Usually, Blonde Ales use 100% malted barley, but sometimes as much as 25% wheat malt can be used. This beer can also be hopped with any hop. 

    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve Blonde Ale in an American Pint, and it's stored in our lager cooler at 35°. 

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 3.5%-5.5% and an average IBU range of 15-28.
    Examples
    Great craft examples of this style are Southern Star Bombshell Blonde Ale and Real Ale Fireman’s #4.

    History
    Blonde Ale is a modern American take on the old American cream style ale style, which were brewed by ale breweries to compete against larger producers in pre-Prohibition Northeast and Mid-Atlanta America.  Cream ales were not 100% malted barley, but contained a percentage of corn.  Blonde Ales are also called Golden Ales, but should not be confused with Belgian-Style Golden Ales.
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    Brewery:
    Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co.

    5301 Nolda Street
    Houston, TX 77007

    http://www.buffbrew.com/

    Buffalo Bayou Brewery was founded in 2012 in Houston by Rassul Zarinfar, a Harvard MBA with experience in beer distribution, and brewer Ryan Robertson. The brewery honors the Houston community by incorporating local ingredients from farms and nearby vendors.

    Buff Brew's Heritage Series combines ...

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    Buffalo Bayou Brewery was founded in 2012 in Houston by Rassul Zarinfar, a Harvard MBA with experience in beer distribution, and brewer Ryan Robertson. The brewery honors the Houston community by incorporating local ingredients from farms and nearby vendors.

    Buff Brew's Heritage Series combines classical brewing techniques and rich Houston flavors, inspired by the history of Houston. Traditional recipes are transformed and redefined as vintage flavors are combined in new ways. The flagship beer of the Heritage Series is 1836, described as a "copper ale," named after Houston's founding year.  The beer is a combination of sweet and toasty Victory malts and earthy, woody, floral American hops. 

    Single batch and anti-session, the Secessionist Series of beers are tributes to the revolutionary acts of sedition of Houston's mutineers. The ambitious and boundary-pushing ingredients are inspired by the city's most challenging conditions. 

    The brewery is located in central Houston in the Heights neighborhood and offers brewery tours on Saturdays. 

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Van Steenberge Gulden Draak
  • Van Steenberge Gulden Draak

    Style

    Belgian Strong Dark

    Category

    Belgian Strong Dark

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    10.50

    Van Steenberge Gulden Draak

    "

    Did you know the Gulden Draak (Golden Dragon) owes its name to the gilded statue on top of the Belfry in Ghent?

    The legend says the gilded dragon first featured on the prow of the ship with which the Norwegian king Sigrid Magnusson left on ...

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    "

    Did you know the Gulden Draak (Golden Dragon) owes its name to the gilded statue on top of the Belfry in Ghent?

    The legend says the gilded dragon first featured on the prow of the ship with which the Norwegian king Sigrid Magnusson left on a crusade in 1111. He offered the statue to the emperor of Constantinople (the current Istanbul) to put it on the cupola of the Aya Sophia. Some hundred years later, the Flemish count Baldwin IX had the showpiece transported to our regions. Here, the Norwegian dragon ended up in the hands of Bruges. After the battle on the field of Beverhout in 1382, the inhabitants of Ghent took the dragon as war booty and put it on top of their Belfry. In the Belfry all communal charters were kept. The dragon had to protect these documents and it was also the symbol of the freedom and might of the city.

    Such an imposing symbol that has lasted for over 6 centuries needs an equally imposing beer. Like the dragon shines at the top of the city, the Gulden Draak is part of the international top of beers. It is a dark triple, which in itself makes it an exceptional beer. But it is the complex taste with hints of caramel, roasted malt and coffee in combination with the creamy hazel head that makes it unique. It is a beer that is worthy of its name.

    Like the other special beers of the Brewery Van Steenberge, Gulden Draak is a high fermentation beer with secondary fermentation. For the secondary fermentation, wine yeast is used. This also contributes to the unparalleled taste.

    And of course, a unique beer deserves a unique presentation. That’s why Gulden Draak is presented in a white bottle. The white bottle, the black banner, the golden dragon and the red letters, constitute a stylish result that has no equal among the many Belgian special beers.

    Gulden Draak can be drunk as an aperitif or dessert, or whenever you have the time to sit back and relax. But this barley wine is also perfect with and in stews, especially the Ghent variety. It is also a plus in sauces for red meat, such as a bordelaise. It is particularly suited as a dessert beer, especially in combination with dark chocolate." -Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Belgian Strong Dark

    Brewery:
    Van Steenberge

    Lindenlaan 25
    Ertvelde, B-9940

    http://www.vansteenberge.com/en/

    Like many others of its kind, this brewery originated from a ploughland farm, that was also engaged in brewing beer for its own consumption. The first time this brewery was mentioned on paper was in 1784 under the name of "Brouwerij De Peer." It is ...

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    Like many others of its kind, this brewery originated from a ploughland farm, that was also engaged in brewing beer for its own consumption. The first time this brewery was mentioned on paper was in 1784 under the name of "Brouwerij De Peer." It is very likely however, that there had been a brewery long before that time but that the farmer, John Baptist De Bruin, a native of the village 'St. Kruis Winkel' which is located not too far from the brewery, did not leave any written documents behind until that point in time.

    Gradually, brewing became the farm's main pursuit and eventually all agricultural activities were abandoned between the two World Wars. After John Baptist's death, his widow, Angelina Petronella Schelfout, continued the business. From 1876 on, her nephew Jozef Schelfout gave her a helping hand. The brewery was extended with a malting house and a hops field. Indeed, many inhabitants of Ertvelde, the village where the brewery is located, can remember the two-acres field that belonged to the brewery.

    Jozef Schelfout's daughter, Magaretha, married Paul van Steenberge, who became mayor of Ertvelde and even Senator in the Belgian Parliament. It was Paul, who eventually changed the brewery's name into "Brouwerij Bios," Bios meaning life. The beer in stock was labeled "Bios": it was a mixture of young beer weakened with a two year old brew. This style of beer today is called: old Brown. The brewer named the beer "Vlaamse Bourgogne" (Flemisch Burgundy), a proper name for such fine quality beer.

    In order to comply with changes in common taste, bottom fermentation was introduced. A new brand was born: "Leute Bock", (Leute = Joy) but a commercial name seemed more suitable, and it became SPARTA PILS. The feasibility of this rather expensive switch to lager, depended entirely on the enormous success of the Flemish Burgundy that paid for the investment: better cooling, new lagering tanks in aluminum. On top of that, the old fashioned barrels were to be replaced by glass bottles!

    After WW I, the brewery started the production of lemonade. Mr. Jozef Van Steenberge (son of Paul and brewer till 1990) shepherded his business through the crisis of WW II. A war that unfortunately meant the end of hundreds of Flemish village breweries.

    Due to the prospering of regional beers, the brewery knew a tremendous uplift. In 1978, the brewery was able to get hold of the recipe and yeasts from the Augustiner monks in Gent, who decided to stop brewing and license the beer out to the Van Steenberge brewery. The brew-engineer at that time, Mr. De Vroe, refined the AUGUSTIJN ale, and turned it into the show-piece of de Van Steenberge brewery. Today, this beer and other special artisanal beers like the Piraat, Gulden Draak, Bruegel and Bornem, all of top-fermentation, make the brewery grow continuously.

    In 1990, Mr. Paul Van Steenberge (Joseph's son) took over the mash staff and the brewery. Enormous investments allowed the brewery to follow the technological evolution closely. By the end of 1992, this resulted in the installation of a completely computerized and automated brewery: a real masterpiece. The first in Belgium at that time.

    Where is the brewery today? Last year they produced about 35,000 barrels (50,000 HL) of beer with 31 people. Most of the production is sold in Belgium. The export brings the beer all over the world. The top export market is Italy, followed by Holland and the USA. Then comes France, Spain, Switzerland, Germany and other countries.

    The mission of the brewery is to brew an exceptional world class beer product, and to stay independent.

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    Glassware

    Tulip

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    23.000 plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Live Oak Brewing Company Hefeweizen
  • Live Oak Brewing Company Hefeweizen

    Style

    Hefeweizen

    Category

    Hefeweizen

    IBU

    12

    ABV

    5.20

    Live Oak Brewing Company Hefeweizen

    "Modeled after the classic wheat beers of Bavaria, Hefeweizen is cloudy and straw-colored with a meringue-like head that lingers to the bottom of the glass. Brewed with an ample volume of wheat malt and few hops, this beer features a unique yeast strain that produces ...

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    "Modeled after the classic wheat beers of Bavaria, Hefeweizen is cloudy and straw-colored with a meringue-like head that lingers to the bottom of the glass. Brewed with an ample volume of wheat malt and few hops, this beer features a unique yeast strain that produces harmonious notes of clove, banana, and vanilla throughout this effervescent brew. A traditional interpretation of a classic style, this idiosyncratic Bavarian beer is perfectly at home here in Texas." Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Hefeweizen

    The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably) the ...

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    The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably) the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat. Weissbier is German for “white beer.” Weissbiers were much paler than the dark beers that were so popular in Bavaria in earlier times, so the word “white” is used relatively. By today’s standards, Weissbier is more golden due to the development of light beers like Pilsner and Helles.

    The terms Hefe Weissbier or Hefe Weizen refer to any Weissbier that has yeast (Hefe) in it (i.e., a bottle-conditioned Weissbier). Outside Bavaria, most wheat beers are called Hefeweizen regardless of the yeast content or flavor profile. This practice is becoming less frequent as the American beer drinker becomes more savvy. We use the name Hefeweizen to describe a very specific German style of top fermenting wheat beer.

    Appearance 
    The appearance of Hefeweizen is pale straw to very dark gold in color. A good amount of haziness should be expected and is appropriate. A very thick, mousse-like, long lasing white head is characteristic.

    Aroma/Flavor
    The aroma has moderate to strong phenols and fruity esters. Noble hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma may be present. Acceptable aromatics can include a light, citrusy tartness, a light to moderate vanilla character and a low bubblegum and banana aroma.

    The flavor is a low to moderately strong banana and clove flavor. The balance and intensity of the phenol and ester components can vary.  A very light to moderate vanilla character or low bubblegum notes can accentuate the banana flavor. The soft, bready or grainy flavor of wheat is complementary. Hop flavor is low to none. A tart, citrusy character from yeast and high carbonation is often present. Well rounded with dry finish.

    The mouthfeel is medium-light to medium body.  The texture of wheat imparts the sensation of a fluffy, creamy fullness that may progress to a light, spritzy finish aided by high carbonation. Overall, a pale, spicy, fruity, refreshing wheat-based ale should be expected

    Ingredients 
    According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat.

    Glassware and Serving Temperature 
    At Hay Merchant we serve this style in a 20oz German Pilsner glass from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

    Stats 
    Beers of this style are most often 4.3% - 5.6% ABV and 8-15 IBU. 

    Examples 
    Beers like Live Oak Hefeweizen, and Weihenstephaner Hefe Weissbier are great examples of the style. 

    History 
    By the end of the middle ages in Germany, both barley and wheat were being used to make a top-fermented beer. The first true Weissbiers were made toward the end of the 15th century. In 1602, Duke Maximilian I placed a ban on public Weissbier brewing, and the Bavarian House of Dukes became the only body with the legal authority to brew Weissbiers. The profits from Prince Maximilian’s Weiss brewing helped fund the Thirty Years War.

    As the popularity of Weissbier waned, the German House of Dukes begin to outsource the reasonability to brew to the private sector around the early part of the 1800s but still maintained control.

    But the move to private brewing would not be enough to save Weissbier from extinction.  In 1855, Georg Schneider bought Wesses Brauhaus in Munich. In 1872, he worked a deal that ended the 250 year reign of royal brewing and allowed him to operate under his own terms. Even still, it wasn’t until the end of World War II that Weissbier regained its place as the No. 1 beer in Germany. Weissbier accounts for around 22 percent of the German market. It’s is the No. 1 selling micro-brewed style in Australia and can be found in the lineup of many American microbreweries.

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    Brewery:
    Live Oak Brewing Company

    3301 E 5th St
    Austin, TX 78702

    http://liveoakbrewing.com/

    The Live Oak Brewing Company, located in Austin, Texas since 1997, is a locally owned and operated brewery. Founder Chip McElroy can still be seen at the brewery almost every day.

    Live Oak is best known for their traditional German style lagers. They also produce ...

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    The Live Oak Brewing Company, located in Austin, Texas since 1997, is a locally owned and operated brewery. Founder Chip McElroy can still be seen at the brewery almost every day.

    Live Oak is best known for their traditional German style lagers. They also produce a very good year-round IPA (often available on cask at Hay Merchant), as well as an amazing English Barley Wine. The brewery produces four year-round beers as well as four seasonal (or special release) beers. Live Oak beers are only available on draft.

    While Live Oak uses industry standard step mashing for most of their beers, they use a more difficult and rarely used old-world style of mashing known as decoction mashing for a few of their beers, most notably the Live Oak Pilz and the Oaktoberfest. Live Oak uses large dairy tanks as fermenting vessels instead of the more traditional cylindroconical fermenters.

    The brewery is currently run out of an old industrial building in Southeast Austin. Recently, the company purchased 20 acres of undeveloped land on the Colorado river just north of the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport on which to build a new brewery, estimated to take "a couple of years” to complete. When this expansion is completed, it is expected that they will add a bottling line.

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    Glassware

    Pilsner

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    3 - 3 / Straw

    Original Gravity

    12.900 plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier Helles
  • Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier Helles

    Style

    Helles

    Category

    Helles

    IBU

    30

    ABV

    4.30

    Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier Helles

    "“Schlenkerla Helles” is brewed with fine Bavarian aroma hops from the area around the city of Nürnberg. It's lagered in century old caves underneath the historic Schlenkerla brewery and maltings. Schlenkerla Helles is boiled in the same copper kettles and bottom fermented by ...

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    "“Schlenkerla Helles” is brewed with fine Bavarian aroma hops from the area around the city of Nürnberg. It's lagered in century old caves underneath the historic Schlenkerla brewery and maltings. Schlenkerla Helles is boiled in the same copper kettles and bottom fermented by the same yeast as the historic Schlenkerla Smokebeer. Its subtle smokiness without using smoke malt makes “Helles Schlenkerla Lager” a unique representative of the classic lager beer style “Bavarian Helles”" Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Helles

    Helles
    Developed by Bavarians in response to the popularity of Bohemian Pilsner, Helles means “pale” in German. It’s clean and balanced, with a light color. 
    Appearance 
    Helles beer has a pale straw color and is clear with a thick, long lasting head.

    Aroma/Flavor ...
    read more
    Helles
    Developed by Bavarians in response to the popularity of Bohemian Pilsner, Helles means “pale” in German. It’s clean and balanced, with a light color. 
    Appearance 
    Helles beer has a pale straw color and is clear with a thick, long lasting head.

    Aroma/Flavor
    Helles has a clean, mild malt-accented aromas.  It may be slightly sulfurous. 

    The style is clean, balanced and delicate.  It’s medium bodied—the relatively high protein levels contribute to a fuller body than might be expected from its color. There is muted hop character.  The water in Southern Bavaria is medium hard, and the harder the water, the more perceived hop bitterness.  The finish is malty and dry, but not astringent. 

    Ingredients 
    The foundation of Helles is North American two-row or Pils pale malt based on Harrington or Klages.  They give Helles its body, pale color and light flavor. Noble hop varieties can include Hallertauer Muttelfruh, Tettnanger and Hersbrucker or North American Mt. Hood.  Any hop varieties that add strong, spicy, citrus, acrid, floral or piney notes must not be used, as these would ruin the balanced flavor profile of Helles. 
    Bavarian-style lager yeast of the Saccharomyces uvarum family are used, which are slow acting and contain some clarifying agents.  Helles can be made with only one variety of hop and one variety of malt, but must be of higher quality that are native to the Bavarian region. 
    Helles is lagered near the freezing point between 4 to 6 weeks on the yeast to bring out its delicacy and softness.  This allows the yeast to reabsorb its less attractive metabolic byproducts, including the small amount of diacetyl—the flavor compound found in most beers imparting butterscotch characteristics—it produces. It also prevents the oxidation of ethanol into aldehydes, which can give the beer an undesirable green apple aroma and allows the beer to keep longer. 
    Glassware and Serving Temperature 
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

    Stats
    Beers of this style are most often 4.7%-5.4% ABV and 18-25 IBU. 

    Example
    Great examples of this style are Victory Lager and Saint Arnold Summer Pils. 

    History 
    Bavarian brewing laws have played an important role in bringing about the Helles style.  The influential 1516 Reinheitsgebot demanded that brewers use only barley, hops and water (yeast was not yet understood), and the 1553 summer brewing prohibition that prohibited brewing in the summer months had the unintended consequence of making all Bavarian brews lagers since ale yeasts stayed dormant during the cold months when brewing was allowed. 
    Clearer, lighter beers became more popular as Bavarians made a late transition from traditional gray beer steins called Keferlohers to modern glassware. This was initially met with resistance from traditionalists who only considered dark beer to be authentically Bavarian. 
    In 1833, Gabriel Sedlmayr (the younger) of the Spaten Brewery and Anton Dreher of the Dreher Brewery in Vienna toured England to study their most recent advances in brewing—including Daniel Wheeler’s 1818 patented metal drum for drying grain that allowed for the slow controlled drying process Helles needs to achieve its very pale malt. Another event that led to the development of Helles was Spaten’s modernization of their brewery with German engineer Carl von Linde’s 1873 invention of a refrigeration system for fermentation tanks.  Spaten could then control the fermentation and conditioning of their beers and produce top quality lagers year round. 
    In 1878, Bavarian Lorenz Enzinger invented mechanical beer filtration that removed yeast cells and other suspended particles from the finished beer.  In 1872, a golden yellow brew labeled “Marzen-Bier” was released by Franziskaner-Leist-Brauerei of Munich, followed by Hacker-Brauerei’s Muncher Gold in 1893. After market testing in Hamburg, Spaten released Helles Lagerbier on June 20, 1895, in Munich. Northern Germans adopted the Helles style with more battering hops to produce the German Pilsner.  There is also a stronger version called Bavarian Export, which is around 5.5% ABV. 
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    Brewery:
    Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier

    Dominikanerstrasse 6
    Bamberg, 96049

    http://www.schlenkerla.de/indexe.html

    The historic smoked beer brewery Schlenkerla is located in the middle of the old part of Bamberg.  Bamberg's specialty, the original Schlenkerla Smokebeer, is still being tapped directly from the wooden barrel according to old tradition.

    Its smoky flavor is achieved by exposing the ...

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    The historic smoked beer brewery Schlenkerla is located in the middle of the old part of Bamberg.  Bamberg's specialty, the original Schlenkerla Smokebeer, is still being tapped directly from the wooden barrel according to old tradition.

    Its smoky flavor is achieved by exposing the malt to the intense, aromatic smoke of burning beechwood logs at the Schlenkerla maltings. After mixing it with premium-class hops in the brew, it matures in 700-year-old cellars into a mellow beer. 

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    11.500 plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Avery Brewing Company Insula Multos Collibus
  • Avery Brewing Company Insula Multos Collibus

    Style

    Wild Ale

    Category

    Wild Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    9.70

    Avery Brewing Company Insula Multos Collibus

    Sour with Flavors of Cherries and Notes of Bourbon, Oak, and Vanilla 

    Sour with Flavors of Cherries and Notes of Bourbon, Oak, and Vanilla 

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    Style:
    Wild Ale

    Brewery:
    Avery Brewing Company

    4910 Nautilus Ct
    Boulder, CO 80301

    http://averybrewing.com/

    In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the ...

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    In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the Avery Brewing Company in Boulder, Colorado and still acts as president and head brewer. 

    Like many of its older craft brew brethren, Avery started out very small. When it opened, the brewery utilized only a seven-barrel tank to ferment, leading to a very low volume of production. In the years since, the brewery has expanded significantly to encompass the entire block of warehouses where it’s located. Even after 21 years, Avery is still a relatively small operation with a limited national footprint.  We’re lucky Avery has been in the Texas market for many years.

    These days, Avery is best known for big, extreme beers, but that hasn’t always been the case. The original line-up consisted of an Amber Ale, a Brown and a Dry Stout. It wasn’t until 1995 that Avery released Avery IPA. In 1999, Avery released Hog Heaven, a beer that they still call American Barley Wine to this day, but in reality, Hog Heaven was one of the first Double IPAs in the world.

    It was around this time (late 1999 -2003) that Avery’s beer lineup became the heavy hitting powerhouse that it is today.  Reverend the Belgian Quad launched in 2000, Salvation the Belgium Golden in 2002, and in 2003, Czar the Russian Imperial Stout ascended to the throne and is one of Hay Merchant’s favorite Avery beers. Avery’s first experiments with barrel aging began in 2004, along with the release of the Maharaja, a 120 IBU 10.5% monster of an Imperial IPA.

    In recent years, Avery has become known for its sour barrel-aged beers. The first beer in the series, Barbant, was released and was limited to 694 cases. It was an ale pitched with Brett and aged for 9 months in Zinfandel barrels. Anvil Bar and Refuge (Hay Merchant’s sister cocktail bar) was one of the only bars in Texas to get a case of this very rare beer.  Over the last few years, Avery has released a few of these beers a year, and each one is different.

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    Glassware

    Bottle Size

    12oz

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Odell Brewing Company Jolly Russian
  • Odell Brewing Company Jolly Russian

    Style

    Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

    Category

    Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

    IBU

    45

    ABV

    13.30

    Odell Brewing Company Jolly Russian

    Bridging the Baltic and Caribbean Seas, Jolly Russian is a rich Russian Imperial Stout stowed away in Rum Barrels for aging. Dark as night and thick as the raging sea, this brew boasts notes of coffee and cocoa with waves of oak, spiced molasses, dried ...

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    Bridging the Baltic and Caribbean Seas, Jolly Russian is a rich Russian Imperial Stout stowed away in Rum Barrels for aging. Dark as night and thick as the raging sea, this brew boasts notes of coffee and cocoa with waves of oak, spiced molasses, dried fruit and vanilla from the planks. It’s dangerously delicious!

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    Style:
    Barrel Aged Imperial Stout

    Brewery:
    Odell Brewing Company

    800 East Lincoln Avenue
    Fort Collins, CO 80524

    http://odellbrewing.com/

    Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create ...

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    Founded in 1989, Odell Brewing was started by Doug Odell, his wife Wynne and his sister Corkie. Today, the culture of family and collaboration still thrives, fostering a brewery full of beer-centric people. It is this passion for beer that inspires Odell Brewing to create quality, hand-crafted, innovative brews.

    In 2009, having outgrown every inch and aspect of their previous brewery, Odell doubled its plant size to 45,000 square feet and its beer sold to 45,000 barrels—one barrel per square foot! 

    As a regional craft brewery, Odell Brewing is committed to serving the communities in which it distributes by sourcing local raw materials, and through its charitable giving program known as Odell Outreach. Odell Brewing is an award winning brewery, nationally and internationally. 

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    40 - 50 / Black

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf Kölsch
  • Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf Kölsch

    Style

    Kolsch

    Category

    Kolsch

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    4.80

    Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf Kölsch

    "These days Reissdorf Kolsch has almost reached a "cult status" with beer connoisseurs around the world looking at it as a "well preserved secret". Top fermentation lasts for about eight days with another four weeks of cold conditioning following. "Reissdorf Kolsch" is designed to be ...

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    "These days Reissdorf Kolsch has almost reached a "cult status" with beer connoisseurs around the world looking at it as a "well preserved secret". Top fermentation lasts for about eight days with another four weeks of cold conditioning following. "Reissdorf Kolsch" is designed to be pale of color, soft on the palate, restrained on fruitiness, with a delicate dryness in the finish. "Reissdorf Kolsch" is a "session style" beer served in its typical 7 oz. glass in the wee-hours after work.

    Another tradition unique to this beer style is its method of serving. Small wooden casks brought up to the pub via dumb waiter and placed on the bar counter are gravity -dispensed into narrow, cylindrical glasses (20 cl) called " Stangen" to expedite the pouring of the beer as well as to reduce the waiting time for impatient guests." Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Kolsch

    Kolsch
    Kolsch is a young style in the beer world, recognized only for the last 100 years or so. It’s a crisp, clean, delicately balanced beer with very subtle fruit flavors and aromas.

    Appearance 
    The appearance of Kolsch is very pale or light gold ...

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    Kolsch
    Kolsch is a young style in the beer world, recognized only for the last 100 years or so. It’s a crisp, clean, delicately balanced beer with very subtle fruit flavors and aromas.

    Appearance 
    The appearance of Kolsch is very pale or light gold. Authentic versions are filtered to a brilliant clarity.

    Aroma/Flavor
    Kolsch has a pleasant, subtle fruit aroma from fermentation.  Sometimes there is a light sulfur character from the yeast. The lower fermention temperature forces the yeast to strugle and thus produce slightly sulfur off flavors. 

    The style has a delicate flavor and a low to medium bitterness with a dryness and slight pucker in the finish, but no harsh dryness.  It is smooth and crisp in the mouth with a light to medium body.  It’s generally well attenuated, but not dry. It’s more malty than a Helles and less bitter than a Pilsner. 

    Ingredients 
    Kolsch is made with German noble hops and German Pils or pale malt. Traditionally, this style uses a step mash program—fermented at cool temperatures and lagered for at least a month. Kolsch yeast is top fermenting. It’s a hybrid because it uses an ale yeast but is lagered for as long as 10 weeks. 

    Glassware and Serving Temperature 
    Kolsch is classically served in a small 200mL straight-sided glass, but at Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

    Stats
    Beers of this style are most often 4.4%-5.2% ABV and 20-30 IBU. 

    Example
    Great examples of this style are Sunner Kolsch and Saint Arnold’s Lawnmower. 

    History 

    Kolsch, recognized as a style only for the last 100 years, is the only beer with its own protected appellation and is restricted to the 20 or so producing breweries in and around Cologne.  Only 11 of these breweries make a Kolsch, and about 2.6 million barrels are produced a year in Cologne. Kolsch is also the name for the German spoken dialect in Cologne, which is most likely the origin of its name. 

    Kolsch is a unique example of cooperation in brewing. The city of Cologne decided that instead of allowing the cities breweries compete against each other by brewing different styles they would all brew the same thing and compete against other cities and other regions.

    Many American craft breweries make a Kolsch style because it’s a good gateway away from bland macro beers.
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    Brewery:
    Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf

    Emil-Hoffmann-Straße 4-10
    Köln, 50996

    https://www.reissdorf.de/

    Founded on October 4, 1894 by Heinrich Reissdorf and his wife Gertrud in the city of Cologne (Köln), the Reissdorf brewery has established itself as the pre-eminent brewery of the classic Kölsch.

    During the period of "promoterism" at the end of the 19th ...

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    Founded on October 4, 1894 by Heinrich Reissdorf and his wife Gertrud in the city of Cologne (Köln), the Reissdorf brewery has established itself as the pre-eminent brewery of the classic Kölsch.

    During the period of "promoterism" at the end of the 19th century, the breweries in Cologne sprang up like mushrooms. In this era, the Privat-brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf was founded. Its founder, Heinrich Reissdorf, derived from an old-established farmer family who were based in Zieverich as farriers and coach builders. A few years later, in 1905, the name Kölsch was established for the top-fermented Cologne beer-speciality. After Heinrich's death in 1901, Gertrud Reissdorf managed the brewery until 1908. The continuance of the company had never been in danger, though, since the Reissdorf couple had five sons: Johann Hubert, Heinrich, Hermann, Friedrich and Carl Reissdorf.

    When the product range was diversified to further other styles of beer, the top-fermenting brewery was renamed to Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf in 1923. Friedrich's two sons Hermann-Josef and Karl-Heinz led the company through economically difficult times after World War II, when 90 percent of the brewery was destroyed. Today, the business is continued in the fourth generation.

    Due to a prosperous development of the Privat-Brauerei Heinrich Reissdorf, a new site for the brewery had to be found within the boundaries of the city of Cologne; therefore, the company purchased premises in an industrial park in Cologne-Rodenkirchen. With the new production facility, a brewery with most modern brewing technology was built, which meets the highest quality criteria.

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Kwaremont
  • Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Kwaremont

    Style

    Belgian Style Pale Ale

    Category

    Belgian Style Pale Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    6.60

    Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik) Kwaremont

    "Kwaremont blond is just like the killer climb of the Oude Kwaremont in the Flemish Ardennes: fiery and packed with character. This full malt beer delivers that jolt of liquid sugar you crave after pedalling your heart out." Commercial Description

    "Kwaremont blond is just like the killer climb of the Oude Kwaremont in the Flemish Ardennes: fiery and packed with character. This full malt beer delivers that jolt of liquid sugar you crave after pedalling your heart out." Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Belgian Style Pale Ale

    Brewery:
    Brabandere Brewery (The Brewery Formerly Known as Bavik)

    Rijksweg(B) 33
    Bavikhove, 8531

    http://www.brouwerijdebrabandere.be/home-en

    The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other ...

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    The Brabandere Brewery (Brouwerij De Brabandere) was founded in 1894 and opened in 1895 by Adolphe De Brabandere in Bavikhove. In 1909, Joseph Brabandere took the brewery over and renamed it The Brewery of Saint Anthony and also expanded its production capacity. In 1950, other family members took control of the brewery, changed the name back to Brabandere Brewery and began to open a large number of cafés and pubs. Bradandere expanded its own market base by making the brewery the sole supplier of product to those cafés.

    In 1990, the family split the operations of the cafés and the brewery. The brewery was renamed again, this time taking inspiration from the town that had been home to the brewery for almost 100 years—Bavik. Over the next decade, the brewery made some large investments into the brewery itself, modernizing the brewery and expanding capacity, making it one of the largest family-owned breweries in Belgium.

    In 2013, the fifth generation of the Brabandere family took over. The decision was made to once again use the family name, and thus the Brabandere Brewery was revived.

    In Belgium, beers are traditionally known by their stand alone brand names and not by the brewery name. Brabandere brews  three main brands: Bavik, Wittekerke and Petrus. Bavik is best known for the Pilsner, a light, refreshing, slightly hopped bohemian rendition of the style. Wittekerke is the brand used to sell wheat beers. Petrus is the moniker that adorns the “special” beers—usually higher in alcohol or anything different from the core brand of that particular brewery, not always referring to the same style of beer. The most notable beer from the Petrus line is the Aged Pale: 100 percent pale malts, dry hopped and aged for at least 18 months in large wooden fermenters. This beer is light in body but aggressively sour in taste—a Hay Merchant favorite.

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    Glassware

    Tulip

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    3 - 3 / Straw

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) L'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien
  • BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) L'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien

    Style

    Wild Ale

    Category

    Wild Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    11.00

    BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes) L'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien

    "Boldly treading the boundary between port, wine and beer, l'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien is a unique ale aged in wooden casks which have been used for several years before to age Merlot, Merlot Cabernet, Whisky and then Grappa. It manages to merge into L ...

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    "Boldly treading the boundary between port, wine and beer, l'Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien is a unique ale aged in wooden casks which have been used for several years before to age Merlot, Merlot Cabernet, Whisky and then Grappa. It manages to merge into L'Abbaye all the complex aromas of a vintage red wine along with the delicate harmony and flavors of the wood and its former contents. This process requires close monitoring of the beer's evolution. The final version is blended from different casks, to ensure optimal balance, complexity and enjoyment! Thus named in fond memory of Bon-Chien, the late brewery cat, deceased in June 2005, whose antics were very popular with brewery visitors" Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Wild Ale

    Brewery:
    BFM (Brasserie des Franches Montagnes)

    Ch. des Buissons 8
    Saignelégier, CH-2350

    http://www.brasseriebfm.ch/en/

    Jérôme Rebetez concocted the first batches of beer in his parents’ kitchen. Enthusiastic about his results, he decided to present some of his creations at the “Swiss Homebrewing Trophy” contest. Apparently, he wasn’t the only one who enjoyed his brews; the judges ...

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    Jérôme Rebetez concocted the first batches of beer in his parents’ kitchen. Enthusiastic about his results, he decided to present some of his creations at the “Swiss Homebrewing Trophy” contest. Apparently, he wasn’t the only one who enjoyed his brews; the judges at the contest awarded Jérôme the first place.

    At 23, with a bachelor in enology, Jérôme Rebetez aspired to open up a brewery in his home region of Franches Montagnes. Full of passion but without any cash, Jérôme Rebetez decided to create beers with atypical character. He won the televised competition "Le rêve de vos 20 ans," which allowed him to establish La Brasserie des Franches-Montagnes in Saignelégier, Jura, with the obtained cash. With its spirited image, BFM was positioned as a pioneer in Swiss artisan brewing, crafting finesse beers that are complex with a great corps.

    Jérôme Rebetez uses ingredients chosen to guarantee the highest quality. They are always original and sometimes tricky to mix like Sarawak pepper, sage or other spices. He built a reputation for crafting rich beers with complex bouquets, remarkable tastes and long finishes. 

    L’Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien, a BFM specialty that matures in oak barrels for 12 months, was mentioned in The New York Times as the one of the best barley wines in the world.

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    Glassware

    Sour

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    24 - 29 / Ruby Brown

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Brooklyn Brewery Lager
  • Brooklyn Brewery Lager

    Style

    Vienna Lager (Amber Lager)

    Category

    Vienna Lager (Amber Lager)

    IBU

    33

    ABV

    5.20

    Brooklyn Brewery Lager

    "In the late 1800’s Brooklyn was one of the largest brewing centers in the country, home to more than 45 breweries. Lager beer in the “Vienna” style was one of the local favorites. Brooklyn Lager is amber-gold in color and displays a firm malt ...

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    "In the late 1800’s Brooklyn was one of the largest brewing centers in the country, home to more than 45 breweries. Lager beer in the “Vienna” style was one of the local favorites. Brooklyn Lager is amber-gold in color and displays a firm malt center supported by a refreshing bitterness and floral hop aroma. Caramel malts show in the finish. The aromatic qualities of the beer are enhanced by “dry-hopping”, the centuries-old practice of steeping the beer with fresh hops as it undergoes a long, cold maturation. The result is a wonderfully flavorful beer, smooth, refreshing and very versatile with food. Dry-hopping is largely a British technique, which we’ve used in a Viennese-style beer to create an American original." Commercial Description

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    Style:
    Vienna Lager (Amber Lager)

    Vienna Lager is a classic German lager. It was very common in the years after its first release in 1840, but it has become somewhat rare.

    Appearance 
    The lager should be light reddish amber to copper color with bright clarity and a large off-white, persistent ...

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    Vienna Lager is a classic German lager. It was very common in the years after its first release in 1840, but it has become somewhat rare.

    Appearance 
    The lager should be light reddish amber to copper color with bright clarity and a large off-white, persistent head.

    Aroma/Flavor
    The beer should have a moderately rich German malt aroma (of Vienna and/or Munich malt). It has clean lager character, with no fruity esters or diacetyl. Noble hop aroma may be low to none.

    On the palate, soft, elegant malt complexity is in the forefront, with a firm enough hop bitterness to provide a balanced finish. There is toasted character from the use of Vienna malt, but no roasted or caramel flavor. The finish is fairly dry, with both malt and hop bitterness present in the aftertaste.

    Ingredients 
    As with Oktoberfests, only the finest quality malt should be used, along with Continental hops (preferably Noble varieties). It’s made with moderately hard, carbonate-rich water. Some caramel malts and/or darker malts may be used to add color and sweetness, but caramel malts shouldn’t add significant aroma and flavor and dark malts shouldn’t provide any roasted character. 

    Glassware and Serving Temperature 
    At Hay Merchant, this style of beer is served in an 16oz American Pint. We store and serve the beer from our lager cooler at 35° F.

    Stats
    Vienna ranges in the high 20s (IBU). Vienna Lagers are also lightly darker then the similar Märzen (11-14 SRM compared to 9-13 SRM, but noticeable lighter then than dark lagers of the time (40 SRM). 

    History 
    Vienna lagers and Märzen are very closely related. Both beers were brought to the market in 1841, one year before Pilsner made it appearance. The two brewers that invented the styles (Vienna lagers and Märzen) were close friends and helped each other develop the two different styles. Vienna Lager was developed by Anton Dreher. who owned the Schwechat Brewery near Vienna. Märzen was developed by Gabriel Sedlmayr.

    Prior to the development of Vienna lagers, Märzen and Pilsner in the early 1840s all German lagers were a shade of dark brown, due to the malts brewers were using. Prior to 1840, all German malts were dried using a direct fire method. This technique used open flame to heat the stone floor of the malt kiln. The resulting malts were unevenly roasted. Some kernels were very dark, while others were light. Some kernels were very dry, and others still had fairly high moisture content.

    In the early 1800s, the British developed a way to dry malts using an indirect method. By using heated air instead of direct flame, the malt could be completely dried without burning or even darkening. The result was pale malt. The British used pale malt to start brewing beers like Pale Ale.

    In 1833, Dreher and Sedlmayr went on a fact-finding mission to the United Kingdom. Some people would call the trip an exercise in industrial espionage; others would call it smart business. Call it what you may, but upon their return to their respective breweries, they quickly adopted the British method of malt drying.

    Using these new methods, Dreher released a completely new beer: Vienna Lager, which had medium body and full malty flavor (typical Central Eurpean).  Vienna finishes much dryer then Märzen with a higher level of bitterness up front. 

    The unique blend of British influence and German flavor led to the invention of a new beer style and a new type of malt. While Vienna Lager is rare today, Vienna malt is still widely used.

    Strangely enough, Vienna Lagers are most commonly found in Mexico. This might have to do with the very brief period from 1864-1867 that Archduke Ferdinand Maximillian Joseph ruled Mexico as Maximilian I, Emperor of Mexico. Unfortunately, high quality examples of this style no longer exist even in Mexico due to the industrial scaled production methods employed. 

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    Brewery:
    Brooklyn Brewery

    79 N 11th St.
    Brooklyn, NY 11249

    http://brooklynbrewery.com/

    In 1984, Steve Hindy ended a five and a half-year tour as the Middle East Correspondent for the Associated Press where he covered wars and assassinations in Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, Egypt and Sudan. On his last night in Beirut, his hotel was hit by ...

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    In 1984, Steve Hindy ended a five and a half-year tour as the Middle East Correspondent for the Associated Press where he covered wars and assassinations in Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, Egypt and Sudan. On his last night in Beirut, his hotel was hit by a mortar barrage. Steve picked up a still-warm piece of shrapnel as a memento, packed up his family and returned to New York City. During his years in the Middle East, Steve befriended diplomats based in Saudi Arabia, where Islamic law prohibits alcoholic beverages. The envoys were avid homebrewers and happily plied Steve with their flavorful beers. Returning to live in Brooklyn and editing foreign news for Newsday, Steve started brewing at home. Eventually, he enlisted his downstairs neighbor, banker Tom Potter, and they set out to establish the Brooklyn Brewery. Steve placed that shrapnel on his desk as a reminder of his days in the Middle East, where it still sits today.

    Steve and Tom commissioned fourth-generation brewmaster William M. Moeller, a former head brewer at Philadelphia’s Schmidt Brewery, to brew Brooklyn Lager at the FX Matt Brewery in Utica, New York. Moeller pored over the brewing logs of a grandfather of his who had brewed in Brooklyn at the turn of the last century to develop a recipe for Brooklyn Lager. The result was an all-malt lager beer with a tangy aroma created by “dry-hopping,” an age-old technique of adding hops during the maturation process to create a robust aroma. Brooklyn Lager made quite a splash in the 1980s beer scene in New York City, dominated by the light, rice and corn lagers sold by Budweiser, Miller and Coors.

    In 1988, Steve and Tom delivered their first cases of beer, and flickerings of brewed glory began to appear in Brooklyn once again. Word started to spread that the two men could be found at bars and restaurants pouring this (relatively) shocking concoction that was darker than Heineken and smelled strongly of hops, of all things.

    In 1994, Garrett Oliver was brought on board as brewmaster to helm the brewing program and work on establishing the brand new Williamsburg brewhouse. Garrett began homebrewing in the 1980s after living in England for a time, where he discovered cask-fermented real ale in between gigs managing rock bands. Garrett’s talents and personal flair led to his tenure as President of the New York City Homebrewer’s Guild, where he met Steve Hindy. Whether or not Garrett was wearing a cape (a matter of mild contention between the two men to this day), this meeting included Garrett describing the recipe that would become Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout. Not long after, Garrett left his post as brewmaster of Manhattan Brewing to cross the East River and join Brooklyn Brewery. On May 28, 1996, Mayor Rudy Giuliani cut the ribbon at the grand opening of the new Brooklyn Brewery brewhouse, Tasting Room and offices in Brooklyn.

    Garrett went on to develop recipes from Black Chocolate Stout to East IPA, seasonal favorites to limited run Brewmaster’s Reserve releases. His beers and his books - including The Good Beer Book, The Brewmaster’s Table and The Oxford Companion to Beer - have won many international awards, including the 2014 James Beard Award for Outstanding Wine, Beer or Spirits Professional. To this day Garrett serves as brewmaster as well as juggling a demanding international travel schedule to teach and learn new brewing techniques.

    2003 was a year of big changes for Brooklyn Brewery. Years of growth made the brewery large enough to be taken seriously by big distributors, so the distribution arm of Brooklyn Brewery was sold off. Tom, who had been heavily involved in the distribution division for the previous fifteen years, decided the time was right for him to retire and sold his shares to the Ottaway family. (Not long after, Tom grew bored with retirement and filled his time by founding the New York Distilling Company not far from the Brooklyn Brewery.) The Ottaways were longtime friends and early investors, spreading from David Ottaway’s days in the Middle East as a Washington Post reporter alongside Steve Hindy.

    David Ottaway’s two sons, Eric and Robin, had run the Brooklyn Brewery’s Massachusetts distribution company before it was sold in 2002. In 2014, Steve announced that the Ottaway brothers were assuming official leadership roles in the brewery, with Eric serving as CEO and Robin as President. All three continue to be highly involved in daily life at the brewery, which continues to be independently owned to this day.

    Today, the Brooklyn Brewery is continuing to thrive, spreading good beer around the world. Bars and restaurants from Texas to Sweden to Australia proudly pour Brooklyn beer and display its iconic logo in great cities and far-flung reaches. Here in Brooklyn, Garrett and his team push the boundaries of brewing with an expanded barrel aging program housed in the historic Brooklyn Navy Yard down the road from the brewery and an extensive roster of experimental batches tucked away for study (and tasting.) 

    The brewery is also currently planning an expansion site to boost production and send even more beer to old and new markets worldwide. 

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    9 - 11 / Pale Amber

    Original Gravity

    13.000 plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Cascade +

    Flavor: Intense citrus, grapefruit and piney notes.

    Aroma: Spicy flowers and some grass.

    Alpha Acids: 4.5 - 7%                      

    Beta Acids: 4.5 - 7%                         

    Dual Purpose 

    Hallertau Mittelfruh-German +

    Flavor: Slightly spicy but clean bitterness

    Aroma: Mild and spicy with floral tones

    Alpha Acids: 3 - 5.5%                                  

    Beta Acids: 3 - 5%                

    Aroma 

    Vanguard +

    Flavor: Fine bittering with floral and slightly piney notes.

    Aroma: Very subtle spice and floral tones. Earthy and herbal as well.

    Alpha Acids: 5 - 6%                         

    Beta Acids: 5 - 7%                

    Aroma

    Malt Variety

    2-Row Malt +

  • Brouwerij Boon Lambic
  • Brouwerij Boon Lambic

    Style

    Lambic

    Category

    Lambic

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    7.00

    Brouwerij Boon Lambic

    Lambiek Boon is the origin of the Boon beers of spontaneous fermentation. This Lambiek has aged on oak casks for two years and has a delicate taste.

    Lambiek Boon is the origin of the Boon beers of spontaneous fermentation. This Lambiek has aged on oak casks for two years and has a delicate taste.

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    Style:
    Lambic

    Brewery:
    Brouwerij Boon

    Fonteinstraat 65
    Lembeek, Belgium B1502

    http://www.boon.be/

    Glassware

    Sour

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • (512) Brewing Company Lambicus
  • (512) Brewing Company Lambicus

    Style

    IPA

    Category

    IPA

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    6.80

    (512) Brewing Company Lambicus

    Their IPA with Brett added.

    Their IPA with Brett added.

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    Style:
    IPA

    IPA (India Pale Ale) 
    Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
    About Pale Ales
    Pale Ale is a large category ...
    read more
    IPA (India Pale Ale) 
    Now become one of the most prevalent styles brewed by craft brewers, IPAs were the first Pale Ales made. Overall, this style is a decidedly hoppy, bitter, moderately strong American Pale Ale.
    About Pale Ales
    Pale Ale is a large category encompassing Bitters, ESBs, IPAs and American Pale Ales. Pale is a relative term in beer and should be viewed only as a style name and not a true descriptor of color. Historically, beer was dark because malts were dark. Until the 1800s, the “palest” beer was comparable to a brown today because it was not possible to roast the malts without darkening them. Coke, a charcoal form of coal, was first used in iron smelting. Coke burned cleaner than coal and allowed for the production of paler malts. These malts became widely available around 1820. The beer that was made from these coke-burning kilns was much lighter than the beers that were drunk at the time, thus they were named Pale Ales. By today’s standards, these beers are more amber colored—technology improved after the invention of pale malts, and even though the malts got lighter, the name “Pale Ale” stuck to these amber and light tan colored ales.

    Appearance
    The color ranges from medium gold to medium reddish copper, while some versions have an orangish tint. IPAs are clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions can be hazy. There is good head stand with white to off-white color, which persists.

    Aroma/Taste
    A prominent to intense hop aroma is present, with a citrusy, floral, perfume-like, resinous, piney and fruity character derived from American hops. Many versions are dry-hopped and can have an additional grassy aroma. Some clean, malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness may be detected in some versions. Some alcohol may be noted. 
    The flavor reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous, piney or fruity aspects. There is medium high to very high hop bitterness, although the malt backbone supports the strong hop character and provides the best balance. Malt flavor is generally clean and malty sweet, although some caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Bitterness may linger into the aftertaste, and there is a medium dry to dry finish. American Ale yeast will help with a dry yet fruity finish. The mouthfeel is smooth—medium light to medium bodied mouthfeel. Moderate to medium high carbonation combines to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness.
    Ingredients
    IPAs contain Pale Ale malt, generally American 2-row, American Hops and American Ale yeast. It’s mashed at a lower temperature to help with high yeast attenuation.

    Glassware and Serving Temperature
    At Hay Merchant, we serve this style in an American Pint poured from our ale cooler at 50-55°.

    Stats
    This style will have a common ABV range of 5.5%-7% and an average IBU range of 40-70.
    Examples
    Great examples of this style include Stone IPA, Bear Republic Racer 5, (512) IPA, Live Oak Liberation and Real Ale Lost Gold. 

    History 
    The style was first brewed in the U.K. for export to India. The first IPAs were shipped in 1790. It was well-known at the time—though not understood why—that beers with lots of hops kept very well and could withstand the long voyage. Historical evidence indicates that the first IPAs had more than 1.100 on original gravity and between 150-180 IBUs. The trip from England to India took 6 weeks by ship. For the voyage, the beer was stored in oak casks. These casks most likely carried with them a small amount of wild yeast and bacteria. The high levels of hops would have helped fight the infections, but as the beer aged on the voyage, and once it reached port, the hops would slowly fade, and the sour notes would begin to come out. The combination of these factors led to the final flavor of historical IPAs: a boozy, hoppy, slightly sour, slightly oaky ale.
    Historically speaking, there are three different incarnations of the IPA. First was a Stock London-style Pale Ale exported by Hodgson from 1750-1820. Second, Burton-brewed Pale Ale was exported from 1820-1900. Finally, new laws and the temperance movement, as well as a decrease in exportation, led to the modern English IPA that is lower in alcohol and less hoppy.
    It is very important to understand the roll that taxation played in the story of the IPA. The style went from a hoppy, bitter, boozy powerhouse to what we now call English IPA—a mild mannered style that bears little resemblance to the original. In 1880, the Free Mash Tun Act (FMTA) was passed by the British government. The FMTA stopped the taxation on brewers when they bought the raw ingredients and instead taxed them on the gravity of the wort at the time the yeast was pitched. This was a huge blow to high gravity beer in the U.K. It took a few years for the tax to really do damage, but by 1900, the old IPAs were gone and had been replaced by what came to be called Bitters. Later in the 20th century, IPAs were still being brewed in the U.K., but they were shadows of their former selves. The original IPA was basically forgotten. To avoid confusion, when we talk about the English IPA style, we are referring to the current version of the beer, not the original pre-FMTA version.
    American craft brewers began brewing their versions of IPAs in the 1980s and 1990s. At the time, they started out brewing English IPAs with the ingredients they had on hand—American malts and hops. These early American craft brewers soon began pushing the boundaries of what an IPA could be. By the end of the 1990s, the American style of IPA was becoming wildly popular on the West coast, with 90+ IBU and averaging 6%-7% ABV. American craft brewers had unwittingly rediscovered the lost true English IPA.
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    Brewery:
    (512) Brewing Company

    407 Radam
    Austin, TX 78745

    http://www.512brewing.com/

    (512) Brewing Company is a microbrewery located in the heart of Austin. Owner Kevin Brand, with an engineering degree and a background in medical devices, is a self-taught brewer.  (512), named for the Austin area code, brews for the community using as many local, domestic ...

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    (512) Brewing Company is a microbrewery located in the heart of Austin. Owner Kevin Brand, with an engineering degree and a background in medical devices, is a self-taught brewer.  (512), named for the Austin area code, brews for the community using as many local, domestic and organic ingredients as possible. (512) beers are built on old world English and Belgian styles, enhanced to celebrate bold domestic ingredients.

    Flagship beers include Wit, Pale, IPA and Pecan Porter.  Limited beers include (512) Black IPA, (512) Bruin, (512) Whiskey Barrel Aged Double Pecan Porter and more.

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    Glassware

    Tulip

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Columbus +

    Flavor: Strong earthy flavors with some spice. Very bitter bite.

    Aroma: Earthy aroma with some hints of citrus.

    Alpha Acids: 14 - 16%         

    Beta Acids: 4 - 5%                            

    Dual Purpose

    Glacier +

    Flavor: Lots of fruitiness, pear, apricot and orange

    Aroma: Pleasant earthy and herbal aromas, as well as citrus and fruity notes

    Alpha Acids: 3.5 - 7.5%                   

    Beta Acids: 5 - 9%                

    Dual Purpose

    Simcoe +

    Flavor: Very unique blend of citrus and pine.

    Aroma: Pine tree, citrus and passion fruit. Very unique.

    Alpha Acids: 12 - 14%                     

    Beta Acids: 4 - 5%                

    Dual Purpose

    Malt Variety

    2-Row Malt +

    Crystal +

    Wheat +

  • Clown Shoes Lil Crispy
  • Clown Shoes Lil Crispy

    Style

    American Lager

    Category

    American Lager

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    4.80

    Clown Shoes Lil Crispy

    Style:
    American Lager

    Brewery:
    Clown Shoes

    23 Hayward Street
    Ipswich, MA 01938

    http://www.clownshoesbeer.com/

    The Clown Shoes mission is to produce beer without pretension while being free and a little crazy. Jesse Dooley, beer manager of Berman's liquor store in Lexington, Mass. began improving the store's beer offerings a few years ago. Eventually Gregg Berman, one of ...

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    The Clown Shoes mission is to produce beer without pretension while being free and a little crazy. Jesse Dooley, beer manager of Berman's liquor store in Lexington, Mass. began improving the store's beer offerings a few years ago. Eventually Gregg Berman, one of the owners, became interested in the craft beers he was bringing in. They started to talk about the idea of making their own beer, and then the realization clicked...they already had a distribution license. They could make a beer and distribute it! They initially contacted a few breweries to work with and Mercury Brewing Company, brewers of Ipswich Ales, stepped to the plate with open arms. Head Brewer Dan Lipke was the perfect match because he didn't merely listen to what Berman and Dooley were saying, he really understood what they wanted out of the brand. 


    What really sums up Clown Shoes is how they look at beer. Their goal: "To bring fresh, local and innovative beers to the folks without pretension. Ultimately, if we can make beer that people enjoy we have accomplished our goal." 

    read less

    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Back Pew Brewing Lucy
  • Back Pew Brewing Lucy

    Style

    Hefeweizen

    Category

    Hefeweizen

    IBU

    11

    ABV

    4.80

    Back Pew Brewing Lucy

    Style:
    Hefeweizen

    The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably) the ...

    read more

    The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably) the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat. Weissbier is German for “white beer.” Weissbiers were much paler than the dark beers that were so popular in Bavaria in earlier times, so the word “white” is used relatively. By today’s standards, Weissbier is more golden due to the development of light beers like Pilsner and Helles.

    The terms Hefe Weissbier or Hefe Weizen refer to any Weissbier that has yeast (Hefe) in it (i.e., a bottle-conditioned Weissbier). Outside Bavaria, most wheat beers are called Hefeweizen regardless of the yeast content or flavor profile. This practice is becoming less frequent as the American beer drinker becomes more savvy. We use the name Hefeweizen to describe a very specific German style of top fermenting wheat beer.

    Appearance 
    The appearance of Hefeweizen is pale straw to very dark gold in color. A good amount of haziness should be expected and is appropriate. A very thick, mousse-like, long lasing white head is characteristic.

    Aroma/Flavor
    The aroma has moderate to strong phenols and fruity esters. Noble hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma may be present. Acceptable aromatics can include a light, citrusy tartness, a light to moderate vanilla character and a low bubblegum and banana aroma.

    The flavor is a low to moderately strong banana and clove flavor. The balance and intensity of the phenol and ester components can vary.  A very light to moderate vanilla character or low bubblegum notes can accentuate the banana flavor. The soft, bready or grainy flavor of wheat is complementary. Hop flavor is low to none. A tart, citrusy character from yeast and high carbonation is often present. Well rounded with dry finish.

    The mouthfeel is medium-light to medium body.  The texture of wheat imparts the sensation of a fluffy, creamy fullness that may progress to a light, spritzy finish aided by high carbonation. Overall, a pale, spicy, fruity, refreshing wheat-based ale should be expected

    Ingredients 
    According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat.

    Glassware and Serving Temperature 
    At Hay Merchant we serve this style in a 20oz German Pilsner glass from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

    Stats 
    Beers of this style are most often 4.3% - 5.6% ABV and 8-15 IBU. 

    Examples 
    Beers like Live Oak Hefeweizen, and Weihenstephaner Hefe Weissbier are great examples of the style. 

    History 
    By the end of the middle ages in Germany, both barley and wheat were being used to make a top-fermented beer. The first true Weissbiers were made toward the end of the 15th century. In 1602, Duke Maximilian I placed a ban on public Weissbier brewing, and the Bavarian House of Dukes became the only body with the legal authority to brew Weissbiers. The profits from Prince Maximilian’s Weiss brewing helped fund the Thirty Years War.

    As the popularity of Weissbier waned, the German House of Dukes begin to outsource the reasonability to brew to the private sector around the early part of the 1800s but still maintained control.

    But the move to private brewing would not be enough to save Weissbier from extinction.  In 1855, Georg Schneider bought Wesses Brauhaus in Munich. In 1872, he worked a deal that ended the 250 year reign of royal brewing and allowed him to operate under his own terms. Even still, it wasn’t until the end of World War II that Weissbier regained its place as the No. 1 beer in Germany. Weissbier accounts for around 22 percent of the German market. It’s is the No. 1 selling micro-brewed style in Australia and can be found in the lineup of many American microbreweries.

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    Brewery:
    Back Pew Brewing

    26452 Sorters McClellan Rd
    Porter, TX 77365

    http://www.backpewbrewing.com/

    For many years, the building that occupied 26452 Sorters McClellan Road in Porter, Texas was a very different type of establishment. Though today the brewery bustles with machinery and fills with the aromas of beer, this old church building used to house a congregation and ...

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    For many years, the building that occupied 26452 Sorters McClellan Road in Porter, Texas was a very different type of establishment. Though today the brewery bustles with machinery and fills with the aromas of beer, this old church building used to house a congregation and fill with the sound of prayers.

    Though church folk are known for following tradition, we beer guys aren’t so easily defined. We seek inspiration from sources strange and fantastic, and we passionately brew our beers with creative characters and daring twists.

    We are the ones who do things differently, because it’s the only way we know. We are the misfits, the ones who don’t do things by the book, the ones who spurn convention, the ones who occupy the back pew. 

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Avery Brewing Company Lunctis Viribus
  • Avery Brewing Company Lunctis Viribus

    Style

    Wild Ale

    Category

    Wild Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    5.40

    Avery Brewing Company Lunctis Viribus

    50% ale aged in Tequila barrels and 50% ale aged in Cabernet Sauvignon barrels 

    50% ale aged in Tequila barrels and 50% ale aged in Cabernet Sauvignon barrels 

    read less

    Style:
    Wild Ale

    Brewery:
    Avery Brewing Company

    4910 Nautilus Ct
    Boulder, CO 80301

    http://averybrewing.com/

    In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the ...

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    In 1993, the craft world was a very different place. Styles like Double IPA that now rule the market weren’t even invented yet, and most craft brewers were fighting to simply not be put on the import list. That year, Adam Avery incorporated the Avery Brewing Company in Boulder, Colorado and still acts as president and head brewer. 

    Like many of its older craft brew brethren, Avery started out very small. When it opened, the brewery utilized only a seven-barrel tank to ferment, leading to a very low volume of production. In the years since, the brewery has expanded significantly to encompass the entire block of warehouses where it’s located. Even after 21 years, Avery is still a relatively small operation with a limited national footprint.  We’re lucky Avery has been in the Texas market for many years.

    These days, Avery is best known for big, extreme beers, but that hasn’t always been the case. The original line-up consisted of an Amber Ale, a Brown and a Dry Stout. It wasn’t until 1995 that Avery released Avery IPA. In 1999, Avery released Hog Heaven, a beer that they still call American Barley Wine to this day, but in reality, Hog Heaven was one of the first Double IPAs in the world.

    It was around this time (late 1999 -2003) that Avery’s beer lineup became the heavy hitting powerhouse that it is today.  Reverend the Belgian Quad launched in 2000, Salvation the Belgium Golden in 2002, and in 2003, Czar the Russian Imperial Stout ascended to the throne and is one of Hay Merchant’s favorite Avery beers. Avery’s first experiments with barrel aging began in 2004, along with the release of the Maharaja, a 120 IBU 10.5% monster of an Imperial IPA.

    In recent years, Avery has become known for its sour barrel-aged beers. The first beer in the series, Barbant, was released and was limited to 694 cases. It was an ale pitched with Brett and aged for 9 months in Zinfandel barrels. Anvil Bar and Refuge (Hay Merchant’s sister cocktail bar) was one of the only bars in Texas to get a case of this very rare beer.  Over the last few years, Avery has released a few of these beers a year, and each one is different.

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    Glassware

    Bottle Size

    12oz

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Destihl Brewery Lynnbrook
  • Destihl Brewery Lynnbrook

    Style

    Berliner Weisse

    Category

    Berliner Weisse

    IBU

    4

    ABV

    4.20

    Destihl Brewery Lynnbrook

    Lynnbrook, named after our founder's family farm, is a wild Berliner-style Weisse with raspberries added. The result is a refreshing, fuchsia-colored beer with an aroma of raspberry-lemon giving way to hints of brie with subtle lemon and yogurt-like flavors supported by tart, fresh raspberries ...

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    Lynnbrook, named after our founder's family farm, is a wild Berliner-style Weisse with raspberries added. The result is a refreshing, fuchsia-colored beer with an aroma of raspberry-lemon giving way to hints of brie with subtle lemon and yogurt-like flavors supported by tart, fresh raspberries and underlying lactic sourness.  

    read less

    Style:
    Berliner Weisse

    Berliner Weisse

    The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat to ...

    read more

    Berliner Weisse

    The name of the style itself can frequently help decipher what the beer should taste like. Weisen or Weizen are German words that literally mean “wheat.” According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50 percent wheat to use the names Hefeweizen, Wezenbier or Wessbier (the names are used interchangeably). Weissbier is German for “white beer.” Weissbiers were much paler than the dark beers that were so popular in Bavaria in earlier times, so the word “white” is used relatively. By today’s standards, Weissbier is more golden due to the development of  light beers like Pilsner and Helles.

    Berliner Weisse is the one style of Weissbeer not held to the German standard of 50% wheat. 

    Appearance 
    The appearance of Berliner Weisse is pale straw to very dark gold in color. A light haziness can be expected, but is not required. A very thick, mousse-like, long-lasting white head is characteristic. 

    Aroma/Flavor
    Lactic acid sourness is the most notable aroma.  Moderate to strong phenols and fruity esters are also present. Noble hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma may be present. Acceptable aromatics can include a light, citrusy tartness, a light to moderate vanilla character and a low bubblegum and banana aroma, as well as the keystone lactic sourness.

    The style has a mild sour flavor with a light and fruity character.

    Ingredients 
    According to the German beer purity law, the beer must be at least 50% wheat, but Berliner Weiss is the one weissbeer not held to this restriction. A traditional decoction mash is used to give the beer body and mouthfeel.

    Glassware and Serving Temperature 
    At Hay Merchant we will serve this style in a 20oz German Pilsner glass or English Pint poured from our lager cooler at 35°-37° F.

    Stats
    Beers of this style are most often 2%-3.5% ABV and 8-15 IBU. 

    Example
    A great example of this style is Saint Arnold Boiler Room. 

    History 
    By the end of the middle ages in Germany, both barley and wheat were being used to make a top-fermented beer. The first true Weissbiers were made toward the end of the 15th century. In 1602, Duke Maximilian I placed a ban on public Weissbier brewing, and the Bavarian House of Dukes became the only body with the legal authority to brew Weissbiers. The profits from Prince Maximilian’s Weiss brewing helped fund the Thirty Years War.

    As the popularity of Weissbier waned, the German House of Dukes begin to outsource the reasonability to brew to the private sector around the early part of the 1800s but still maintained control.

    But the move to private brewing would not be enough to save Weissbier from extinction.  In 1855, Georg Schneider bought Wesses Brauhaus in Munich. In 1872, he worked a deal that ended the 250 year reign of royal brewing and allowed him to operate under his own terms. Even still, it wasn’t until the end of World War II that Weissbier regained its place as the No. 1 beer in Germany. Weissbier accounts for around 22 percent of the German market. It’s the No. 1 selling micro-brewed style in Australia and can be found in the lineup of many American microbreweries.

    Berliner Weisse slowly found its definition from the 17th to the 20th century. At the heights of its popularity in the 19th century, there were more than 700 breweries making the style.  There isn’t a written history to the style’s exact origins, but two theories are possible. The first states that 18th century French immigrants came to Berlin via Flanders and picked up the techniques required to make sour beer from the producers of Flemish sour Red Ale.  The second theory points to a beer brewed in Berlin in the 1640s called Halberstadter Brogan that was based on an unknown style from Hamburg. 

    We do know that the style has not always been sour.  It was a light wheat beer—about 50/50 wheat and barley.  The beer was about 3% ABV and, most importantly, not boiled. The hops were boiled in a separate vessel, and then the boiling hop water was added to the mash to increase the temperature. Hops were also added to the mash itself, making it easier for the wort to run off in a straw bed. The lack of a wort boil led to a lack of sterilization, and it’s easy to imagine that huge levels of microorganisms had to be present, thanks to the straw bed and other factors. This would not be true spontaneous fermentation as we see in Lambics because the micros would have come from the straw. 

    These production methods led to three opportunities for lactic acid bacteria to infect the beer: 1) during the mash if left sitting at a low temperature, 2) during fermentation due to yeast cross contamination, and 3) in storage due to micro flora in the wooden barrels. 

    As the popularity of wheat beers began to wain across Germany prior to World War I, so did the popularity of Berliner Weisse. Lighter, less flavorful beers began to gain popularity, so the breweries serving Berliner Weisse began to add flavored syrups to the beer to make it more acceptable to the average drinker. Today, there are only two commercial brewers in Berlin making the style. 

    As of 2014, the style found new popularity in American craft beer, with more than 100 craft breweries releasing versions of the beer that year alone. It owes its newfound popularity to the overall rise in popularity of sour beers. Most American craft brewers use a mash rest to achieve the desired levels of lactic acid.  Once the mash process is completed, the brewer leaves the mash in the tun for several days.  Once the PH reaches the desired level, the wort is run off to the boil kettle.  Boiling the wort sanitizes the beer and ensures that the beer keeps its lactic acid flavor without exposing the rest of the brewery to contamination. 

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    Brewery:
    Destihl Brewery

    1616 General Electric (G.E.) Road, Unit #1
    Bloomington, IL 61704

    http://www.destihlbrewery.com/

    DESTIHL Brewery is located in the G.E. Warehouses just off of Veterans Parkway and General Electric (G.E.) Road in Bloomington, IL.  The 20,000-square-foot production brewery is situated just half a mile from their first gastrobrewpub location in Normal, IL.      

    The production brewery ...

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    DESTIHL Brewery is located in the G.E. Warehouses just off of Veterans Parkway and General Electric (G.E.) Road in Bloomington, IL.  The 20,000-square-foot production brewery is situated just half a mile from their first gastrobrewpub location in Normal, IL.      

    The production brewery features a 25 barrel (BBL), four vessel, steam-heated Saaz Brewhouse capable of producing over 20,000 barrels a year.  Currently they are operating with a 15,000 barrel annual fermentation capacity utilizing eight 60 barrel (BBL) fermenters, five 30 BBL fermenters, two 60 BBL and two 30 BBL brite tanks and a 60,000 lbs. malt silo. Their 5,000 sq ft. beer cellar is presently storing over 300 oak barrels (a mix of former California wine barrels and also bourbon barrels), plus a 33 hectoliter (871 gallon) oak foudre and two 45 hectoliter (1,188 gallon) oak foudres (each received directly from France).  The cellar has enough vertical space for over 100,000 cu. ft. of barrel aging, with the bulk of it used for their renowned sour beer program.  On the packaging side, they have an automated canning line manufactured by Cask Brewing Systems. They have recently added an Italian bottling line for bottling our Saint Dekkera Reserve Sour Ales and other specialty releases. This rotary, 6-head rinser/filler with labeler (fills 600-1,000 bottles per hour, or 10-16 bpm).

    The Destihl brewery concept was first brewed up in a five gallon batch of beer made by CEO & Brewmaster, Matt Potts, in a homebrew kit given to him by his wife, Lyn, for Christmas in 1995.  Matt's passion for craft beer started in the summer of 1991, before he entered law school, although brewing beer was in his blood as evidenced by bottles of homebrew made by his grandfather over 35 years ago which still remain in his family's farmhouse built in 1865.  After practicing law for over 11 years, Matt decided it was time for a career change, so he traded in his briefcase for a mash paddle, went to brewing school and opened the first DESTIHL Restaurant & Brew Works in 2007 with a team of people dedicated to only the best beer, food and service.
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    Glassware

    Sour

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • New Belgium Brewing Company Mural Agua Fresca
  • New Belgium Brewing Company Mural Agua Fresca

    Style

    Fruited Ale

    Category

    Fruited Ale

    IBU

    None

    ABV

    4.00

    New Belgium Brewing Company Mural Agua Fresca

    Produced in partnership with Primus Cerveceria, a leading Mexican craft brewery based in Mexico City founded by three cousins, Rodolfo, Jaime, and Rebeca. Mural is our joint homage to the classic agua fresca that also pushes the boundaries of what a beer can be. 

    In ...

    read more

    Produced in partnership with Primus Cerveceria, a leading Mexican craft brewery based in Mexico City founded by three cousins, Rodolfo, Jaime, and Rebeca. Mural is our joint homage to the classic agua fresca that also pushes the boundaries of what a beer can be. 

    In Mexico, the agua fresca is everywhere.  They're usually found in street food markets and feature a blend of seasonal fruits. Our cerveza takes inspiration from agua frescas and features hibiscus, agave, watermelon, and lime for a fresh, vibrant sip.  

    read less

    Style:
    Fruited Ale

    Brewery:
    New Belgium Brewing Company

    500 Linden Street
    Fort Collins, CO 80524

    http://www.newbelgium.com/

    New Belgium founder Jeff Lebesch was inspired to start his own brewery during a mountain biking trip to Belgium in 1989. 1989.  He returned home to Fort Collins, Colorado and began brewing beer in his basement--a brown dubbel with earthy undertones named Abbey and a ...

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    New Belgium founder Jeff Lebesch was inspired to start his own brewery during a mountain biking trip to Belgium in 1989. 1989.  He returned home to Fort Collins, Colorado and began brewing beer in his basement--a brown dubbel with earthy undertones named Abbey and a well-balanced amber called Fat Tire. 

    Jeff’s Belgian inspired brews garnered enough praise from friends and neighbors that Jeff and his wife Kim (now New Belgium's CEO) took their basement brewery commercial in 1991. Kim, social worker by day and mother to two always, began the marketing process by knocking on their neighbor's door. Artist Anne Fitch was that neighbor, whose watercolors came to help craft the New Belgium brand for 23 years, including the original Fat Tire label. 

    Bringing on Peter Bouckaert, a Belgian Brewmaster previously working at Rodenbach, in 1996 helped influence their love of sour beers. Moving forward, Peter would take the brewing reins as Jeff began pursuing other interests. In 2009, Jeff moved on completely and New Belgium continues to flourish with Kim, Peter and a team of dedicated employee-owners at the helm. 

    New Belgium is expanding to Asheville, North Carolina, and is in the midst of construction on a 133,000-square-foot brewery, scheduled to start brewing beer by the end of 2015. 

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    Glassware

    American Pint

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

  • Eureka Heights Brewing Company Neon Moon w/Azacca & Hibiscus
  • Eureka Heights Brewing Company Neon Moon w/Azacca & Hibiscus

    Style

    Belgian Style Golden

    Category

    Belgian Style Golden

    IBU

    33

    ABV

    4.30

    Eureka Heights Brewing Company Neon Moon w/Azacca & Hibiscus

    This hoppy Belgian-style Single
    combines Pilsner malt and Azacca
    hops to create a fruity and tropical
    aroma. This second summer crusher
    has a soft estery aroma with notes of
    peaches and pears. Flavor is stonefruit
    and citrus with a light breadiness.

    This hoppy Belgian-style Single
    combines Pilsner malt and Azacca
    hops to create a fruity and tropical
    aroma. This second summer crusher
    has a soft estery aroma with notes of
    peaches and pears. Flavor is stonefruit
    and citrus with a light breadiness.

    read less

    Style:
    Belgian Style Golden

    Brewery:
    Eureka Heights Brewing Company

    941 W 18TH ST
    Houston, Texas 77008

    http://www.eurekaheights.com/

    New brewery in the Heights

    New brewery in the Heights

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    Glassware

    Tulip

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Malt Variety

    Pilsner +

  • Legal Draft Beer Company Old Fashion Justice
  • Legal Draft Beer Company Old Fashion Justice

    Style

    Barrel Aged IPA

    Category

    Barrel Aged IPA

    IBU

    55

    ABV

    9.80

    Legal Draft Beer Company Old Fashion Justice

    Our Presumed Innocent IPA, aged for two months on freshly dumped Witherspoon whiskey barrels. After those two months, we added Citra hops and orange peel for a smooth, sweet finish.

    Our Presumed Innocent IPA, aged for two months on freshly dumped Witherspoon whiskey barrels. After those two months, we added Citra hops and orange peel for a smooth, sweet finish.

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    Style:
    Barrel Aged IPA

    Brewery:
    Legal Draft Beer Company

    500 E Division st
    Arlington, TX 76011

    http://www.legaldraftbeer.com/

    We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and ...

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    We started Legal Draft Beer Company because the great state of Texas simply doesn’t have enough great craft beer. We’re here to help. Our beers are brewed with care and attention to detail by our German Brewmaster with the finest ingredients available, and are meant to stand up with the best beers in our state, our nation, and the world. We hope you’ll enjoy them with your family and friends in our taproom and beer garden, or at your favorite watering hole.

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    Glassware

    Snifter

    Bottle Size

    SRM Value / Color

    In determination ...

    Original Gravity

    None plato

    Final Gravity

    None plato

    Hops

    Citra +

    Flavor: Lemon/lime and tropical fruitiness.

    Aroma: Very clean citrus aroma.

    Alpha Acids: 10 - 14%         

    Beta Acids: 3.5 - 4.5%                      

    Aroma

    Malt Variety

  • Stone Brewing Company Old Guardian 2015
  • Stone Brewing Company Old Guardian 2015

    Style

    American Barley Wine

    Category

    American Barley Wine

    IBU

    80

    ABV

    12.00

    Stone Brewing Company Old Guardian 2015

    "Barley wines are traditionally hefty brews, but ours is downright excessive. The huge maltiness of this beer is only tamed by an equally prodigious addition of hops, creating a rich, slightly sweet, caramel-hued ale infused with assertive bitterness and bright hop notes, all culminating in ...

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    "Barley wines are traditionally hefty brews, but ours is downright excessive. The huge maltiness of this beer is only tamed by an equally prodigious addition of hops, creating a rich, slightly sweet, caramel-hued ale infused with assertive bitterness and bright hop notes, all culminating in a pleasing dryness. While it will evolve into an even more glorious brew with age, this beer's delicious onslaught of flavors will seriously challenge your ability to wait any longer to drink it." Commercial Description

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